LumberJocks

Joinery for thin table slats

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by Marcus posted 08-01-2015 02:32 PM 603 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Marcus's profile

Marcus

7 posts in 624 days


08-01-2015 02:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining

Good morning,

I am building an outdoor dining table. It will have thin slats (less than 1.5”) and the table will look something like:

I’m not sure how to attach the narrow slats. If they were wider (and fewer!), I would probably mortise and tenon them. I was thinking of rabbeting the slats and routing a groove down the end and middle pieces. Then just sliding the slats in during glue-up and use dividers to keep them separate. If I did it this way, would I need to attach the slats with anything other than glue? The slats will be 3/4” thick.

Or is there a better way to do this?

Thanks,
Marcus


3 replies so far

View 69BBNova's profile

69BBNova

341 posts in 1680 days


#1 posted 08-01-2015 02:58 PM

I can think of only one way that wouldn’t make me so nuts that it would wind up in a chipper…

I’m thinking drill and pin it from underneath with dowels…

Its a bit tedious but that’s how I think I would try/do it.

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2281 days


#2 posted 08-01-2015 04:03 PM

Your suggested way to do it will work fine with only glue. I would do a tenon on each slat (ie rabbet them, as you suggest, but on both sides). Glue in the spacers too. And use Titebond III just to be sure it’s waterproof enough for outside.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#3 posted 08-01-2015 11:54 PM

I would never build a table of slats for outdoor use. There are just too many joints that after being exposed to the weather, will do one of the following: joints will swell and crack, individual slats will warp and/or twist, or both. Sure, it’s looks great, but the weather will wreak havoc in no time. I have built tables using that kind of construction and it did not last long in an outdoor environment. Now if I were going to build a table for outdoor use, it would be made of teak which stands up well in the weather.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com