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Forum topic by CTW posted 08-08-2015 11:54 PM 817 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CTW

48 posts in 778 days


08-08-2015 11:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question milling

First off I must say, if there is a wrong way to do something, not only will I find it, I will be good at it.

I am working with some dimensional lumber to build a safety gate for the top of my basement stairs. This is just a small (inexpensive) project that I am using to learn some basics. As you can see, I ran one piece over the jointer just fine, first the face and then a 90° side. Then I started a second piece and the results are the wedge shape pictured. I finally got smart enough to wonder why it was taking so long to remove my pencil marks, so I looked at it down the end and discovered my mess. This has happened to me before as well.

Can someone give me some insight?

Thanks, CTW


9 replies so far

View Dez's profile

Dez

1162 posts in 3545 days


#1 posted 08-09-2015 01:35 AM

Off hand _ have you checked for parallel cut?

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View CTW's profile

CTW

48 posts in 778 days


#2 posted 08-09-2015 02:49 AM

Dez, I thought I had this setup right, but since I don’the know what you are talking about I’ll have to do more research.

Thanks, CTW

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#3 posted 08-09-2015 02:53 AM

It’s very difficult to face joint lumber that starts off as 3/4”. It’s so easy to straighten it with your pressure pushing down that you’ll either not change the bow at all or get weird results. If you want nice straight 3/4” wood you need to start with 4/4.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7180 posts in 2045 days


#4 posted 08-09-2015 03:03 AM

Winding sticks may be of use.

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 986 days


#5 posted 08-09-2015 11:51 AM

Was the board in question twisted before you started jointing? Looking at this on my phone, it appears you are cutting the twist out of the piece.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 949 days


#6 posted 08-09-2015 01:16 PM

I think Waho and Joey are right on track that the board probably had some twist.

The way I deal with it is Rough cut to finished size then joint rather than joint entire board at once.
This reduces the amount of wood you will have to waste to get a flat board.

When jointing a twisted board i put put pressure on the opposite down sides as you pas it over.
Be aware you’ll lose a lot of thcikness so often times you just have to get another piece of wood

The lesson here is take time examine your stock thoroughly – not just looking for cupping or bowing.
It took me a while to learn to examine my stock before selecting and milling.

Make yourself a set of winding sticks. The are a very valuable tool and thet will “tell the tale” about your stock.
Any two parallel sticks about 16” long will do.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1198 days


#7 posted 08-09-2015 03:26 PM

I really don’t know why people buy what looks like dimensioned lumber, and then try to straighten a small twist in it. When the wood is attached to whatever is being made, that’s when you correct the twists, with clamps or fasteners of your choice.

I agree with some of what rwe said. ”The way I deal with it is Rough cut to finished size then joint rather than joint entire board at once. This reduces the amount of wood you will have to waste to get a flat board.”

I cut everything 1” longer, 1/16-1/8’ wider, joint one edge, then go back to the table saw, put the jointed edge up against whatever I using for my cuts, trim one end, and then cut to finished length. Next is to skin off the side that didn’t get jointed. When all pieces are trimmed on the one side, I bring up the fence and rip all to width.

You having the problems with your surface being cut at the angle shown might be that the infeed table was not secured and crept down as you made your cut with a slightly twisted board, but neither one shown looks to be twisted. Another thing to look at is your knives. Put a straight edge on your outfeed table, and turn the head by hand and see if the knives just barely touch the edge. If they are high or low, the outfeed table needs adjusted. If one knife is higher or lower than the others, that is a bad situation as something might have loosened and could lead to a dangerous situation.

What really scares me is that glove. ............. . Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View CTW's profile

CTW

48 posts in 778 days


#8 posted 08-09-2015 03:43 PM

Jerry (in Tucson)

Thanks for your input. I did do a thorough set-up on the jointer when I got it and it has run well for me. I will go through the steps again in case anything has moved. I think the board may have been twisted and I didn’t catch it. I am working on a shaker table out of hard maple with Marc Spagnuolo, and it was taking me so long to learn how to accomplish each of the steps as well as build jigs (months) that the legs twisted before I put in the mortises and tapered them. So I decided to use some wood around the shop and to build the safety gate and see if I could learn some of the things I need to know for Marc’s project; i.e., how to use the router, how to build the taper jig, how to mortise, how to cut tenons… I thought after I had some idea about what I was doing I would go back and work on the table so that parts aren’t sitting for months while I’m learning EVERYTHING from scratch.

Don’t worry about the glove, I don’t wear gloves when I run the machines, but I am pretty prissy about moving things and cleaning – so then I put them on. I am a rancher so I’ve worn gloves like a second skin for years, but when I setup my shop I bought a Sawstop so I quit wearing them when using tools – I did have to read about it – I did not know the risks until I did. I don’t have friends and neighbors who know anything about woodworking, so I work in a vacuum and it does take me quite a long time to learn – so I really appreciate you pointing that out.

Thanks, CTW

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 08-10-2015 01:53 PM


When the wood is attached to whatever is being made, that s when you correct the twists, with clamps or fasteners of your choice.

- Nubsnstubs

Not related to post but had to comment for newbies reading this.

If there was one absolutely crucial aspect of ww’ing it is stock prep. You must have parts that are straight, and true and square or the joinery and assembly will not go well. Sometimes this must include further correction as the project progresses.

For this reason, I do agree with the poster about keeping your wood oversized.

It’s because everything about a project – joinery, assembly, doors, drawers, the top, etc. has to be as true and square as possible. Forcing boards into alignment just causes something else to go out and this type of method will inevitably come back to bite you,

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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