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Forum topic by Bergie37 posted 08-06-2015 02:07 AM 984 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


08-06-2015 02:07 AM

Looking for some advice from someone who has replaced arbor bearings in a unisaw. I have the arbor out and the nut and washer have been removed. I took out 1 set screw in the pully, I can’t find anything else that would stop the arbor from coming out. I have been hitting it pretty good with a deadblow and a peice of wood. Am I forgetting a step, or do you really have to hit it to get it to come out. For what it’s worth, the nut did give me a hell of a time, so I’m thinking it may just need some lubricant? Just dont want to wreck anything.

Thanks


18 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 08-06-2015 02:55 AM

The arbor should pop out pretty easily – usually with just a few taps with a plastic faced hammer. Check to see if the inner bearing (next to arbor flange) is coming out of it’s housing – It should stay on the arbor and pop out of the housing. If not, then it’s stuck and you will have to press the arbor through its bore instead (and then remove it from the housing later). There also might be a burr or buggered up bit where the set screw used to sit that is hanging up things. Liberal use of penetrating oil and persistence will eventually get it out.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#2 posted 08-06-2015 02:19 PM

Take it to a machine shop with the right kind of press. They will have all sorts of ways to support it while they are pushing it out. They don’t charge an arm and a leg for doing this and they’ll also put it back together for you if you have the bearings. They usually have a metal shelf near there press with all kinds of scrap bushings etc that they can use to support it in the press the right way. We had two machine shops in our town that I went to for something like this and usually just waited on it while they did it. We also had a machine shop in our plant but a lot of times we didn’t have the right way to hold it in the press. Machine shops collect things like this for that very purpose. It something isn’t held in the press the right way it can easily be damaged. You can also damage a piece by trying to beat it out.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 695 days


#3 posted 08-06-2015 02:25 PM

At least you made it that far. I am still trying to get the tapered pins out.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Bergie37's profile

Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#4 posted 08-06-2015 03:11 PM

Thanks for the advice. I’m going to give it a little more effort and more liquid wrench tonight. If I can’t get it, ill bring it and the bearings to a machine shop. Any idea (ballpark) what they would charge for doing this?

View toolie's profile

toolie

2024 posts in 2093 days


#5 posted 08-07-2015 01:38 AM

check out this unisaw restoration video:

http://blip.tv/popular-woodworking-videos/unisaw-restoration-part-1-sponsored-by-delta-2851146

and what that video series doesn’t address, these guys will:

http://www.sawcenter.com/unisawparts.htm

good luck.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#6 posted 08-07-2015 01:57 AM

I did some more looking around, and I don’t know how well you can see it, but there is a ring around the bearing in my first picture. Is that a “lock ring”? Does that need to be removed before pressing out the arbor? If so, how the heck do you get it out?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#7 posted 08-07-2015 02:53 AM

Yes, it’s a lock ring. No, you do not need to remove it to get the arbor out. You will need to remove it to remove that bearing however. You can usually get them to unscrew with a pin punch… or you can make a custom tool that will span both slots.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Make sure your pulley doesn’t have two set screws. Doesn’t look like it from the picture, but at some point in time, they went from just one set screw to two (or the other way around… can’t remember at the moment).

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#8 posted 08-07-2015 04:10 AM

If you want to break it, keep beating on it. If you like it, take it to someone that knows how to remove the parts you need replacing. A new replacerment arbor cost about 400 bucks. .......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#9 posted 08-07-2015 03:44 PM

I took it to a machine shop this morning and they put it in the press and could not get it to move. I’m really thinking I’m missing something that is holding it in place.

I’m considering just leaving the old bearings. I’m afraid I’m going to break something while trying to fix something that may not be broke. I’ve attached a YouTube link of the arbor spinning by hand. Should I just leave it be?
https://youtu.be/HYhYK5cMKqM

There was another machine shop that was willing to check it out on Monday. Maybe soak in liquid wrench all weekend and then have him try?

View Bergie37's profile

Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#10 posted 08-07-2015 03:46 PM

There wouldn’t be a set screw in one of the three smaller holes on the pulley, would there?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#11 posted 08-07-2015 04:09 PM

They sound crunchy… If you don’t replace them, you can wind up trashing the arbor shaft and/or bracket and spending a lot of cash to replace the whole works down the road (not to mention the poor cut quality due to run-out). The only thing holding the assembly together is the nut on the end of the shaft (#10) and the set screw(s) on the arbor pulley (#7). The bearings are a press fit on the arbor, and an interference fit in their housings.

From your initial post, the nut problem could have possibly buggered up the threads and they are catching on the bearings inner race. You could try tapping the arbor back into place to give you some more clearance and then try cleaning up the threads a bit to see if that helps any. It shouldn’t be that hard to remove… it was designed to allow fairly easy bearing replacement since the bearings are about the only maintenance item on that saw besides belts and blades.

You might also want to ask the Unisaw gurus over at owwm... they live for this kind of stuff :)

Cheers,
Brad

Added: There wouldn’t be a set screw in one of the three smaller holes on the pulley, would there?

Not sure what holes you are talking about… most Unisaws I’ve seen use two set screws, one in each of the two outer belt V’s, and have blind holes on the opposite side drilled out apparently to maintain balance. Clean the holes out to verify you don’t have one hiding in there… that would definitely cause the problem you are having!

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#12 posted 08-07-2015 04:22 PM

It’s on the second picture, there are 3 smaller holes on the opposite side of the pulley. I’m assuming it is to maintain balance, like you said. I cleaned them out and didn’t find anything.

I’ll post something on that site. I’ll also try to tap it back in place and soak it good. If I don’t have success this weekend, I will try the other machine shop on Monday. The first shop seemed to have a tough time stabilizing the bracket to get good leverage, maybe the second shop has a different setup.

Thanks for all your help!!!

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#13 posted 08-08-2015 01:40 PM

Hey Berg, in my earlier reply I said not to beat on that assembly.

Do not use a bearing puller or beat on the threaded end of that shaft. It causes undue pressure on the other bearing and could possibly break the housing at that 7 o’clock position in that last picture. I know because I broke my arbor using a bearing puller at the first bearing. It was only a crack, not a complete separation, so I clamped it back together and took it to a welding shop then a machine shop for alignment inspection. I was lucky.

Anyway, sometime before getting it to the welding shop, I finally found info on how to remove the bearings PROPERLY. There is a procedure you have to go through. I can’t remember where I got the info from or I would have posted it in the first reply. You just have to keep asking and hunting until you find how to remove them without damaging anything…........ I hope I’m not too late…......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Bergie37

24 posts in 520 days


#14 posted 08-09-2015 04:00 PM

Do you guys think that heat or cold would help things move a bit? I couldn’t get the shaft to move either way…

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

197 posts in 2829 days


#15 posted 08-09-2015 07:26 PM

I have a Unisaw, but haven’t changed the bearings yet. Looking at the first picture and then at the assembly drawing it looks like there may be a spanner sleeve (#8) holding the bearing in. Notice the 2 holes on opposite sides in the first photo (10 oclock and 4 oclock). If you don’t have a spanner wrench to fit, try tapping it counter clockwise with a drift punch to see if it unscrews. I’m watching this thread closely to learn how to do mine.

Charley

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