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i don't have a fence

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Forum topic by Duffman posted 08-09-2015 06:58 PM 975 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Duffman

61 posts in 791 days


08-09-2015 06:58 PM

Hey guys,
I just got a new to me Powermatic 66. It did not come with a fence. I have the large extension table and I need a fence. I have heard some rumors that the current biesemeyer fence has been turned into junk by Delta’s current owner. Any one have experience with them of recent? I’m not entirely sure what route to go yet, I am intrigued by Incra’s TS fence. What are your thoughts on which one to go with?

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!


16 replies so far

View Fish22's profile

Fish22

83 posts in 2576 days


#1 posted 08-09-2015 07:07 PM

Check out VerySuperCool tools or the vega fence. The vsc is a biesemeyer clone. Not sure if you contacted Powermatic but they may be able to help you get a new fence.

-- Bryan, South River, NJ

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#2 posted 08-09-2015 07:19 PM

If I was you, I’d be looking for a 52’’ unifence.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Duffman

61 posts in 791 days


#3 posted 08-09-2015 07:59 PM

@Fish22 – I’ve begun to look into getting a powermatic fence. Rails and fence will set me back about $550.

@AlaskaGuy – Why go to a Unifence? Not that I’m against the idea, I just figure there must be some reason that they quit making it… (even if it was just because it was cheaper to make the Biesemeyer) Finding a used one or NIB I think would be more difficult.

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 854 days


#4 posted 08-09-2015 09:57 PM

I bought the full-boat incra system along with my saw stop PCS. As a result, the saw stop fence (which is probably a fine fence) is still in it’s large box holding down the floor in one corner of my shop.

If it wasn’t for the fact that it would cost a small fortune to ship the thing I would try to sell it.

I added a router table on the left end of my saw, and use the incra for both. Love it.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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Duffman

61 posts in 791 days


#5 posted 08-10-2015 01:56 AM

@jeffp – so is it a pain to tighten down the fence, i’ve read that you have to tighten it in 4-5 places to fully tighten it down, is that really the case?

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!

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jonah

687 posts in 2761 days


#6 posted 08-10-2015 02:31 AM

I’d go with either the Verysupercool tools fence or the Incra system. The Incra system has neat capabilities, but it’s not for everyone. You really want to be building a big table saw station with that thing. If you want a more traditional fence, VSC is the way to go. Their Youtube videos alone are worth the price of admission.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#7 posted 08-10-2015 03:54 AM



@Fish22 – I ve begun to look into getting a powermatic fence. Rails and fence will set me back about $550.

@AlaskaGuy – Why go to a Unifence? Not that I m against the idea, I just figure there must be some reason that they quit making it… (even if it was just because it was cheaper to make the Biesemeyer) Finding a used one or NIB I think would be more difficult.

- Duffman


It’s beyond me why the new Delta co quit making the unifence. It must be cost because it’s a very good a versatile fence.
Actually the unifence is an European style fence. In Europe The regulations say the rip fence must offer two positions and be adjustable in length. There is a high position (50-90mm) and a low position (5-15mm). If you have seen a Delta UniFence you have seen a European-style rip fence. The high fence position, the one that U.S. table saws typically use, is for tall or wide work. The low position is for narrow work, allowing room for you to push the work through and still use the blade cover. European table saws have primarily right-
tilting blades and the fence in the low position allows the blade to be tilted toward the fence without coming into contact with it. With an adjustable-length fence, the fence can be made shorter, which is especially handy for ripping short pieces.

My reasons why I like, use and recommend a unifence.

1. You might say I was born a raised on the unifence. My dad was a carpenter, contractor and cabinet maker (much better that I’ll ever be). My dad could make cabinets with a hand saw if he had to. I was 26 years old before I got into carpentry and cabinet making. By that time my dad had a unisaw and of course it had a unifence on it. Most construction companies I worked for had unisaws with unifences. At my current job all are saws are unisaws with unifences. My home shop has a saw with a unifence and and I have a Felder sliding saw with a European fence.

2. I never could understand what good it was to have a lot of fence behind the saw blade when ripping lumber or sheets of plywood. I alway move the fence way back towards the operator when doing these cuts. With the fence in reward position I find it easier to get the lumber or plywood started into the cut straight. Lot of fence to get it started straight. If you’re ripping tension wood and it starts curling outward there is no fence back there to cause problems.

3. The two position fence, tall and short. Lay the fence on it side and it’d only 1/2 high at the very edge. This is good for narrow rips as explained above. When the fence is in its side position it’s kind of an backwards L shape. This is handy for cut up HLP (Formica) the material rides on top of the 1/2 part of the fence and butts into the fence so there no possibility of the thin sheets slipping under the fence.

Typically when doing Formica work your Formica overhangs the sub-straight. With the fence in the low position the Formica goes over the of 1/2 high part of the fence letting the sub-straight butt against the fence and you can trim off the excess without setting up a router.

All in all I think the unifence is more versatile and safer that the fences that don’t slide fore and aft and lay on their side.

The main compliant I have heard against the unifence is that it’s hard to attach jigs to. I would have to agree to that but it’s supper seldom I use jigs on a table saw fence. I prep most of my stock to be straight and square so I have no problems keeping where it’s supposed to be without hold downs and jig to hold the stock against to fence and to the table.

The sawStop was built with safety in mind. Why they didn’t put a European style on that saw is beyond me.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#8 posted 08-10-2015 04:03 AM

I have a bies. Incra makes great products. Heard great things about the adjustability of the unifence.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#9 posted 08-10-2015 04:03 AM

It s beyond me why the new Delta co quit making the unifence. It must be cost because it s a very good a versatile fence. Actually the unifence is an European style fence.

I’ve never heard Delta give a good reason for why they stopped production. I’m sure price played a part in the decision though, as it’s much more costly to cast and machine the fence head than it is to weld up some angle iron. Anyway, here is an article in Popular Woodworking magazine regarding safety and European style table saws. They mention the Unifence, although not by name:

Table Saws: Why the British Think We’re Crazy

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#10 posted 08-10-2015 04:43 AM

What this guy ripping with a euro style fence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQg6pgeedfg

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 854 days


#11 posted 08-10-2015 12:48 PM



@jeffp – so is it a pain to tighten down the fence, i ve read that you have to tighten it in 4-5 places to fully tighten it down, is that really the case?

- Duffman

Not the case for me at all. Most of the time I just use the one main lever. If I’m going to run a lot of stuff through at one position, or expect a lot of force applied to the fence (like ripping sheet goods where you’re pushing hard on the thing to keep it against the fence) I occasionally tighten down just the “driver’s side” auxiliary clamp. That’s pretty rare though.

Actually, now that I’m thinking about it, I can’t really imagine where the notion of “4-5 places” comes from. There just aren’t 4 or 5 places you could tighten??? The carriage that has the incra positioner on it has some knobs that let you move it, but it is pretty much just a “put it somewhere and leave it” adjustment on that end. There are some “stops” you can place anywhere along the rail to allow you to move that end between two well-defined locations and then tighten it down. Only time I need that is for moving it between table-saw position and router-table position. Takes all of 2 minutes to loosen, move, tighten. The stops make it so you don’t even need to re-calibrate after this move in either direction. Aside from this changing of operation between TS and router, this end is set it and forget it.

Just curious, where did the notion of “tighten it in 4-5 places” come from? I think somebody was “doing it wrong”. :)

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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JeffP

573 posts in 854 days


#12 posted 08-10-2015 12:59 PM


What this guy ripping with a euro style fence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQg6pgeedfg

- AlaskaGuy

That sure is a weird looking saw he’s ripping on. No table at all to the left of the blade (like the left hand wing is missing).

Also it looks like the fence ends BEFORE the blade. Very strange. I guess that would further reduce likelihood of a binding kickback. Just feels wrong though after many years of seeing the fence go all the way to the back of the table.

Looks like it works though. Got to give it that. Thanks for showing us there are variants out there that we rarely see here in the US.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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Duffman

61 posts in 791 days


#13 posted 08-10-2015 01:41 PM


What this guy ripping with a euro style fence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQg6pgeedfg

- AlaskaGuy

It is an interesting thought, I’ve always just sort of assumed that the fence continued after the blade to help keep things lined up, but clearly that does not appear to be needed. Also, completely off topic, I was also told never ever run end grain through a planer, is that still true or no?

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!

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Duffman

61 posts in 791 days


#14 posted 08-10-2015 03:47 PM

since the unifence is no longer available, does anyone have any experience with the Excalibur sliding fence?

-- I'm not addicted to buying tools or wood... I can stop any time I want!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#15 posted 08-10-2015 07:13 PM

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