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What is next to learn for casework? Belt sander / OSS needed?

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Forum topic by Holbs posted 07-22-2015 01:11 AM 847 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

1379 posts in 1496 days


07-22-2015 01:11 AM

1.) So here is my feeble yet enriching experiment into my first true cabinet using casework joinery. All joints were done via tongue & groove, no screws, all glue & clamp. I really like tongue & groove joinery as it reminds me of Lego’s… and 2 table saw setups can cut all tongue & grooves from start to finish. I have done some simpler fully housed dado’s on other projects. What should I work on next? I have to do a nearly identical cabinet for my Grizzly combo sander & sanding tools. I currently want to stay away from pocket screw joinery for time being. I strongly believe to start with a challenge. Face frames & Rails/Stile door joinery? I’m getting the casework lingo down thanks to 5 cabinet books I purchased from amazon:
The Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture & Cabinet Construction by Andy Rae
Cabinets And Built-Ins by Paul Levine
Illustrated Cabinetmaking by Bill Hylton
The Joint Book by Terrie Noll
The Complete Woodworker’s Companion by Roger Holmes

———————————————

2.) One hand tool I have not acquired yet is a belt sander. I have 3 hand sanders (ros bosch’s). Are the belt sanders welcomed and admired in your wood shop? If so, for what purposes ?

3.) As I have no belt sander, I have no OSS either. My old delta oscillating sanding attachment kit to my 10” drill press works but … I know it’s not ideal. I see little grizzly OSS and shopmaster’s here and there. Worth having in your shop ?

-eric

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"


8 replies so far

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bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1818 days


#1 posted 07-22-2015 04:02 AM

I have a belt sander but never use it. OSS are useful but I got away with a drum sander on a drill press for many years before I bought an OSS. I really wouldn’t call those “tongue and groove” joints but rather rabbet and dado joints. Tongue and groove is for aligning solid wood boards into panels and is generally not used on on plywood.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 07-22-2015 10:36 AM

As for the belt sander, if there was one tool I would tell anyone to avoid, no matter what you’re level of experience.
It has rightly deserved nickname “project destroyer”.

Nice project. I think you’ll find a full dado is a stronger than the rabbets you’ve got there.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

809 posts in 2316 days


#3 posted 07-22-2015 11:56 AM

It looks like you’ve got a stationary belt and disc sander back behind the DP, so I think you’re asking about a handheld belt sander. The belt sander removes a ton a stock very quickly and has little to no use in finish sanding. It can have it’s uses though for tasks like rounding corners on larger projects you can’t take to the stationary belt. I have a couple of butcher block tables which when heavily scored get a full belt sanding treatment, but otherwise the belt does not get much use. For an OSS, do you have a Bandsaw? Unless you’re frequently cutting curves and shapes then the OSS won’t get much use, but when you do need it it is very nice to have, but for infrequent use the drum on DP works fine, just not as quickly.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2881 posts in 2994 days


#4 posted 07-22-2015 12:18 PM

If you are just getting started building casework as a hobbyist, I would encourage you to avoid sanding as much as possible. Milling and jointing accurately and the light use of hand planes, files and scrapers is my approach.

I am not anti-sanding, but I do all of mine by hand with a sanding block. It is a lot of work, which encourages me to get the earlier surface preparation and jointing right.

Just a suggestion.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 07-23-2015 12:14 AM

I can ruin a project quicker with a hand held belt sander than any tool in my shop! I do use my OSS a lot, particularly for sanding to a line on bandsawn parts. My OSS is the older model Harbor Freight and it has been a good tool. (But you will find a REALLY nice OSS for pennies and rehab it!)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#6 posted 07-23-2015 12:14 AM

I can ruin a project quicker with a hand held belt sander than any tool in my shop! I do use my OSS a lot, particularly for sanding to a line on bandsawn parts. My OSS is the older model Harbor Freight and it has been a good tool. (But you will find a REALLY nice OSS for pennies and rehab it!)

As far as new joinery to work on, I am a big fan of half lap joints for their strength and self squaring nature.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1492 days


#7 posted 07-23-2015 05:58 AM

I have a small belt sander that can be used with one hand (steadier with 2 hands, of course). I frequently find used for it. Don’t get near plywood with one, though (except for edges). You can sand through the face veneers before you know it.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View johnstoneb's profile (online now)

johnstoneb

2148 posts in 1640 days


#8 posted 07-23-2015 01:07 PM

+1 ChuckV and gfadvm I don’t have a handheld belt sander but have used one before. They will take off a lot of material in a hurry. I try to keep my sanding to a minimum surface prep and accurate joint setup and cutting. I use an ROS for sanding then a sanding block for the touchup before finishing. I do have an OSS generally use it for sanding to a line on curved surfaces and stacking pieces to get them all the same shape.
Don’t knock a type of joinery (ie pocket screws) They all have their strong points and week points. I thinkRabbett and dado or tongue and groove are a good joint for cabinets. for doors you might try a half lap or a half lap miter combination. Dovetail or finger joints are good on drawers and add a decorative touch that other joints don’t.
Your cabinet is looking good. in every project try to use some technique or joint you haven’t used before.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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