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critique this stand, will it gold 3000 pounds?

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Forum topic by marvelouzone posted 07-22-2015 10:17 PM 6092 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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marvelouzone

7 posts in 1244 days


07-22-2015 10:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood stand aquarium stand

SO I’m building a stand for a custom aquarium which measure 96”L, 24”H, 30”D. it’s 300 gallons which is around 2400lbs, plus 200lbs aquarium weight, will probably have about 300lbs of sand, and misc. stuff.. SO the Drawing is using lumber I already have.. Someone wlse recommended I use 2×6 Stringers on top front and back, but I’m trying to leave as much space inside stand as it will be where filters and sump is, which will be about 48Lx23h,12D.. I’d like to be able to remove sump if necessary to maintenance it.. Here’s a picture of my idea.. It will be wrapped in 1/4” oak, stained and poly’ed, plan on building doors for stand as well.. the 4 corner post are 4×4 with notches cut for 2×4’s to rest on, other 4 post in center are 2×4..


20 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1413 days


#1 posted 07-22-2015 10:38 PM

Geez, that is a lot of weight, and you really do not want the center section to sag. I think sagging in the middle is a real issue here. I would suggest beefing up the verticals in the central upright supports to carry the weight. If it were me, I would also make the entire upper frame out of four by fours. That may well all be over kill for the job at hand, and a real engineer can probably tell us so, using parameters set for great lumber. Most lumber we get these days is not so great. My guess is that your investment in the aquarium, peripherals, fish, etc. is an order of magnitude greater than the cost of beefy lumber to make a really sturdy base. I would go heavier, rather than try for the minimal acceptable size, but that is just my opinion. Do you want to remove the fish, drain the tank, scoop out the sand and whatever, then remove the tank to later add some heft to the frame?

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2658 posts in 2645 days


#2 posted 07-22-2015 10:50 PM

I wouldn’t count on it, looks subject to racking and sagging. You might want to look up existing plans for aquarium stands.

-- Allen, Colorado

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

693 posts in 685 days


#3 posted 07-22-2015 10:56 PM

I used to be into aquariums before. Was my main hobby and you can google DIY aquarium stands and you will see lots of examples.

What you have is pretty standard except a lot of people would double up on the 2×4s on the top frame but the 4×4s in the corners will hold the weight.
Some also would put the 4×4s in the 2 center supports as well and probably wouldn’t be a bad idea to do for this either.

If i was making one from scratch, I probably would have more than 2 columns in the middle but I do understand you need to have room for a sump and filters as well.

View natenaaron's profile

natenaaron

408 posts in 1258 days


#4 posted 07-22-2015 11:01 PM

This is just my opinion. I don’t see nearly enough support there. I am with Kazooman Over build that puppy.

The weight you want to support is not something I would trust to lumber unless I knew exactly what I was doing. I would go steel and face with wood. Do it right and no one will see the steel. Go industrial and mix the steel and wood. You don’t want that much weight coming down on someone..

Have you checked to see if where you are putting it can stand that much weight in such a small area? The stand will be very heavy if you do it right no matter what you build it out of.

View Stewbot's profile

Stewbot

195 posts in 545 days


#5 posted 07-23-2015 01:35 AM

I have built a couple of these, the biggest being for a 100-120 gallon tank, I can’t remember but significantly smaller than yours. I had less need for space underneath and was most concerned about its strength, being that it was going to sit in somebody else’s living room. I basically needed to be sure and didn’t want to try and get tricky with the design. Although a much more clunky approach, I framed it as I would walls for a house, except with 2×3. For the access into the cabinet, I simply did a jack and king stud with a 4×4 header. The material used horizontally across the studs prevented racking. Based on yours plans and a need for space underneath I can see that you are looking for a more clever approach, but just thought I would share.

-- Hoopty scoop?

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#6 posted 07-23-2015 01:42 AM

A 2×4 can only hold around 370 lbs per 6 feet. You need bigger lumber and more of it.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View marvelouzone's profile

marvelouzone

7 posts in 1244 days


#7 posted 07-23-2015 01:55 AM


A 2×4 can only hold around 370 lbs per 6 feet. You need bigger lumber and more of it.

- Luthierman


that is true, but there is no 6ft span unsupported, the longest length unsupported is 28.5 and its on edge, that 370 is when perpendicular to grain right? was hoping someone would have calculations.. might have to dig some up

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Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#8 posted 07-23-2015 02:01 AM

The 370 is on edge too. Or you could say the 3.5 going vertical. I understand that you have quite a bit less than 6 ft unsupported, I just know that weight ratings are not meant to be exceeded or even met. I would make sure your structure can hold 6000 lbs, not just the minimum.

Check out this site. http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View marvelouzone's profile

marvelouzone

7 posts in 1244 days


#9 posted 07-23-2015 02:04 AM



The 370 is on edge too. Or you could say the 3.5 going vertical. I understand that you have quite a bit less than 6 ft unsupported, I just know that weight ratings are not meant to be exceeded or even met. I would make sure your structure can hold 6000 lbs, not just the minimum.

Check out this site. http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

- Luthierman

that is the plan I’m going for a safety factor of 2.5 to 3.. I will do some more calculating, I’m getting conflicting information from some engineers on another forum…

View marvelouzone's profile

marvelouzone

7 posts in 1244 days


#10 posted 07-23-2015 02:20 AM


The 370 is on edge too. Or you could say the 3.5 going vertical. I understand that you have quite a bit less than 6 ft unsupported, I just know that weight ratings are not meant to be exceeded or even met. I would make sure your structure can hold 6000 lbs, not just the minimum.

Check out this site. http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

- Luthierman

if you plug those same numbers in you just gave me
72” span at 1.5 front to back 3.5 depth it says that a single 2×4 can handle total 800lbs with only .02 sag which is acceptable by there calculator.. if you plug in 29 in as length(longest length unsupported 28.5”) it says it would take 5000lbs with .02 sag… in theory 8 sections that could take 5000lbs… now a single 4×4 post is supposed to be able to take 7800 lbs.. we have 4 of those and 4 2×4 post, the 4×4 post are notched so they contact the ground as well. It seems I am already at a safety factor of 3.. I’m also considering that the weight is evenly distributed throughout the whole stand and not just one point..

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#11 posted 07-23-2015 02:29 AM

Yes, but remember that would be clear lumber with straight grain. I don’t know how to factor in knots. I’m not saying no to your design. I am saying I really like to make sure it can do what it is supposed to do. Don’t forget to bolster you floors while you are at it. It would really suck to have a floor joist give out due to the weight.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3666 posts in 1181 days


#12 posted 07-23-2015 02:31 AM

One thing to consider is the bottom of the aquarium, what is it made from and how thick? What will be the support requirements to keep it from falling out of the bottom of the tank? It could be 1/8” non-tempered plate glass or 1 1/2” Lexan needing only a perimeter support. As for the unsupported span, the front and rear panes of the tank will be in vertical shear both offering substantial beam strength. The vertical members of the tank stand alone would be able to support the weight absent of the horizontal members (in theory if you could get them to not fall over). As for racking, it might be a better idea to use a heavier (1/2”) construction grade plywood glued and screwed to the back and sides before wrapping in 1/4” oak.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 885 days


#13 posted 07-23-2015 03:00 PM

I think a torsion box is a far better design to start with.

Glass does not flex. Any sagging will cause a failure.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View sras's profile

sras

4391 posts in 2590 days


#14 posted 07-23-2015 03:14 PM

One thing to keep in mind is lateral forces – think of someone losing their balance running into an end. You’l want to consider a way to make your joints strong enough.

Also – being only 12” deep you’ll want to consider anchoring the stand to the wall.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23127 posts in 2327 days


#15 posted 07-23-2015 03:31 PM

Are you building this for yourself or someone else?

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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