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Bandsaw Resawing Jig

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Forum topic by TomFran posted 10-03-2007 03:32 AM 22299 views 10 times favorited 38 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TomFran

2942 posts in 2738 days


10-03-2007 03:32 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw fence resawing blades jigs

Does anybody have a plan or picture of a fence (jig) that can be used for resawing on a bandsaw?

I would like to use my saw to slice wood into thinner thicknesses, but the factory fence cannot be adjusted for drift. I was hoping that someone could post a picture of theirs or possibly give me a link to a PDF file of a plan.

Thanks in advance.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28


38 replies so far

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2780 days


#1 posted 10-03-2007 04:53 AM

Hey Tom…I think I have one. I’ll go through my stuff. Shoot me a PM with your email address and I’ll send it out tonight.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6697 posts in 2723 days


#2 posted 10-03-2007 06:19 AM

Hi Tom’

I have two which I made which are rather simple, but effective.

The first one amounts to a fence board screwed to a table board. Both pieces can be 3/4” materials. The fence piece has a vertical block, about an 1 1/2” thick, with the front edge shaped to a half circle. Make the fence board as high as your saw will allow, or you desire. Mine’s about 5” high.

The table piece can be as little as 3”wide, and long enough to clamp to your saw top. This one does not need to be clampled to follow the blade drift.

I set the center of the rounded block just in font of the leading edge of the blade. Always keep you eye on the line just prior to where the blade is cutting. This detail makes a big difference in your cutting ability. If you watch the blade cutting AT the line, it’s too late to make adjustments in the travel.

The second one is basically the same, except there is no vertical block. Just an “L” shaped fence, which can be clamped parallel to the blade drift. Determine the blade drift by starting a free hand cut, trying to cut along a straight line. Part way through the cut, stop the saw, and mark along the edge of the board, on the saw table. Clamp the fence parallel to that line.

Hope I explained that clearly.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2706 days


#3 posted 10-03-2007 06:53 AM

Yep, Lee,
That’s the way i do it too. I just had to remodel my Kreg fence because it wouldn’t adjust far enough to compensate for the drift. I had to turn the drift hole into a slot. Now it works right but I need to bolt an auxilary fence on to extend the fence farther past the Kreg fence(it’s on a 20” Delta.). I’m having trouble with the re-sawn board wobbling as it leaves the blade.
Tom

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2904 days


#4 posted 10-03-2007 01:23 PM

pictures please.

Rick was just talking about needing such a jig. I just said “uh huh” .. but now I can say “here’s how to do it”. .. but I need pictures.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2727 days


#5 posted 10-03-2007 01:49 PM

MY fence came with a big mettle dowel that screws into it for resawing. Why not take a bit hardwood dowl (1” + ) and bolt it to your existing fence?

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2706 days


#6 posted 10-03-2007 02:04 PM

Dog,
That works as well. Kreg makes a re-saw guide that attaches to the fence. With the dowel or the re-saw guide it is necessary to hand guide the piece rather than just holding it against the fence. It works but is not as good as a setup that has good repeatablility. I made a wooden one and it works but doesn’t do quite what I want.
Tom

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2765 days


#7 posted 10-03-2007 02:28 PM

Here’s a plan for one I made a few years ago for a 14” saw.
I can take a pic of it if you are interested.

Bob
http://tnvalleywoodclub.org/Archives/2002/images/374_1_3.gif

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View alanealane's profile

alanealane

365 posts in 2634 days


#8 posted 10-03-2007 03:23 PM

The above plans for bandsaw jigs are FANTASTIC. As was mentioned above, there is nothing better for repeatability than a well set up fence. IF YOU WANT TO AVOID A ‘FENCE’ ALTOGETHER, Here’s one more idea to choose from:

First of all: Some people have heard of Magswitch, a company that makes extremely strong magnetic holders just for shop jigs and fixtures (they even make magnetic featherboards). The Kreg resaw guide can be bolted directly to this and then ‘stuck’ to any ferrous metal bandsaw table (I hope yours isn’t an aluminum table). THE DOWNSIDE TO THIS IS THE PRICE. The Magswitch (shown below) costs just under $40 and the smaller model Kreg resaw guide is just under $20.


Above photos courtesy www.rockler.com

BUT ALONG THE SAME CONCEPT——HERE’S A LESS EXPENSIVE ALTERNATIVE:
This appears in the latest issue of Woodworker’s Journal. (Send a message to my profile if you want a scanned picture of the page in the magazine).

Take a standard right angle welding magnet (preferably with an on/off switch) which is much cheaper than the Magswitch, and bolt a length of PVC pipe to it to make a curved resaw guide. This I would guess would cost less than $10 to make—I have plans to try this one on my b-saw. BELOW ARE A COUPLE OF 3D VIEWS I CREATED IN MY DRAFTING SOFTWARE—HOPE IT HELPS!!!

I HAVE NO INTENTION OF DISCOURAGING ANYONE FROM PURCHASING FROM EITHER Magswitch OR Kreg. It’s just an idea I read in a magazine.

HAVE FUN!!!!!!!!

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2738 days


#9 posted 10-03-2007 04:53 PM

Thanks a lot everyone!

Lee, Thanks a lot for the description of the jigs, but could you be so kind as to take a picture and post it for us.

Bob, I would love it if you would take a picture and post it here. I’ll bet I’m not the only one who will benefit from help on this.

If all of you L J’s could get your digital cameras out and take a picture of what you’re using, it would be extremely helpful for comparison of ideas.

Tom (mot), Thanks for sending the PDF file – I really appreciate it!

Now that I finally have a planer again, I want to start doing some resawing, but I’m looking for the most suitable jig to do that.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

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TomFran

2942 posts in 2738 days


#10 posted 10-03-2007 05:02 PM

Lane,

Thanks a lot for the pictures and the CAD produced drawing. That helps me a lot!

”Take a standard right angle welding magnet (preferably with an on/off switch)” - Could you explain in regard to this “welding magnet,” since I’m not familiar with these or where one might be purchased.

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2765 days


#11 posted 10-03-2007 06:14 PM

”Bob, I would love it if you would take a picture and post it here. I’ll bet I’m not the only one who will benefit from help on this.”
Hi Tom:
Heres a couple of shots I took a few minutes ago.
I stuck a piece of cedar on the saw blade backwards just to show how thin you can cut with the right tension and blade. The blade has to be dead on with the table or your cut will be a wedge instead of a slice but that goes for all of them.
bs-resaw-guide-1
The next picture shows how the pivot point adjusts up to the piece being cut and locks in the miter slot.

If you speed more than 4 bucks making this I will have to come and spank you! <vbg>
b

bs-resaw-guide-2
Have fun
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2738 days


#12 posted 10-03-2007 07:05 PM

Bob,

That is outstanding! “A picture is worth a thousand words.” That is a cool jig! So this is what you use when you resaw some lumber?

So, Bob, on a typical resaw, you would mark your stock on the top and try following the line? Is that correct?

If you were doing multiple cuts, would you cut on the band saw, and then take it over the the jointer and clean it up, and then resaw again, and so forth. Does that sound like the correct procedure?

That is an amazing picture of your resawing 1/4” thick stock!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View alanealane's profile

alanealane

365 posts in 2634 days


#13 posted 10-03-2007 08:20 PM

I apologize for the crude representation of a welding magnet in the CAD drawing. I found this welding magnet on eBay. Sorry I told you you could get one for less than $10——Try the local hardware store, a Fastenal store, or Tractor Supply Company (they usually have clearance sales on tools like this) if you have one near you.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

VIEW THIS ITEM ON eBay.

You should be able to find this WAY cheaper from a local supplier———even a flea market or yard/garage sale.
If resawing is what you’re in the mood for, I LOVE to use the Wood Slicer from highlandwoodworking.com
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
This is aviailable in 1/2” and 3/4” widths and in any custom length you want. The variable tooth pattern takes away the SCREAM of resawing thick stock and leaves a finish that requires very little sanding.

By the way, to BOB: ditto what Tom just said in the previous post—-”That is outstanding!...That is a cool jig!”

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2765 days


#14 posted 10-03-2007 08:38 PM

Hi Tom:
Thanks for the accolades- just trying to help.

Let me answer your questions above:
That is outstanding! “A picture is worth a thousand words.” That is a cool jig! So this is what you use when you resaw some lumber?

So, Bob, on a typical resaw, you would mark your stock on the top and try following the line? Is that correct?
Yes but I would run a short piece of scrap to make sure the top and bottom are cutting at the same place on the board.

If you were doing multiple cuts, would you cut on the band saw, and then take it over the the jointer and clean it up, and then resaw again, and so forth. Does that sound like the correct procedure?

Yes that’s basically the routine.
I am making a jig today to run the cut stock through the planer to just over the final thickness.
Let’s say 1/16” over. I will take the rest away with my sander.
I don’t do this for thicker stock but anything under 3/8”

That is an amazing picture of your resawing 1/4” thick stock!
Just don’t give me a 6 foot piece. <g>

Regards

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2738 days


#15 posted 10-03-2007 09:40 PM

Lane,

Wow, that “Woodslicer” blade must be something to put on the Christmas list!

If it can do that, I want one!

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

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