LumberJocks

Buy and Build Once Workshop - Help!?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Ted Ewen posted 08-10-2015 08:39 AM 1106 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


08-10-2015 08:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shop shop design advice tools

Hi,

I’m pushing 50 and, by way of raising chickens (and so needing coops), I find myself having been bitten by the woodworm. I have almost zero knowledge, but I am learning quickly. We live on just 0.20 acre in Denmark, so my available space is limited. My wife is in complete agreement on the need for and expenditure on one Wood shop, hybrid, European, fully equipped.

To start with, I will be buying the Bosch 12” GDL double bevel mitre saw. The vast majority of my immediate need is for cross- and bevel- cuts and this saw seems like it will meet any of my own needs. It’s large enough to handle some sizable material and precise enough to handle any smaller work I’ll need to do. next is a Bosh blue router kit for both plunge and fixed work.

This is where my confidence fails me.

I’ve made a list of all the tools I think I want in the shop:

Tablesaw: not a table top saw, but a permanent fixture.
Bandsaw: 14 and 24”
Jointer
Planer
Deep drill press
Thickness sander
Oscillating spindle sander
Belt and disc sanders
Mortiser
Lathe
Compressor
Dust Extraction
Sharpening System

plus various hand and power-hand tools.

In most cases my thinking is the more capacity the better but I would like to ensure that the upper capacity limits make sense when taken together. No use having a tool that can handle more than the rest – is there?

I’ve tried doing some research online, but much of the information is North American in nature. I can find Powermatic through a supplier in Russia, but Russia. I’ve heard good things about Scheppach from Germany (http://www.scheppach.com/en/home.html). I have been ballparking things at about €1200 a machine for the most part – is that a reasonable estimate?

Oh, I also have to either build or convert a space for all of this to fit in, with ancillary spaces for those activities which warrant isolation. I’ve been looking at prefab steel structures, but am open to suggestions.

So, that’s a lot to take into account and on board. I’d love any and all advice, resources, insights, or warnings that come to mind. I have no local connections for this sort of information so I hope, with your help, to come up with that optimal design twice, build once shop that will serve me for the rest of my autumn years.

Please, do not hesitate to point out the obvious. It’s not obvious to me :D

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.


17 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1777 days


#1 posted 08-10-2015 10:12 AM

Well a lot should to be based on what you want to build in your shop.

For example, if your going to process a lot of sheet good a nice vertical or horizontal panel saw would be nice. If you’re going to make cutting boards and jewelery boxes that would be overkill.

So what are you going to be building besides chicken coops?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1181 days


#2 posted 08-10-2015 10:57 AM

Sounds like you are quite serios about purchasing gear. At these times there are a lot of smaller shopt that close and others specializing so there are a lot of professinal grade WW machines for sale for a good prize. Go here and have a look: http://www.dba.dk/have-og-byg/vaerktoej-arbejdsredskaber-og-maskiner/?fra=privat&vis=galleri

This guy is selling a complete shop: http://www.dba.dk/snedkermaskiner/id-1015381546/
Or perhaps a combination machine is what you need: http://www.dba.dk/kombi-hoevl-scm-super-go/id-1015815570/

See, btw, that wee live close togeter. My shop is in Hedehusene. Come over for a chat one day!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


#3 posted 08-10-2015 12:08 PM

Well a lot should to be based on what you want to build in your shop.

For example, if your going to process a lot of sheet good a nice vertical or horizontal panel saw would be nice. If you re going to make cutting boards and jewelery boxes that would be overkill.

So what are you going to be building besides chicken coops?

- AlaskaGuy


I see building a lot of outdoorsy / homesteady stuff. I can also see moving into more rustic furnishings and accessories. I do not think I will ever go for fine cabinetry but never is a very long time. Siege engines are on the list too. I’ve been wanting to build a good car sized catapult for decades now. I’ve a permanent observatory to build for the telescope and gubbins, that will likely be on the roof of the house. Of course, then there are the outbuildings, decks, beehives, bat and bird boxes. A shop too unless I go prefab. The garage needs replacing and… yeah, so a little bit of a lot of things.

Sounds like you are quite serios about purchasing gear. At these times there are a lot of smaller shopt that close and others specializing so there are a lot of professinal grade WW machines for sale for a good prize. Go here and have a look: http://www.dba.dk/have-og-byg/vaerktoej-arbejdsredskaber-og-maskiner/?fra=privat&vis=galleri

This guy is selling a complete shop: http://www.dba.dk/snedkermaskiner/id-1015381546/
Or perhaps a combination machine is what you need: http://www.dba.dk/kombi-hoevl-scm-super-go/id-1015815570/

See, btw, that wee live close togeter. My shop is in Hedehusene. Come over for a chat one day!

- kaerlighedsbamsen

Oh, I shall indeed! I do not know many people around here, I am quite the hermit, but that is too close to ignore. When might be good for a visit? Desvarre mit dansk er ikke så godt. Er engelsk ok? :D

I really appreciate the DBA links. We found this house through DBA too, but I seem not to have the knack for it. Not knowing the dansk surely doesn’t help.

I just went through the Axminster site and ran up an order for 118 items @ £31,125.04. Man what a set of machines though!

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1181 days


#4 posted 08-10-2015 01:00 PM

Wow that is one big purchase. Did you actually buy them or just made a wish list?
Have sent you a PM

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


#5 posted 08-10-2015 01:05 PM

Just a wish list for now. I sure wish i had that much to spend all at once :D

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#6 posted 08-10-2015 01:56 PM

More than likely if your pushing 50 you probably have a lot of years left in your life – especially if you take good care of yourself.

I would do it this way:

First step: Buy a basic set of good hand tools. You can make almost anything with hand tools and no matter what shop that you end up with you really need a good basic set of hand tools anyways. You will also need a workbench and some sort of cabinet to store your tools in. These can be your first projects. You will also need a few clamps, and a vise, and some sort of way to sharpen your tools.

Second step: Buy a complete set of portable power tools. With the hand tools and the set of basic portable power tools you can certainly build most anything and will benefit substantially from the new added portable power tools.

Last step: Buy your stationary power tools one at a time, starting with the table saw. Setting up your shop in this way will not break your checking account and you will learn a lot in the process. Throughout the whole process you can keep your eye out for bargains and buy the bargains as you come to them.

While in the process you can also build you a shop.

This is just one way of accomplishing the goal of acquiring a shop. There are many other ways. To me, this is the most thrifty and maybe the most wise.

Just my two cents worth.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


#7 posted 08-10-2015 02:10 PM

I’m most of the way there on the hand tools. I have enough to do the basics anyway. There will always be room for more, but no pressing need for a large batch. I covet a number – I need a few :D

I’ve a smattering of power tools, all of the ‘hand’ variety. Again, there are many i covet here, but all I really need is a good router. That and the Double Mitre saw are the absolute next ones.

I was thinking a new bench tool every 6 months or so – somewhere around that €1200 mark, though I see some of them may take a year due to the cost. Table saw after that for certain, and the better the better. I’m tempted by some of the worksite saws, but the shop saws aren’t that much pricier.

Know any old, rich, celibate types who want to adopt a 50 year old? Sure would make this easier ;)

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23214 posts in 2334 days


#8 posted 08-10-2015 02:34 PM

This sounds very good, Ted. You will get there sooner than later and may you always be happy in your work.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


#9 posted 08-10-2015 02:35 PM

Thanks, Charles :D

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#10 posted 08-10-2015 03:38 PM

I’ve been woodworking for about 15 years. I built my first large display cabinet with a cheap job site tablesaw, miter saw, drills, biscuit cutter, handheld plunge router, thickness planer and random orbit sander. That was 14 years ago. I bought my first band saw 2 years ago, a jointer 3 years ago, spindle sander last year, drum sander this year. I think you are right about getting the miter saw first. I would say tablesaw next after that. I got by without a drill press for a long time, but looking back I should have bought one long ago. I’ve had a mortiser for about 4 years, but have scarcely used it. For some things, wait til you need it before you buy it. Have fun and be careful.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2362 posts in 2465 days


#11 posted 08-10-2015 04:02 PM

That is an impressive list. I have been doing this for forty years and I dont have all of them YET.
My first stationary tools were. Table Saw. Jointer. Compressor.Took awhile for bandsaw. Disc Sander.
Then much later
Lathe, Drill press, mortising machine,Dust extraction, (these were toys I wished I had sooner, when you have them in shop you find more use for them)
Kind of “you dont miss what you never had”
A real good work shop is also a must. Store those tools properly and have space to use them.
Good luck with your new hobby.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View TheOtherMrRogers's profile

TheOtherMrRogers

41 posts in 1649 days


#12 posted 08-10-2015 05:11 PM

Ok, I have a suggestion for you.

Don’t buy new gear. I repeat don’t buy new gear.

Find a good used gear source, (craigslist in the US, leboncoin in France, I am sure there is one in your country).

If I was in your shoes, I ‘d buy a used combination machine of some sort. For example (from France):
http://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/838675323.htm?ca=17_s

This will get you going quickly and for a low cost. But you have to be willing to deal with “Old Equipment”.

Just my advice.

Ray

-- For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?

View Andre's profile

Andre

1023 posts in 1274 days


#13 posted 08-10-2015 05:17 PM

The best thing you could do is go to Copenhagen and have a visit with Mafe. Look at his shop and listen to any advice he may offer. I find there is a lot to learn from most of the members on this site, if you do not like someone’s advice you are always able to learn from your own mistakes!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Ted Ewen's profile

Ted Ewen

187 posts in 534 days


#14 posted 08-11-2015 06:57 AM



I ve been woodworking for about 15 years. I built my first large display cabinet with a cheap job site tablesaw, miter saw, drills, biscuit cutter, handheld plunge router, thickness planer and random orbit sander. That was 14 years ago. I bought my first band saw 2 years ago, a jointer 3 years ago, spindle sander last year, drum sander this year. I think you are right about getting the miter saw first. I would say tablesaw next after that. I got by without a drill press for a long time, but looking back I should have bought one long ago. I ve had a mortiser for about 4 years, but have scarcely used it. For some things, wait til you need it before you buy it. Have fun and be careful.
- firefighterontheside

Glad to hear that I am on the right track. Much as I would love to do this all as one big buy, the monies just aren’t there. I reckon if i can firm up the contents of ‘the total package’ I will at least know how big a shop I need to build to grow into. As ever the fine line between need and want will come into play.


That is an impressive list. I have been doing this for forty years and I dont have all of them YET.
My first stationary tools were. Table Saw. Jointer. Compressor.Took awhile for bandsaw. Disc Sander.
Then much later Lathe, Drill press, mortising machine,Dust extraction, (these were toys I wished I had sooner, when you have them in shop you find more use for them) Kind of “you dont miss what you never had”
A real good work shop is also a must. Store those tools properly and have space to use them.
Good luck with your new hobby.

- canadianchips


I’ve been toying with the idea of converting the main house into the workshop and building a little mini-house out back. We only use a small part of the house for us and the living room would make a grand main workshop…. time to convince the Missus :D


Ok, I have a suggestion for you.

Don t buy new gear. I repeat don t buy new gear.

Find a good used gear source, (craigslist in the US, leboncoin in France, I am sure there is one in your country).

If I was in your shoes, I d buy a used combination machine of some sort. For example (from France):
http://www.leboncoin.fr/bricolage/838675323.htm?ca=17_s

This will get you going quickly and for a low cost. But you have to be willing to deal with “Old Equipment”.

Just my advice.

Ray

- TheOtherMrRogers


Thanks, Ray. If I knew more I’d feel more secure with second hand tools, but as a beginner warranty and after-sales support will be fairly important. Perhaps after the first couple of machines I will feel more confident. kaerlighedsbamsen found a couple of nice offers on our local version, DBA. Having a couple or three Danish woodworking friends will help a lot in this regard, I think :D


The best thing you could do is go to Copenhagen and have a visit with Mafe. Look at his shop and listen to any advice he may offer. I find there is a lot to learn from most of the members on this site, if you do not like someone s advice you are always able to learn from your own mistakes!

- Andre


I tried a search for Mafe here and got nothing. Got a link to his profile? You here in Denmark too, Andre?

Thanks again everyone. Your insights and advice are invaluable to me.

-- Show us a man who never makes a mistake and we will show a man who never makes anything. The capacity for occasional blundering is inseparable from the capacity to bring things to pass.

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1181 days


#15 posted 08-11-2015 07:13 AM

Look no further: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe
He is a great guy with probably the coziest shop in the world

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com