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Forum topic by Scherdy posted 07-27-2015 09:31 PM 637 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scherdy

4 posts in 1274 days


07-27-2015 09:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: project new newbie display bases router help question

Hi, I’m brand new to woodworking other than a quick class back in 6-8th grade in shop :)

We now have a garage and I would like to do some projects that go along with my other hobby, scale modeling and miniature painting. For most competition pieces, the miniatures or scenes are on a display plinth of some sort. Examples are shown below

These block would be about 2”x2” up to about a max of 3”x 3” on the top surface to get an idea of scale.

Knowing just enough to hurt myself if I jumped in blind I wanted to ask for expertise here before buying any tools I might need. A router? Do I need a table?

Would I just get a solid cube/block and then route the small trim pieces and then use a miter to cut 45 degree angles on them and glue them around the bottom or would trying to do this with a solid piece somehow be the smart way to go about it?

The other thought is have a cube sitting on a slightly larger flat piece that I would route the edges of?

Just looking for advice from the people who know what they are doing. Always amazed by the projects I see people creating here. Thanks for the help.

Nick


9 replies so far

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#1 posted 07-27-2015 09:38 PM

I’d just cut a square piece of stock a little larger than the block, route the edge with whatever decorative trim design you want, then glue the block on top… maybe with a screw through the bottom just for good measure. A router table would make it pretty simple. You can find good used router/table combinations used pretty cheap if you don’t want to invest a lot of cash up front, and if you decide it’s something you really like, you will be better able to determine what features you need if you decide to upgrade.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Scherdy

4 posts in 1274 days


#2 posted 07-27-2015 09:42 PM

Thanks Brad,

Anything I should look for when I’m looking at used router and tables for something this small?

Also to add on to the question – for pieces this small is there a good resource other than looking at lumber supply for pieces with interesting knots and inconsistencies in the wood like some of the above pieces?

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ksSlim

1204 posts in 2350 days


#3 posted 07-27-2015 11:43 PM

Depends on where you reside.
Many towns and cities have local sawyers (cut local harvest wood for sale).

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1756 days


#4 posted 07-27-2015 11:53 PM

I think a band saw would be good for what you do, both for this and just in your model making endeavors. And hand moulding planes and a good quality miter box. You’re a hand made guy – i wouldn’t go nuts with expensive equipment to make smallish pedestals.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 901 days


#5 posted 07-28-2015 12:42 AM



Would I just get a solid cube/block and then route the small trim pieces and then use a miter to cut 45 degree angles on them and glue them around the bottom…?

The other thought is have a cube sitting on a slightly larger flat piece that I would route the edges of?
Nick

Both are possibilities. If you look closely at the three pieces in the first pic, the middle one is sitting on a single piece of wood that has been routed on 4 edges.

The other two have molding mitered around them. Moldings can be made or purchased. Really depends on the look you want, and the tools, skills, and materials available.

A router table can be as simple as a piece of plywood with a hole in the middle for the bit, and some mounting holes for the router. Any straight board can become a fence. I operated with this type set-up for many years.

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TechRedneck

763 posts in 2317 days


#6 posted 07-28-2015 01:40 AM

A nice little router table would get you started. I used a small table top one for a number of years. Dedicate a router just for the table.

I would look at a band saw as well. You can cut molding by hand with a miter box, heck you can do most all small work with hand tools and save the money. That band saw will come in handy cutting larger stock to size, or cutting veneers if you have some nice figured woods, then go to hand tools like scrapers.

Doing small work and hand work, design an nice table and work space with some lighting. Don’t go nuts with the tools, as you progress purchase good quality tools as you need them. Half the fun of woodworking is researching new tools.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View Scherdy's profile

Scherdy

4 posts in 1274 days


#7 posted 07-28-2015 02:10 AM

Really appreciate all the information from everyone. Seems a good miter box is one thing that keeps coming up. What makes a good miter box from sub-standard ones? Anything I should look for in particular? I’ll also start looking at small band saws on craigslist.

Again, can’t thank you all enough for the help.

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TechRedneck

763 posts in 2317 days


#8 posted 07-28-2015 02:48 AM

You can start in the miter box thread http://lumberjocks.com/topics/36757

Look on CL or Ebay for some older models. Back in the day they did not have power miter saws and built a lot of fine furniture using a good back saw and miter box. Generally, something you would find at a modern big box store would be ok I would guess, but for your money, you can’t beat a quality old tool.

you can also look at making a “shooting board” and use a hand plane to cut 1000th of an inch off of a mitered edge for a perfect fit.

I have an expensive 12” sliding compound miter saw. I like it and use it often for rough cutting stock down to 1/8” or a little less then go the the shooting board. I do have an old miter box that is hanging right above my workbench and grab it for a quick cut or two. Usually you would have a couple sizes. Pick one that fits your work. A small one is all you need to get going.

If you are new, you don’t really need a big expensive band saw. If you are going to stick with small work then a table top one may do, however if you have some extra money go for a 14” floor model and be done with it.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1756 days


#9 posted 07-28-2015 11:26 AM

You want this type of miter box, not a rock maple or plastic version. Frame shops probably use them. Heck, you could get a lot of moulding at frame shops. Sometimes they throw out the odd pieces.

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