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First project, Rustic wood box - Do I have the tools for this?

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Forum topic by The__Dude posted 08-08-2015 12:03 PM 819 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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The__Dude

125 posts in 525 days


08-08-2015 12:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joint plane rustic

This would be my first real project.
We want to make a box for our porch to hold some firewood.
Would also be nice to make it able to sit on.

I have some rough cut oak I want to use, but I will I need to join these smaller boards together.
The top would need to be joined on the length and butt joints.

I want the look of distressed/hand planed.

I just bought a table saw, will pick it up today.
I have no plans to buy a jointer.

Will the table saw give me boards that can be joined?

I do not own a hand plane.
I might need one for the joints? And I need one for the top?

Can you suggest a hand plane size/style I need?
Glue that I need?
I have plenty of clamps.


8 replies so far

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#1 posted 08-08-2015 01:56 PM

Dude, if you like the look of the surface of the rough sawn boards you could leave them that way since it’s meant to be rustic and on the porch. If you want to glue them together you will have to find a way to cut the edges straight and square to the faces so when you join them edge to edge there will be no spaces. When the faces are not flat that could be a bit of a challenge on the table saw but certainly possible. You just have to devise a way to keep the board from rocking, all through the cut,

Use water resistant or waterproof wood glue (Titebond II or Titebond III would work) and clamp firmly but not over-tight.

Another option is to not glue them but to cut strips to span across the boards, either inside the box or outside (likely on the side where the corner blocks will be). Screw them on and the box together.

If you’re set on planing the boards another poster may be able to recommend a plane.

Note : if this is red oak be cautious to locate the box out of the rain and away from any place where water gathers as red oak is susceptible to rotting. If it’s white oak you should stand in good stead as white oak is a good outdoor wood.

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rwe2156

2192 posts in 943 days


#2 posted 08-08-2015 03:08 PM

You can successfully joint boards on a TS with the use of a sled. You can search for plans.
You need the best quality rip blade you can afford. I think the glue line rip Freud makes is very good.

But as the previous poster said, why are you concerned about jointing the boards?

As far as a hand plane, I know I’ll get some disagreement here, but if I had to own 1 plane it would be a #6.
Properly tuned and sharpened I can get almost as good a surface as a smoother, but with the added benefit of flattening capability.

I would use simple butt joints.
If you really wan to go rustic I would consider using cut nails to put it together (make sure you drill adequate holes and orient the nail to the grain to eliminate splitting).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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The__Dude

125 posts in 525 days


#3 posted 08-08-2015 05:32 PM

Since I never joined boards before, I figure I could use this as practice.

This will be outside, but never get wet.

Is it possible to hand plane the boards to join then?
After I cut with the table saw?

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Yonak

979 posts in 984 days


#4 posted 08-09-2015 04:28 AM



ok ok… sorry :)

thanks for your advice.

with respect,
Pricilla

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- PricillaBannet

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The__Dude

125 posts in 525 days


#5 posted 09-09-2015 04:02 AM

If my rough boards have varying thickness do I glue them all them plane them even?

Should I use something aside from glue?
I have a pocket hole jig, but should I get the tool to do biscuits?

Almost every project I plan on doing involves glueing tops together.
So maybe I need a biscuit tool?

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13720 posts in 2081 days


#6 posted 09-09-2015 04:37 AM


Can you suggest a hand plane size/style I need?
Glue that I need?

Is it possible to hand plane the boards to join then?
After I cut with the table saw?

If my rough boards have varying thickness do I glue them all them plane them even?

- The__Dude

A jack plane will do what you’re envisioning. The Stanley No. 5 is a jack plane; lighter than a #6 (Robert was right, others will disagree with his reco, and still others will not think my 5 reco is good, either) so you can work with it over a longer period of time with less effort. That’s important when dealing with hardwoods and things like flattening boards. And it’s long enough to serve as a jointer in a pinch. It’s too long to be a totally effective smoother, though… For that, spring for your second plane: a No. 4. You’ll know when that time comes.

Titebond 3 is totally sufficient.

Yes, you can run the jack plane along the edges of your sawn boards and get them glue ready. Need a good straight edge and small square to ensure edges are true to the face of each board. Lots of technique sources on the interwebz.

Because you’re looking for a rough box, I’d glue the boards to have a ‘flat’ inside surface, and varying thicknesses shown on the exterior. It’ll give you the look you want without extra effort, if I’m reading your OP right.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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The__Dude

125 posts in 525 days


#7 posted 09-09-2015 11:19 AM

I have a small hand plane and a #5 and #8 plane.

But I think I need to pre-plane the boards to remove any cupping and twists?

Was also thinking of adding cross boards under the top.

I think I might need to rough plane the outside top. Kids will probably sit on it.

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The__Dude

125 posts in 525 days


#8 posted 11-07-2015 12:35 PM

I have some oak pallets, I pulled them mostly all apart and de-nailed them.
I don’t think this is going to work.

I think I have access to some rough cut cedar.
I was going to build a frame.

Dado groove the frame then slip in some oak pallet slats?

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