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Forum topic by Paul M posted 08-07-2015 09:16 PM 1341 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


08-07-2015 09:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw tablesaw

I got a used 9” saw (free) from a neighbor. Part number 11324140. Seems good, has some grime and some surface rust. This is my first table saw, and I would use for small projects (mailbox, birdhouse, etc). Is it worth cleaning and fixing up? I want to clean and grease the bearings, etc inside before I use. Any advice on that? Should I take the top off to clean up inside?

thanks all

-- Paul M


22 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#1 posted 08-07-2015 09:27 PM

Emerson built saw from around the 70’s… direct drive. Manual can be found here:
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=5468

They can be cleaned up pretty easily. It would be fine for what you are looking at using it for, and the price was right :)

The bearings are most likely sealed, so it’s better to just replace them instead of trying to rehab the old ones. From the parts diagram, it appears there are two on the tilt/raise shafts and then there will be a couple in the motor. They should be pretty standard and easily/cheaply obtained from a bearing supplier like Accurate.

To do a good job of cleaning it up, it’s best to disassemble. At that point, you might as well give it some paint since you have it apart. The level of restoration is up to you and how nice you want to make it. There is only one example that I could find over at the vintagemachinery site: http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=10277

Cheers,
Brad

PS: That original stand is a huge bonus!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#2 posted 08-07-2015 09:35 PM

Thanks Brad: I found the manual and picture there, thanks. And yes, I may end up restoring a bit, that is part of the fun. I have never worked on a table saw, should I just take off the top (4 hex screws) for best access?

-- Paul M

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#3 posted 08-07-2015 09:44 PM

I think it will be a bit more involved than just removing 4 bolts as I’m pretty sure the trunnions/motor is hanging off the table. I personally would completely disassemble it, but how far you go is up to you. They are not terribly complex machines and are pretty easy to figure out.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#4 posted 08-07-2015 10:54 PM

Never mind, I just needed to take the saw table off of the base and turn over. Sometimes the simplest ways are hard to see at first. It is pretty clean underneath, I may just need to oil the tilt and elevation screws and bearings, at least to see how well the saw can run.

Thanks again.

-- Paul M

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canadianchips

2362 posts in 2465 days


#5 posted 08-08-2015 01:14 PM

Price is right.
That saw will do anything you want it to.
Not sure if it will stand up yo ripping 2” OAK planks all day long, sharp blade and slow will cut them.
As far as cleaning, make sure their is no build up of sticky saw dust on trunion underneath. When you have them clean use a non greasy type of lubricant.
Parts from the 10: belt drive craftsman will fit, your table is 27” long ? Your miter guage has 3/4” slot, extension from another saw will help expand your cutting surface if you want.(just sayin)
Enjoy your new table saw.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#6 posted 08-08-2015 10:25 PM

Chips: I am not looking for it to do too much, so the size should be ok for me. But it looks like I will have to disassemble. I cleaned up the adjustment screws and bearings, and got those working smooth. Blew out the motor with air, fired it up and a bit of smoke after 20 seconds. Maybe motor bearings? it rotates smooth, but maybe a bit tight, I’m not sure.

Any hints on disassembly of the motor? Start from top, bottom. etc

Thanks all.

-- Paul M

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#7 posted 08-08-2015 10:38 PM

Does the motor have ball bearings or sleeve bearings?

Motors are pretty easy to pop apart. There should only be 4 bolts holding the end-bells on. Once removed, you can pull off the ends and rotor. I’ve found it easiest to tap on the end of the shaft with a soft blow hammer to get the end bell moved enough to use something to pry/pull it off the rest of the way. There are many other ways people are fond of as well. Make sure you mark the end bells/housing somehow, so you can put them back exactly where they were.

Cheers,
Brad

Edit: Crap.. I forgot you have that direct drive motor… well, sort of the same procedure but usually there are separate screws holding on each end, and possibly they hold the motor to the bracket as well (there are a lot of variations). Once you dig in, it should be pretty easy to figure out. If you can get a model # for the motor, you might be able to find an exploded diagram for it online somewhere.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#8 posted 08-09-2015 12:46 AM

is a craftsman ball bearing motor Class B E37845, 120V, 10 amp, 3450 RPM. I hope to find some time next week to disassemble.

thanks

-- Paul M

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#9 posted 08-29-2015 10:09 PM

Hey Brad and others: I got some time, the new bearings came in (but I’m disappointed they were made in China, the EBay notice didn’t say), and I am ready for assembly. I noticed that one of the stator screws was cross threaded, and my re-thread guy actually made it worse (he tried, and usually is good, so I don’t blame him). I don’t really want to reassemble with it. Any ideas where to get some replacement 10-32×5 1/14 flange screws? Part number 64373 is not available from Sears parts, and I’ve looked around. Or should I just cut some threaded rod to length?

Thanks much.

-- Paul M

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#10 posted 08-29-2015 10:55 PM

Bet if you go to a motor shop, they would have what you need laying around in their pile of dead motors :)
(I actually have a bunch of them from some old motors, although they are more like 9” long).

You could probably use a threaded rod… or alternatively, you might be able to find some at places like Fastenal, Grainger, McMaster Carr, etc..

Also, buying bearings from e-bay is not really a good idea as you found out… You can get fresh, quality bearings from places like Accurate Bearing for about the same price and know you won’t have to go through this song and dance again in a year.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#11 posted 08-29-2015 11:03 PM

thanks Brad. For the screws I have tried Fastenall, Grainger, etc with no luck. I will just grab some threaded rod for now. But I will start looking around for a good motor shop to start working with going forward.

Regarding the bearings, you are right. I should have gone to Accurate to start with, these are critical parts. Lesson learned, and will apply on my next project.

thanks again for all your help, hope to have it running soon.

-- Paul M

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#12 posted 08-31-2015 01:42 AM

assembly question, the motor diagram (link below) shows 3 of the thin, flat washers next to the bearing on one side. Is this correct? I only pulled one out during dis-assembly. Any ideas? Also, do the fingers on the special washer (sorry, don’t know the name) go towards the bearing?

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/craf...680/00001.html

thanks again

-- Paul M

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#13 posted 08-31-2015 02:21 AM

The link you gave doesn’t work…

But in general, finger washers are typically used to pre-load the bearing – which is a slip fit in the housing (and a press fit on the shaft). This allows for movement due to thermal expansion when the motor is in use. The pre-load should be on the bearings outer race, so the fingers need to be oriented as such. It’s not really all that critical which way they face to accomplish that, as long as it doesn’t touch both inner and outer races, or squish up against the bearings seal.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Paul M

95 posts in 771 days


#14 posted 08-31-2015 02:24 AM

reposted link:

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/craftsman-all-products-parts/model-62430/0247/0731750/00051680/00001.html

any ideas on what looks like 3 flat washers?

thanks Brad.

-- Paul M

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#15 posted 08-31-2015 02:32 AM

Looks more like a spacer, but it’s not all that great of a drawing… do you have pictures of what came out of yours? Best practice is to take LOTS of pictures during disassembly so you can reassemble exactly the same way. Also, keep in mind that you can’t always count on parts diagrams to be 100% accurate.. stuff happens.. things might get changed around slightly at the factory due to parts substitutions or some other issue and it doesn’t get reflected in the drawing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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