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Forum topic by Mr M's Woodshop posted 07-28-2015 04:32 PM 1323 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2533 days


07-28-2015 04:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection cutting board ros random orbital sander shop solution

I make cutting boards. Currently, I’m making a lot of them … and the hand sanding part of the process isn’t working for me.

I sand all surfaces to 320 grit, which means I’m generating a lot of fine dust. When I’m sanding, dust is everywhere.

Everywhere.

When I’m sanding, Pigpen has nothing on me. I’m surrounded by a dust cloud all day … even when I go into the house. My wife loves this part of the process, believe me.

I have a 1-1/2 hp dust collector, and use always use it with my larger tools. When I switch to hand sanding, though, it’s not set up to be helpful.

I use a Bosch ROS65VC for flat surfaces (love that tool!) and a much lighter Bosch ROS20VSK for edges. For a while I used the 20 hooked up to the big dust collector (overkill!), but that honestly didn’t seem to be that helpful. When I’m sanding edges, holding the cutting board upright, the exhaust of the fan in the ROS is as likely to blast the dust away as the suction is to pick it up.

I recently started using a DIY solution: a box fax with a 20×20 filter on the end of my workbench. See a photo essay on how that works, as well as a good idea of what my workspace in full sanding mode looks like, here: DIY: Air Cleaning System.

However, that low tech solution isn’t really solving the problem. Dust is still going everywhere. I’m considering building a down draft table … and running the 1-1/2 hp dust collector all day when I go to the ROS’s. I would just as soon avoid that day-long aural assault, if possible.

The second solution I’m considering is to ditch the on-board dust collection receptacles for the ROS’s, and going to a HEPA filter shop vac that’s attached to them. This idea is pricey … and another tool in a crowded shop.

What’s a good solution? What the BEST solution?

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com


22 replies so far

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 07-28-2015 04:42 PM

I bought a really cheap Stanley vacuum at a big box store..it was in the “middle of the aisle deal” for like 25.00. The hose is a smaller diameter and plugged right into my ROS ( PC) ....it works awesome…..way better than I could have asked for. I have a friend with a big dollar festool ROS and dust extractor….this is a back woods version of that.
Mike

View hotncold's profile

hotncold

762 posts in 1010 days


#2 posted 07-28-2015 04:44 PM

Henry, sanding dust was also a problem for me when I began making cutting boards. My eyebrows would get covered. I had a downdraft table that I made but it was only marginally effective.
I finally bit the bullet and went with a Festool ETS150/5 finishing sander and the CT26 dust extractor. The results were unbelievable. Virtually ALL dust was captured and my sandpaper was lasting much, much longer.
This is surely not a solution for everyone and there are certainly enough people who will balk at the initial cost.
For what it’s worth, I have long since got over that part and I continue to sand everything will almost dust free results.
I’ve had this system for over a year and I continue to be amazed at the effectiveness.
Whatever solution you come up with, it just has to work!

-- Dennie - Tennessee

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

1986 posts in 1311 days


#3 posted 07-28-2015 04:47 PM

A shop vac works perfectly for me. It has to do with low volume high velocity. I hook my shop vac up to the ROS and rarely have any dust around. I still wear my 1/2 mask.

I tried hooking my biscuit joiner up to the DC at one point and the slots were full of dust/chips. I switched to the vac with a small Bosch hose, maybe 1.5 inches. It sucked the whole joiner to the wood and leaves completely clean slots.

Look at the new Rockler hose with the soft/rotating ends. It makes sanding almost fun when the cord doesn’t fight you. I have my vac in a box under the table saw with a remote to start it.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1959 days


#4 posted 07-28-2015 04:52 PM

I have my Bosch hooked to my shop vac and get near perfect capture of the dust. I had to buy an optional adapter for the ROS that Bosch sells (this is a 3725) to hook to the 1 1/2” vac hose, even then I had to use a little duct tape….but it works really well. One thing to remember, at on my Bosch using the vac actually put a huge amount of down force on the sander. I had to cobble together a vent arrangement to avoid ruining my sander “loop” pad. Since then I bought a variable speed vac that is a little easier to use.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

331 posts in 1435 days


#5 posted 07-28-2015 04:59 PM

I use a Skill ROS I purchased at Walmart and my Shopvac with 1 1/4” hose. The ROS came with a filter, which works, however most of the time I remove it and stick the vac hose into the hole. Woks great! And low cost. I purchase the Skill ROS two years ago.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1954 posts in 1454 days


#6 posted 07-28-2015 05:02 PM

The best way is a shop vac with v HEPA filter hooked to your sander. Some sanders are much better than others in collecting dust.

The Festool is one of the best and one of the most expensive.

I would be very concerned breathing that fine dust and bringing it into the house. Sanding dust is very fine and easy to get deep into your lungs. I do not know what woods you are using but some could be quite bad for you.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1146 days


#7 posted 07-28-2015 05:09 PM

I use a shop vac with a bag to keep from clogging the filter that’s pretty much dedicated to that role with a hose adapter. The hose I have doesn’t fit the ROS very well and I have been wanting to pick up one of the new Rockler hose kits and try that. That picks up most of the dust but I still wear a respirator when I am sanding. Using the shop vac does make a difference in clean up but I don’t feel like it’s good enough to not wear a respirator.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1959 days


#8 posted 07-28-2015 05:53 PM

The comments about the filters got me thinking: I forgot to mention earlier I put a Gore Clean Stream filter in my vac.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3024 posts in 1263 days


#9 posted 07-28-2015 06:05 PM

I just got a new shop vac, a Ridgid 14 gallon 6 hp (peak) model, and when I have it hooked to my DeWalt ROS, I can see absolutely no dust anywhere. I’m pretty stunned. I have a stainless Shop Vac for years, and i always had a little, but this system really works.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

376 posts in 1080 days


#10 posted 07-28-2015 07:48 PM

I know the box fan/furnace filter is the DIY weapon of choice, but I have a jet overhead unit and you can literally watch the dust get sucked up into it. Another recommendation. If you are making cutting boards, you need a drum sander. I get it flat with coarse grit, run it through a couple times with fine grit to knock down the deep sand marks then I ROS 180, 220 and 320. Goes really quick with very little mess.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#11 posted 07-28-2015 07:59 PM

What if you put one of those big “funnel” catchers from your dust collector (like some folks use for a mitersaw or radial arm saw) at say the left end of your workbench. (You will be sanding in the middle) Then put a 20” box fan at the RIGHT end of the bench. The fan should push the dust cloud across you to where the big funnel will catch it (or hopefully most of it)
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 984 days


#12 posted 07-28-2015 08:04 PM

I also use a ridgid shop vac with hepa filter and bag. The vac model is wd4522. This vac is small enough to stash under a bench or table saw. The filter is not stocked at HD, I ordered it.

The ridgid hose kit they sell at HD for cleaning cars is flexible enough to sand and fit directly onto my Milwaukee ROS.

Works better than I had imagined.

View Mr M's Woodshop's profile

Mr M's Woodshop

394 posts in 2533 days


#13 posted 07-28-2015 08:22 PM


I know the box fan/furnace filter is the DIY weapon of choice, but I have a jet overhead unit and you can literally watch the dust get sucked up into it. Another recommendation. If you are making cutting boards, you need a drum sander. I get it flat with coarse grit, run it through a couple times with fine grit to knock down the deep sand marks then I ROS 180, 220 and 320. Goes really quick with very little mess.

- JimRochester

Yup, I’m using a Jet 16/32 drum sander to flatten the boards. I also use a DW735 planer on the edge grain boards that are under 13” wide, which does give me a very smooth surface as well. I haven’t tried switching grits on the drum sander yet; I’m flattening with 100 grit. Maybe I should mix that up a bit….

-- Henry Mowry, Santa Clarita, CA, http://www.MowryJournal.com

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#14 posted 07-29-2015 12:27 AM

I would suggest a dedicated down draft sanding table and a DC with some horsepower.

Sanding generates the finest dust which is the most hazardous to you and your families health. Small filters clog far too easily, especially those that go down to 1 micron or lower.

Think of this exercise as more of a way to protect your health than a house keeping chore, and your priorities may change.

P.S. Box fans with cheap AC filters are nothing more than dust generators.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View wiser1934's profile

wiser1934

498 posts in 2613 days


#15 posted 07-29-2015 02:09 AM

best system going is to use an oneida air systems dust deputy. hook it up to your shop vacuum . does wonders

-- wiser1934, new york

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