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Forum topic by axionn posted 07-27-2015 03:23 PM 1318 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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axionn

9 posts in 1741 days


07-27-2015 03:23 PM

I was recently sorting and re-arranging my stacked and stickered lumber supply when I noticed it looks like my air dried ash has some powder post beetles. There were some small piles of very find sawdust, some small holes, and, most telling, dead insects.

It’s currently stored in my dry as a bone, hvac year round basement, new construction with poured concrete walls. I also have walnut, qs white oak, cherry, poplar and white pine all stored together.

What are my options for dealing with this?

http://imgur.com/a/v5A2r


23 replies so far

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nkawtg

204 posts in 713 days


#1 posted 07-27-2015 03:30 PM

I don’t know what to do in your current situation, but here is a video that talks about how one guy deals with powder post beetles.

https://youtu.be/oblZMDcFr60

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BurlyBob

3665 posts in 1728 days


#2 posted 07-27-2015 03:38 PM

Don’t know where your located. Years ago I worked in a warehouse in Portland, Or. We had to stack cardboard boxes at least 3 feet from the poured concrete walls or they would draw moisture and buckle. I pretty sure your stacked lumber will do the same. You might want to seal the walls and floor if you haven’t already. That might help with reduce the bugs.

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#3 posted 07-27-2015 03:48 PM

Those beetles are rough on Ash. Most likely they will eat it all up. There are several ways to kill them; chemical, heat.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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axionn

9 posts in 1741 days


#4 posted 07-27-2015 03:50 PM

I’m in PA. The house is on top of a well drained hillside. The walls are sealed on the outside, and have an insulated moisture barrier pinned on the inside. I’ve never had any issue with water or dampness. Even when Sandy came through, I don’t think our sump pump had to run.

The ash where I’ve noticed them was the only hardwood lumber I’ve bought so far this year, so they had to have been in it before I brought it home.

I’m thinking about getting rid of the ash, and spraying down the rest of the wood with Bora-Care. Or maybe keep the ash and spray everything down.

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mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#5 posted 07-27-2015 04:00 PM

I would. Just burn it. From the picture, if you saw part of it off, you will see that it is most likely all chewed up.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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AZWoody

693 posts in 686 days


#6 posted 07-27-2015 04:02 PM

Those beetles are bad in mesquite as well.
I tried using Timbor but it really wasn’t effective. I think pretty much putting pieces in an oven or a kiln are the best ways to kill them.

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axionn

9 posts in 1741 days


#7 posted 07-27-2015 04:47 PM

The more that I think about it, the board that looked the worst had some bark on the one end. Maybe get rid of that, spray the Bora-Care on the whole stack, and continue to monitor. I don’t want to throw the baby out with the bath water just yet.

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soob

223 posts in 670 days


#8 posted 07-27-2015 04:58 PM

I wouldn’t be in too much haste. There are some powderpost style beetles that can survive and reproduce in dry wood, but most can’t. They’re probably just residual from when the wood was still wet. If you’re worried about small boards you can sterilize them by leaving them in your car on a sunny, hot day, if it’s hot enough. An afternoon at 130 degrees will kill most wood boring insects.

I don’t think bora-care stains, but it’s expensive and I have personal doubts about whether it will penetrate deep enough to kill them anyway. I would deal with the infested boards and just keep an eye on the rest.

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axionn

9 posts in 1741 days


#9 posted 07-27-2015 05:09 PM

I think the worrying thing was I brought the wood inside in April, it had been air drying in my lumber guys barn for 4 years. I’ve had projects going on so I’ve let the lumber storage area get a bit disorganized. I started to clean it up last week, I moved a few boards out of the way and they sat there for a few days while I had other things going on. When I came back to finish the cleanup, there were a few little piles of talc like saw dust.

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soob

223 posts in 670 days


#10 posted 07-27-2015 05:22 PM

No telling. He could be wrong about the dates, those boards could have at one point been in a humid spot like on dirt, a leaky roof, etc. Maybe check it with a moisture meter.

I am no expert, but I believe the larvae are tougher once they’re established, and that they can’t get established in dry wood, so they won’t be able to reproduce and that’ll be the end of them.

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axionn

9 posts in 1741 days


#11 posted 07-27-2015 05:45 PM

I’ve been buying from him for a couple years and have seen that pile before. Maybe since it’s in a barn here in southern PA (hot humid summers, cool, occasionally cold spells in the winter) the wood stayed wet enough for them to get in some of the boards.

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ClammyBallz

309 posts in 599 days


#12 posted 07-27-2015 06:41 PM

It’s going to be 96F on Wednesday, put the wood outside and cover it in some black plastic, it should hit over 130F under there and kill them off.

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soob

223 posts in 670 days


#13 posted 07-27-2015 08:03 PM

Clear plastic would work better, I would think. Put the black plastic underneath.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#14 posted 07-28-2015 01:34 AM

Powderpost beetles for sure infest dry wood. That is their MO. I would remove that wood from the storage area and the other lumber that you have there immediately and isolate it. It can take several years for the adults to emerge from infested lumber, so you can’t take chances with them.

Heat, as in a kiln, will kill all beetles, larvae, and eggs. Not sure that chemical treatment is cost effective. The wood may just not be worth it.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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soob

223 posts in 670 days


#15 posted 07-28-2015 05:03 AM

Most “powderpost beetles” aren’t powderpost beetles. And most dry wood isn’t all that dry. Does that make sense? Plus true powderpost beetles only eat sapwood, right? They might move into heartwood every now and then but the adults won’t deliberately lay eggs on heartwood boards.

I mean, if these things were as voracious as we imagine them to be, they’d be eating everything in sight, and they just aren’t.

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