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Craftsman 113 Motor Upgrade 1.5hp or 2hp

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Forum topic by Heraldj07 posted 08-04-2015 07:06 PM 835 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


08-04-2015 07:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman 113 motor horsepower cast iron hardwood

I just purchase a 113 on CL for $90. the saw is in great shape needs very little TLC. I know everyone suggests upgrading the Fence to a T2 but my first upgrade will be the drive motor. My first saw was a Makita 2703 that from what i understand is a 2hp (15amps at 110v) that little saw has plenty of power to rip right through hardwoods. I am currently in the middle of making mass amounts of cutting boards for gifts and general hobby but find the new old 113 saw to bog almost to a stop when cutting 2” or 3” hardwoods. Everything has been aligned with a dial indicator down to the .005 so i don’t think that is my problem. New blade and everything. Measure in front and behind the blade to fence.

My thought is to upgrade the motor to have the torque needed to cut what im trying to cut. I work for a Motor distributor that can get Leeson sealed continuous duty motors for less than HF motors with a 1 year warranty. Now my biggest concern is power and tilt.

Power: From my research anything at or above 2hp will require a 220v feed. Not a huge deal but i would like to stick to 110v.

Tilt: All this extra power will be heavy. 2hp being 32lbs+ and the 113 saw tilt mech. has to lift that weight. Any thoughts?


20 replies so far

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JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#1 posted 08-04-2015 07:23 PM

Comparing to your Makita is apples to oranges. The Makita was a jobsite saw with a universal motor, the Craftsman has an induction motor. Universal motors make HP by running at high speeds with low torque. An induction motor will have more torque and a lower speed. (BTW, there is no way your Makita was making 2HP. The most you can expect with a 15A motor is 1-1/2HP)

So, couple of questions. There were a ton of different 113 models put out. Which one do you have and what motor is on it now?

What is the new blade on the Craftsman? A good quality, thin kerf ripping blade will make the most of the saw’s performance. A lesser quality or full kerf blade will struggle with thicker hardwoods, as will one with too many teeth. For ripping, I use a 24 tooth Freud Diablo on my 113 with no real problems. Thicker hardwood requires slowing the feed rate, but it’ll still do the work.

Is the .005 alignment of the fence in or out? In other words, the back of the fence should be parallel to slightly farther from the blade to prevent pinching. If the fence is closer to the blade in the back, even by .005, that’s enough to pinch and bog down. Personally that’s about twice the amount I would want on my saw, but as long as its the right direction, won’t cause an issue.

Did you check the pulley alignment and belt? If the pulleys are out of line with each other, that will eat up quite a bit of power.

If you do replace the motor, I’d be very hesitant to go with something larger and heavier than stock. I don’t think the construction of the saw is really up to it. A 1-1/2HP motor should do anything you need with a good blade.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


#2 posted 08-04-2015 07:36 PM

Wow thanks. A lot of great info here.
The blades on the makita and the 113 are the same. I will get the full The full model number when I get back to thethe garage. The .005 was for the miter slots to the blade. In this case I was using the fence so its irrelevant.

The blade is an avanti pro 60tooth finish blade. Like I said I have no problems with the makita using the same blade.

I will reply with pics. Previous owner did change around a few things.

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JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#3 posted 08-04-2015 08:15 PM

The blade is an avanti pro 60tooth finish blade. Like I said I have no problems with the makita using the same blade.

- Heraldj07

There’s at least part of the issue. A 60 tooth blade is for crosscutting, you need a good ripping blade. The reason the Makita was able to make the 60T blade work is right here:

Universal motors make HP by running at high speeds with low torque.

The higher speed is able to clear the chips fast enough to not bog down in this instance. It produces a lot of friction, though, and can burn the wood very easily. It’s also very hard on the motor.

Not saying there isn’t a possible issue with the 113, but simply switching to a blade that is designed for what you want to do will help and allow you to take advantage of the higher torque instead of high horsepower.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#4 posted 08-04-2015 08:42 PM

Those Avanti blades aren’t exactly top shelf….they won’t have that new car smell for very long. In addition to having a lot of teeth for ripping, it might be getting dull. $30 will get you a nice Freud Diablo or Irwin Marples blade made in Italy….better performance, longer edge life. For ripping, a 24T will make short work of things. For versatility, a 40T or 50T should do well on most tasks.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 08-04-2015 10:11 PM

If you want to stick to 120V you answered your own question, didn’t you?

Plus I wouldn’t think going from 1 1/2 to 2 on a saw like that would make that much diff.

I wouldn’t sink too much money in it. Save your $$ and get a really good fence.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1633 days


#6 posted 08-04-2015 10:22 PM



Wow thanks. A lot of great info here.
The blades on the makita and the 113 are the same. I will get the full The full model number when I get back to thethe garage. The .005 was for the miter slots to the blade. In this case I was using the fence so its irrelevant.

The blade is an avanti pro 60tooth finish blade. Like I said I have no problems with the makita using the same blade.

two things here the fence is not irrelevant If the fence is not square to the blade it could be forcing the wood into the blade overloading the blade and motor. 60 tooth blade is a lot of teeth on a rip blade.

You might try converting the sears to 220 if the motor is compatible most of thse 113’s were convertible. This might give you some more torque.
first I would square the fence up. The original fence on the 113 saw was hard to get square then would not stay square.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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MOONKNIGHT

5 posts in 486 days


#7 posted 08-04-2015 10:24 PM

Save the hot cash and get great fence!

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Richard

1898 posts in 2150 days


#8 posted 08-04-2015 10:50 PM


If you do replace the motor, I d be very hesitant to go with something larger and heavier than stock. I don t think the construction of the saw is really up to it. A 1-1/2HP motor should do anything you need with a good blade.

- JayT


With all the advances in electric motor design and new materials since some of the older saws were made, is it possible to find a higher HP motor the same size and speed that is lighter than the original that would still fit on the original mountings?
Mostly wondering because I have an Old Rockwell saw that has an upgraded 2 HP motor on it and it runs just fine but it is pretty heavy and I have to remove it every time I move the saw from inside to outside or vice a versa just to fit thru the door.

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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


#9 posted 08-04-2015 11:01 PM

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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


#10 posted 08-04-2015 11:04 PM

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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


#11 posted 08-05-2015 02:32 AM

So as you can see this is a 113.298032 .
I never really put much thought into the blade. So I take it during bigger projects you would change the blades several times?

I am going to check to see if I can get a 1.5 hp motor that weighs the same or close to the factory.1hp. If it’s close o will get it and update my thread.

If the makita is a higher rpm than the 3460rpm factory, isn’t that exceeding the blades max rpm? I want to say my makita says 4k+ rpm on the front plate.

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JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#12 posted 08-05-2015 02:41 AM

Most universal motor saws spin around 5000 rpm. Don’t know about your specific saw, but the newer Makita 2705 runs at 4800 rpm.

Yes, I change blades on projects, when neccesary. Most of the time I leave a 50 tooth combination blade in and use it for crosscuts and any rips it can handle (4/4 or less thickness, shorter lengths and few in number). If doing a lot of ripping or ripping thick stock, I switch to the 24 tooth blade. Only takes a minute and makes life much easier for both the saw and operator.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Heraldj07

7 posts in 508 days


#13 posted 08-05-2015 02:45 AM

When making cutting boards, once ropped and stacked, would it be considered a rip or crosscut? Think of the end grain sticking up.

Also I have looked around for a riving knife for this saw with no luck are the microjig mini recommended on this saw assuming a zero clearance insert?

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JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#14 posted 08-05-2015 02:49 AM


With all the advances in electric motor design and new materials since some of the older saws were made, is it possible to find a higher HP motor the same size and speed that is lighter than the original that would still fit on the original mountings?

- Richard

Honestly, I have no idea—don’t know enough about replacement motors. My concern is that on the 113 saws there is no lock to hold the motor, it just hangs off the belt to the rear to provide proper tension. Using a motor that is much heavier or lighter will affect that and therefore, performance. If using a heavier one, it could have bad consequences for bearings and other parts that aren’t designed for that much weight and force.

Additionally, on saws like this one and mine, the tilt mechanism is just attached to the sheet steel of the right side. On mine, the side already flexes when the blade is tilted and I’d be scared to put more stress on that part. (Note to self: Quit putting off reinforcing that side)

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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JayT

4772 posts in 1671 days


#15 posted 08-05-2015 02:51 AM



When making cutting boards, once ropped and stacked, would it be considered a rip or crosscut? Think of the end grain sticking up.

Also I have looked around for a riving knife for this saw with no luck are the microjig mini recommended on this saw assuming a zero clearance insert?

- Heraldj07

Rip. If you are cutting across the end grain, it’s a crosscut. If the endgrain is up and down or front to back, then it’s a rip.

Ashamed to say I have no idea. I don’t have any kind of riving knife or splitter on my saw. I’d think a microjig could work well, though.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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