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Forum topic by yellowsnow posted 08-03-2015 04:40 AM 1918 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


08-03-2015 04:40 AM

Up to this point I have relied upon the wood shop of the university I was attending, as well as taking woodworking classes from the local community college for use of woodworking tools. Now I live in Reno where the local community college doesn’t have their own woodshop, so I guess it’s time to start my own tool collection.

I’m currently looking at getting a table saw. I don’t have a ton of money, or space, but I’m concerned about accuracy issues with a contractor’s saw. I’m wondering if anyone here has managed to get away with a portable Dewalt and what your thoughts on that are. Also, I found an ad on craigslist Power King model 282 8” table saw from the 1940’s looks like it’s in great condition. Does anyone know about these old saws?

http://reno.craigslist.org/tls/5139859019.html

Thanks!


23 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#1 posted 08-03-2015 04:58 AM

You will be better off with a contractor saw than with a benchtop/jobsite saw IMO. Larger cast iron tables and belt driven induction motors give you more capacity and less vibration. You can find the ubiquitous Craftsman and Delta contractor saws pretty easily in the $50-$150 range (+/- depending on condition and location).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Andre

1022 posts in 1268 days


#2 posted 08-03-2015 05:19 AM

That is actually a great little saw! Depending on what your needs are, like do not expect to rip up sheets of plywood but small accurate cuts will be no problem.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 08-03-2015 09:32 AM

The difference in footprint between the Power King and a full size contractor saw is pretty minimal….especially if you remove one or both of the wings, but the landing zone in front of the blade is substantially larger and more useful.

There are a couple of decent full size contractor saws in your area that I’d consider over either of those you suggested. Both are reasonable deals too:
http://reno.craigslist.org/tls/5152155634.html
http://reno.craigslist.org/tls/5122819560.html

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 943 days


#4 posted 08-03-2015 11:39 AM

+1 Brad.

I have nothing to add other than you haven’t given a budget $$.

If you have $3-500 to spend, there’s a good possibility of picking up a cabinet saw on CL.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Dennis Fletcher

467 posts in 2516 days


#5 posted 08-03-2015 03:17 PM

I use a Hitachi contractors saw with a stand. (On wheels when closed up, makes for easy moving/storing)

I have never had a problem with accuracy. It is a bit loud, but, I don’t find that too awful.

They are a couple hundred at the box stores.

I enjoy mine. I use it onsite to install kitchens and build custom cabinets/shelves.

-- http://www.ahomespecialist.net, Making design and application one. †

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#6 posted 08-03-2015 07:05 PM

Just to make sure we’re all using the same terminology here, contractor’s generally use portable “jobsite saws” these days, not a contractor saw.

Jobsite Saw (with leg stand):

Contractor Saw:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


#7 posted 08-03-2015 07:20 PM


Just to make sure we re all using the same terminology here, contractor s generally use portable “jobsite saws” these days, not a contractor saw.

Thanks for this, I wasn’t sure what the differences were. Up to now my experiences with picking and identifying saws has been “the one in that corner, and the one in the other corner”

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yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


#8 posted 08-03-2015 07:23 PM



+1 Brad.

I have nothing to add other than you haven t given a budget $$.

If you have $3-500 to spend, there s a good possibility of picking up a cabinet saw on CL.

- rwe2156

I don’t have much of a budget, it’s more of a “the less I spend, the less pissed off my wife will be” type thing. I might be able to get away with spending $300, $400 is really pushing it

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yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


#9 posted 08-03-2015 07:26 PM



The difference in footprint between the Power King and a full size contractor saw is pretty minimal….especially if you remove one or both of the wings, but the landing zone in front of the blade is substantially larger and more useful.

There are a couple of decent full size contractor saws in your area that I d consider over either of those you suggested. Both are reasonable deals too:
http://reno.craigslist.org/tls/5152155634.html
http://reno.craigslist.org/tls/5122819560.html

- knotscott

Thanks! You know you are dealing with good people when they are willing to go shopping for you. I’m following up on that Rockwell

View JayT's profile

JayT

4773 posts in 1673 days


#10 posted 08-03-2015 07:39 PM

Of the two Scott posted, I’d pick the Delta over the Rockwell. Much better fence.

Either one is leaps and bounds better than a jobsite saw.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6471 posts in 2060 days


#11 posted 08-03-2015 07:54 PM

“used for one project”

That must have been one hell of a project! Although it looks like a saw that you can work with, and the price is not offensive.

View yellowsnow's profile

yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


#12 posted 08-03-2015 07:58 PM



Of the two Scott posted, I d pick the Delta over the Rockwell. Much better fence.

Either one is leaps and bounds better than a jobsite saw.

- JayT

It looks kindof rusty….

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JayT

4773 posts in 1673 days


#13 posted 08-03-2015 08:02 PM

Consider the surface rust as a bargaining tool. It is easy to remove, while replacing a fence will run you at least $200.

If there is a big difference in actual operation, that changes things, of course, but the basic capabilities of the two saws are similar. A poor fence just causes a lot of frustration.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#14 posted 08-03-2015 08:04 PM

Of the two Scott posted, I d pick the Delta over the Rockwell. Much better fence.
Either one is leaps and bounds better than a jobsite saw.
- JayT

It looks kindof rusty….

- yellowsnow

Which is a great negotiation point… it’s so easy to clean up surface rust (or any rust really), but most sellers don’t know that – otherwise, they would clean it up before trying to sell it to make it look more presentable. Use it to your advantage and knock the price down.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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yellowsnow

9 posts in 1326 days


#15 posted 08-03-2015 08:09 PM

I can remove rust, what I’m concerned about is the rust showing that its been abused and I’m going to have problems with it down the line. But if you all don’t think thats the case…

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