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Help with my ECE primus jack plane

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Forum topic by bobasaurus posted 08-11-2015 04:57 PM 949 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bobasaurus

2675 posts in 2651 days


08-11-2015 04:57 PM

Topic tags/keywords: ece plane primus jack

I bought an ECE primus jack plane used a few years ago and haven’t quite gotten the hang of adjusting and using it. I’m hoping other plane users can answer some questions and give me advise.

First off, there are these two metal tacks on the bed that I don’t get:

They keep the blade from sitting flat against the bed, making it bend as spring pressure is applied from the rear knob. Is this on purpose? Seems an odd design choice since most of the nice flat bed isn’t contacting the blade. I get a lot of chatter from this plane in use, and I think this contributes to it significantly. I’m tempted to pry the tacks out and give it a test, but they have to have a purpose of some sort right?

Another problem is the “regulator” piece screwed to the chipbreaker. I believe it’s supposed to be used for lateral adjustments. As you move it side to side, the edges push against the cheeks of the plane and kind of move the blade. Unfortunately this movement is never as I expect… sometimes moving it will dip the opposite edge like a stanley/bailey lateral adjustment, but it never holds and a few strokes later the blade will be skewed to one side again. If I tighten the screw attaching the regulator (there is a lock washer below it), the whole plane blade assembly moves instead of just the regulator and shifts the lateral adjustment uncontrollably.

A final problem is the blade is always pushed to one side of the mouth (always the same side) while changing depth adjustments. So much so that it cuts into the wood of the cheek unless I pay attention. I believe the red-painted tension rod has been over-beveled on one side of the cross pin, which puts a slight sideways force on the blade when under tension. I’ve tried hammering the cross pin a little to even-out the non-beveled portions on each side, but it doesn’t change things much.

The only reliable way I’ve found to use this plane is with a cambered blade and hammer taps for lateral adjustment. But even with this results are pretty poor with a lot of chattering and tear out. It seems like the built-in adjustments should work better on a quality wooden plane. Can any fellow ECE owners give me some tips?

-- Allen, Colorado


7 replies so far

View Slemi's profile

Slemi

103 posts in 1008 days


#1 posted 08-11-2015 06:57 PM

http://www.fine-tools.com/G301047.html

Here is a little info. Hope it helps.

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jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#2 posted 08-12-2015 12:50 PM

I don’t have one of these, and it’s too bad someone who owns one hasn’t responded, but I can’t imagine that those metal tacks are supposed to stay there in use. And it seems to me that they’re responsible for almost all of your issues, including chattering and adjustment. The drawing supplied by Slemi sure suggests that the blade is bedded directly on the wood, which is about the only way that makes sense in any case.

I’d suggest you call a retailer that sells them and ask. Lee Valley sells them and their customer service is so good that I bet they’ll answer your question even though you didn’t buy it from them.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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jdh122

879 posts in 2284 days


#3 posted 08-12-2015 01:04 PM

A bit of hunting came up with this post on another forum:

http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=&Number=6928845&page=&view=&sb=5&o=&fpart=all&vc=1

Seebea1 recounts how he removed the buttons and found the plane worked better. I guess the metal “tacks” are part of the original design.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#4 posted 08-12-2015 01:19 PM

It’s only been about 20 hours since bobasaurus posted this question.

These are the instructions found with one of my ECE Primus planes.

I would not attempt to remove the ‘tacks’ or otherwise tamper with this plane. The instructions show how to compensate for blade placement problems. There is indeed a somewhat complicated process for dialing in correct cutter height/parallelism through balanced, specific adjustments, beyond what you’d do for a conventional metal plane.

Any specific questions, bobasaurus, I’ll try to help….hope the prints are readable on your device. Let me know by PM, if necessary.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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bobasaurus

2675 posts in 2651 days


#5 posted 08-12-2015 06:52 PM

Jeremy, thanks for the form link. Sounds like the exact same problem and pulling the studs may help.

Poopie, thanks for posting the instructions but the font is so small I can’t read them. Does it say “a truss is formed”? I’ve never had anything but frustration using the “regulator”. How much do you tighten the screw of the regulator for proper movement and holding of position?

-- Allen, Colorado

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#6 posted 08-12-2015 09:27 PM

Try this:

Allen,
I was afraid my user’s instructions might be unreadable. PM me your email address and I’ll send the files to you.
It’s not possible to send files thru LJ PMs or I would have already done that for you.

Please don’t pull the studs!! My ECE planes work perfectly, and once you tune up the cutter assembly as outlined in the instructions, you’ll be quite happy with your results.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2675 posts in 2651 days


#7 posted 08-12-2015 10:28 PM

Thanks poopie. Also, is the cross pin on the tensioning rod supposed to have a bigger chamfer on one side? I always assumed this was a machining flaw on mine, but by your instructions it seems maybe intentional.

-- Allen, Colorado

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