LumberJocks

my first question :) please help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by mark50 posted 08-05-2015 04:14 PM 897 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


08-05-2015 04:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question jig router

hey guys i want to make this pattern on my wall at home…any suggestions on how to do it? this is designed to be individual pieces that fit together like a puzzle!

thanks guys!


15 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#1 posted 08-05-2015 04:16 PM

I think Home Depot has tiles that can produce that shape. Unless you want to make it out of wood.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#2 posted 08-05-2015 06:57 PM

yea it has to be wood :) i was thinking of doing it with a router and doing the design straight on wood and not make individual pieces… my problem is making a good jig… any other ideas guys?

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#3 posted 08-05-2015 07:14 PM

So, the 4 big +’s can be made out of one long piece of wood cut at 45 degrees on all 4 sides.
The 5 small ones can be sliced from a square piece.
The same with the larger squares.. Sliced from a stock after the two edges have been cut to size via a simple jig.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#4 posted 08-05-2015 07:55 PM

@mrjinx007 “sliced” with what kind of machine? router? table saw?

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

821 posts in 2361 days


#5 posted 08-05-2015 08:11 PM

I’m not sure what you are indicating with the darker lines on your drawing, as they don’t seem to make up a puzzle piece? Start by making the 5 squares that form the small crosses. That could easily and consistently be made by taking a square piece of wood maybe a foot long and slicing 1/4” sections off the end with a table saw. Assemble them to form the 5-cross. The larger squares could be cut from plywood or whatever and then cut off opposite corners to fit the sides of the previous squares. Those pieces will then let you make the longer pieces that make up the larger cross. Table saw would be best for making straight cuts and rips.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#6 posted 08-05-2015 10:48 PM

thanks a lot! I’m thinking also of not making it puzzle pieces… what if i just put the design straight on the wood with a router? would that be easier? my problem is how can i make a good jig for that so the lines can be perfect?

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#7 posted 08-05-2015 11:22 PM

Work out the dimensions, cut the pieces, route a chamfer, piece together…....

What’s the problem? ;-)

Seriously, I’d start with the biggest squares first and work out the smaller sized from it.

You’ll need a jig or stop block to duplicate the pieces.

Key to this type of thing: don’t work from calcualated dimensions, work from reality.

And sneak up on it!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#8 posted 08-05-2015 11:46 PM

thanks rwe2156!! :)

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#9 posted 08-06-2015 05:17 AM



Work out the dimensions, cut the pieces, route a chamfer, piece together…....

What s the problem? ;-)

Seriously, I d start with the biggest squares first and work out the smaller sized from it.

You ll need a jig or stop block to duplicate the pieces.

Key to this type of thing: don t work from calcualated dimensions, work from reality.

And sneak up on it!!

- rwe2156

what degree chamfer bit do you think this would be? I’m still a beginner with routers so I’m not sure. thanks

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 08-06-2015 02:14 PM

45 degrees ought to work

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#11 posted 08-06-2015 02:35 PM

thanks again! if i end up doing this ill post my results!

View GregD's profile

GregD

783 posts in 2602 days


#12 posted 08-06-2015 02:54 PM



Work out the dimensions, cut the pieces, route a chamfer, piece together…....

What s the problem? ;-)

Seriously, I d start with the biggest squares first and work out the smaller sized from it.

You ll need a jig or stop block to duplicate the pieces.

Key to this type of thing: don t work from calcualated dimensions, work from reality.

And sneak up on it!!

- rwe2156

These are not easy or obvious tasks for someone with little experience.

There are 2 very different strategies:
A). Make a bunch of little pieces to fit together
B). Route the pattern into one large piece

The challenge with option B is the large piece. Solid wood probably requires a glue up which is not so easy if you haven’t done it before. Plywood is stable but the grooves will expose the plys. Also ,the grain will be in one direction whereas in the picture it aligns with the long dimension of each piece and this adds a nice looking effect. Even with this option there are different strategies on how to accurately machine this pattern. Trivial with a CNC I imagine but otherwise a significant challenge if you haven’t done anything like it before.

Option A is probably the way to go, but this isn’t trivial because, like a box joint, small errors are going to get multiplied over many copies of the pattern. A strategy to handle that is to plan on gluing the pieces to a stable substrate allowing for tiny gaps between the pieces. As the gaps are at the bottom of relatively deep grooves they will be not so noticeable if everything is the same color and especially if the color is dark.

With clever planning there is probably a good way of cutting out these pieces on a table saw to get consistent sizes. But this is going to work out better for someone with enough experience to get consistently good cuts on a table saw, and might be a challenge for someone with little experience. It would require less experience and skill to make a template of each piece out of 1/4” hardboard and then use those with a flush trim bit to get the small pieces machined to consistent size. That is going to be very slow going, but probably not very stressful.

My choice would be to try the table saw route.

-- Greg D.

View GregD's profile

GregD

783 posts in 2602 days


#13 posted 08-06-2015 03:00 PM

However you decide to do this consider practicing your method using 1/4” tempered hardboard (smooth on both sides; typically available and lumber yards but not always at big-box home improvement places).

-- Greg D.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#14 posted 08-06-2015 06:40 PM

+1 GregD
Even on the picture, if you look at the two large +’s you can see one gap on the top one and 3 gaps on the bottom one. Those are going to be inevitable and if you try to correct them, it will make huge mess of the overall project.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mark50's profile

mark50

8 posts in 492 days


#15 posted 08-09-2015 05:10 AM

thanks a lot GregD and mrjinx007! ill take all this into consideration!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com