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Forum topic by jn111 posted 07-23-2015 01:44 AM 1069 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jn111

3 posts in 1030 days


07-23-2015 01:44 AM

Hey everyone. I’m turning to you all for some expertise in choosing a material to make a project out of. I’m looking for a wood type product to build a box for some equipment that sees some pretty harsh conditions.

The perfect material for this project would hold up to being thrown around a truck/boat with 20-30 pounds in it, stand up to getting wet every day, be able to do this for more than a year or two, have some sort of workability with standard woodworking tools and joinery and be somewhat affordable. In that order of preference. So far I’ve thought of phenolic sheets, resin impregnated wood, full plastic sheets like delrin. What would be your choice of material for a project like this?

Thanks a lot!


17 replies so far

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 685 days


#1 posted 07-23-2015 02:00 AM

They’ve been making all sorts of sizes of HD milk crates for decades that stand up to pretty much all the reqs you propose. And they come in many pretty and manly colors.

-- I meant to do that!

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 550 days


#2 posted 07-23-2015 02:07 AM

duraplate is good stuff too. Its the stuff they use to make the sides of semi trailers. Basically an aluminum and wood sandwich.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View jn111's profile

jn111

3 posts in 1030 days


#3 posted 07-23-2015 02:23 AM

Yeah, I’ve been using milk crates with various inserts for years in all sorts of pretty colors, but I have some different ideas I’d like to try out that milk crates just don’t work for.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4218 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 07-23-2015 04:37 AM

Can’t recommend a material, but something that works great and is cheap. Snag a recycle bin… they are great for toting stuff around in. The ones with a removable, flip top lid are even better.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 548 days


#5 posted 07-23-2015 04:56 AM

Ipe

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

760 posts in 1861 days


#6 posted 07-23-2015 02:06 PM

If you are looking for a wood product try Osage Orange. Fence posts that last years are made of this material.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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RogerM

760 posts in 1861 days


#7 posted 07-23-2015 02:07 PM

If you are looking for a wood product try Osage Orange. Fence posts that last years are made of this material.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1749 posts in 601 days


#8 posted 07-23-2015 03:00 PM



Ipe

- ForestGrl

^^That’s my first recommendation. For a bit more affordability, composite decking boards may work but I’ve never used them so take it with a grain of salt!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#9 posted 07-23-2015 05:31 PM

Serious answer. I use one for exactly what you describe and have left them out in the elements for years at a time. They are lightweight, waterproof, and very tough. Rubbermaid containers.

If you really, really, want to use wood, choose white pine and paint it. Your construction method will be more important than the wood you use, you’re only talking 20-30 lbs. Sorry folks but ipe and osage orange are ridiculous suggestions for the purpose.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5723 posts in 2830 days


#10 posted 07-24-2015 05:24 AM

The only thing wrong with plastic is that the sun eats it up unless it’s one of those designed to be outdoors like the ones from Suncast or similar from Rubbermaid.

Many plastics just can’t handle the UV, unless you live where “the sun don’t shine” that much …. if there is such a place.

This is a link to UV resistant plastics

In my opinion, wood is still the best for continual outdoor exposure!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View watermark's profile

watermark

482 posts in 1405 days


#11 posted 07-24-2015 06:38 AM

Marine grade plywood coated with truck bed liner might do the trick. If you have any doubts just wrap it in duct tape ; )

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#12 posted 07-24-2015 12:07 PM

Trex.
+1 for composite decking.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#13 posted 07-24-2015 12:49 PM

I agree with marine plywood. Probably just as cheap to buy Rubbermaid Actionpacker totes.

View jn111's profile

jn111

3 posts in 1030 days


#14 posted 07-24-2015 01:28 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions so far! I’ve been doing some more searching around on my own and stumbled across stabilized wood with cactus juice resin. Anyone ever use it on larger pieces? I saw a good video of some guys building a mallet out a piece, so it looks to stand up to a beating and seems to be at least very water resistant. Just wondering if I could use it on pieces larger than pen blanks.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#15 posted 07-24-2015 04:41 PM


The only thing wrong with plastic is that the sun eats it up unless it s one of those designed to be outdoors like the ones from Suncast or similar from Rubbermaid.
- oldnovice

Like I said, I left one of those plastic containers in my southern facing driveway for several years and it held up just fine, bone dry inside and hurricanes and tropical storms are not uncommon here. And I’m still using that same container although it’s now in my garden shed. Ultimately though, the sun will destroy everything, even wood.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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