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Reflatten a Stanley Transitional Plane?

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Forum topic by Gatsby1923 posted 10-25-2009 07:25 AM 3100 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gatsby1923

39 posts in 2606 days


10-25-2009 07:25 AM

I picked up a really nice condition Stanley #33 Transitional Jointer. Problem is while it has been nicely taken care of it also has a concave shape to the wooden sole from jointing many narrow boards in it’s life time. I have flattened and lapped the sole of a few all metal bench planes, but am a bit worried about doing this one a wooden soled plane. Part of me says run it through my jointer. Another other part of me says to flatten it with sandpaper like i would a metal plane. The other little part of me says it is time to retire that old workhorse of a plane…

Any ideas or suggestions?

Dave M

-- I don't know where I'm going but I'm on my way!


9 replies so far

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#1 posted 10-25-2009 07:25 PM

Either way using a plane or jointer will possibly make the throat area wider on your plane . This should be fine unless a great amount of wood has to be removed.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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cstrang

1829 posts in 2636 days


#2 posted 10-25-2009 07:43 PM

If it was me I would probably opt for the sand paper, like you would do with a metal plane.

-- A hammer dangling from a wall will bang and sound like work when the wind blows the right way.

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Rick Boyett

167 posts in 2680 days


#3 posted 10-25-2009 08:06 PM

Use Sandpaper…

However, be aware that you’ll also be widening the mouth of the plane as you take off material. You might have to make a mouth piece to close up the gap…

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3565 days


#4 posted 11-04-2009 06:54 AM

If your looking for information on how to close the gap check out the following book.

Restoring, Tuning & Using Classic Woodworking Tools (Hardcover) by Michael Dunbar

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Julian

880 posts in 2993 days


#5 posted 11-04-2009 03:07 PM

Just put some sandpaper on a flat surface and go to town on it by running it back and forth till it’s flat. The throat can always be cut out and made smaller by inlaying a new piece of wood and making the opening the size you want. I saw a tutorial on this process but I can’t remember where I saw it.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3565 days


#6 posted 11-04-2009 04:22 PM

Some more info here on the process.

http://workshop.tjmahaffey.com/planes3.php

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Roper

1370 posts in 3181 days


#7 posted 11-04-2009 06:58 PM

i would have to agree that sand paper would be the best way to go, but do you really plan on using this plane, if not it may be nicer to give it a good home on the shelf. just my 2 cents. have fun.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3565 days


#8 posted 11-04-2009 07:20 PM

Another way to do it is using a jointer plane upside down in a bench vice….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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rustedknuckles

160 posts in 3220 days


#9 posted 11-04-2009 10:05 PM

Retire the old brute, give it a nice wax job and a place of honor in the shop and admire it (I’ve got a #32 doing just that duty). Ya got a jointer right? It cost alot of money right? Its accurate right? Use that.

-- Dave- New Brunswick

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