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Forum topic by IAMike posted 08-11-2015 10:49 PM 878 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IAMike

24 posts in 953 days


08-11-2015 10:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question ash milling

My parents just took down a huge, old ash tree that was damaged in a storm a couple years back. Almost all of what was left standing ended up being good, usable wood, it looks like. I’m going to have most of it turned into usable boards at a local-to-them sawyer. I had the tree service cut a few cookies off of the very base of the tree, where it was largest, so I could have them for some unknown projects down the line (and because the sawmill can’t handle logs as big around as these, anyhow!) Anyways, now I have 4, approximately 4” thick, 44” cookies, and I’m trying to think of a good way to preserve them and dry them, and still limit the amount of cracking and checking. I won’t be able to get there with my sealer until Friday afternoon, I figure that shouldn’t be a dealbreaker. Can anyone suggest a method of drying these monsters, other than “let them air dry for 4 years!” ?? I checked with the sawyer, their kiln isn’t configured to dry something that thick.

-- I'm thinking about starting a blog for my projects. It'll have to be called Woodworking By Dummies


16 replies so far

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1942 days


#1 posted 08-12-2015 02:09 AM

They will invariably crack. You have to slow down the drying to a crawl. Paint the surfaces with anchorseal or melted paraffin wax (like the stuff you can buy in the grocery store for home canning). This will help, but they are likely going to crack some no matter what you do.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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IAMike

24 posts in 953 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 02:33 AM

I have some Anchorseal that I’ll apply in a couple days when I get home. Being that the whole point of Anchorseal, wax, paint, etc, is to slow down moisture loss, I guess then it’d be safe to say that there’s no real way to speed up drying while keeping the wood intact and nice?

-- I'm thinking about starting a blog for my projects. It'll have to be called Woodworking By Dummies

View jkn09's profile

jkn09

49 posts in 780 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 03:04 PM

Nothing to add of substance, other than that this thread title reminded me of the KFC ad running right now. “And a big ol coookie”

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#4 posted 08-12-2015 03:41 PM

wait an hour and then take a dip in the pool.


Nothing to add of substance, other than that this thread title reminded me of the KFC ad running right now. “And a big ol coookie”

- jkn09


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Underdog's profile

Underdog

904 posts in 1501 days


#5 posted 08-12-2015 03:46 PM

It’s almost inevitable that it will crack. The physics involved almost guarantee it. The end grain over the whole surface loses moisture at the same rate, but the amount of tangential shrinkage at the outer diameter is much greater than the tangential shrinkage near the center. At some point the fibers will let go as the stress gets too great, and that’s when you get cracks. Even if you slow the drying down a great deal, you’re going to get the cracks…

Boiling in soap might help….

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#6 posted 08-12-2015 04:21 PM

Wood borers love ash and can really do a number on the lumber. Take some preventing action in that regard.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3426 days


#7 posted 08-12-2015 04:39 PM

They’re gonna crack. Just expect it to happen no matter what ya do.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 987 days


#8 posted 08-12-2015 07:18 PM

I wonder if anyone has tried keeping the perimeter moist while allowing the inside to dry or, in some way, accelerating the drying of the center. .Just wondering out loud.

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 897 days


#9 posted 08-12-2015 07:49 PM

http://www.preservation-solutions.com/wood-treatment-products/wood-treatment-product-guides/stabilizing-a-cross-cut-section-of-wood-with-pentacryl/
Pentacryl will prevent splitting. I’ve seen it done.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5730 posts in 2834 days


#10 posted 08-12-2015 11:37 PM

I rarely work with pieces like that and I have read all the “cracking” comments above so I am just wondering it a metal band, like those used to hold things on pallets, wrapped around the perimeter along Pentacryl.

I am only wondering as it would be nice to see that preserved in that shape for some really nice projects.

And I really like big cookies too!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1762 days


#11 posted 08-12-2015 11:41 PM

Alli I can add is, is that an ash tree? Looks like a walnut by the heartwood. Ash is white through and through. Or so I thought.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#12 posted 08-12-2015 11:50 PM

I have not seen ash with that dark heartwood where I live and the bark is much coarser than our white ash. As far as preserving/drying cookies goes, Good Luck! I have tried a lot of things that didn’t work. I even tried some hollow cookies with no success at all.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 987 days


#13 posted 08-13-2015 04:45 AM


Alli I can add is, is that an ash tree? Looks like a walnut by the heartwood. Ash is white through and through. Or so I thought.

- dhazelton


I have not seen ash with that dark heartwood where I live and the bark is much coarser than our white ash. As far as preserving/drying cookies goes, Good Luck! I have tried a lot of things that didn t work. I even tried some hollow cookies with no success at all.

- gfadvm

It looks like ash to me. Look at how deep the crevices in the bark are. That’s characteristic of ash.
There’s lots of darker ash. Also, this tree is still wet. ..Apparently just cut.

View IAMike's profile

IAMike

24 posts in 953 days


#14 posted 08-13-2015 05:12 AM

Definitely an ash. Maybe a green ash, not a white ash? Trying to figure that out, myself.

-- I'm thinking about starting a blog for my projects. It'll have to be called Woodworking By Dummies

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1942 days


#15 posted 08-13-2015 11:55 AM

Two ways to tell white ash from green ash.

1). Look at a twig with a leaf coming off it. Look at the junction of the twig and the leaf petiole. That is the point where the petiole is attached to the twig. There is a bud there. In white ash, if you look from the side, the base of the leaf petiole completely surrounds the bud, and you cannot see the top of the bud when viewed from the side. In green ash, the base of the petiole does not completely cover up the bud, and you can see a little bit of it sticking out when viewed from the side.

2). Look at the fruit if you have one. It is a single winged samara. At the base of the wing is the seed. In white ash, the wing of the samara terminates just past the top of the seed. In green ash, the wind extends alongside the seed almost down to the base of the seed.

Check out these links to look at the samara with the wing and the seed at the base.

White ash: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=46

Green ash: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=48

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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