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Forum topic by Combo Prof posted 07-21-2015 04:53 PM 715 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Combo Prof

2373 posts in 738 days


07-21-2015 04:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question brass marking gauge part

This is the brass plate of my Stanley 65 marking gauge. I need the same part to restore a vintage Stanley 77 mortise marking gauge. Its about 1/4” by 1/16” by 1-1/4” with raised ends.. I am not a metal worker. How do I make it or where can I buy one?


-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)


16 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#1 posted 07-21-2015 05:01 PM

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1964 days


#2 posted 07-21-2015 05:02 PM

In focus would help.

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

645 posts in 1838 days


#3 posted 07-21-2015 05:06 PM

Get some brass bar/plate and get the files out.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

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Combo Prof

2373 posts in 738 days


#4 posted 07-21-2015 05:25 PM


In focus would help.

- DKV

I tried a couple of times best I could do.


Get some brass bar/plate and get the files out.

- hhhopks

That was my thought but could not find thick enough in town.


http://www.amazon.com/Brass-Sheet-010-FS-10-1/dp/B0006MZOB2

- mrjinx007

Not thick enough. Unless I fold up the ends some how. Needs to be I think 1/8” by 3/8” by 10/8”

Original looks cast to me.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1938 posts in 1449 days


#5 posted 07-21-2015 05:53 PM

I would bend the ends over making them longer than needed to make the bend easier. Then use a file and or Dremel tool to shape it. Brass is easy to cut and file….it will take some time but is doable.

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Combo Prof

2373 posts in 738 days


#6 posted 07-21-2015 06:09 PM



I would bend the ends over making them longer than needed to make the bend easier. Then use a file and or Dremel tool to shape it. Brass is easy to cut and file….it will take some time but is doable.

- Redoak49

O.K. I’ll try that. I’m assuming any kind of file will work. I have some have some HF diamond files as well as the usual bastard files. Do I score the brass be for bending?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2532 posts in 1435 days


#7 posted 07-21-2015 07:43 PM

Don’t need to score it. If you need some 1/8 thick brass, I have some I can send. PM me with your address.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Combo Prof

2373 posts in 738 days


#8 posted 07-21-2015 11:11 PM


Don t need to score it. If you need some 1/8 thick brass, I have some I can send. PM me with your address.

- Hammerthumb

I may do that it would come out more true if I carved out the piece from thick stock. But I got some thiner stock now and will try the bending. One though about the scoring is that if I score and heat I can get a more square bend. But first I’ll try it with out such treatment and see. As usual I don’t really know what I am doing until I jump in and get my feet wet. But to avoid at least some mistakes I ask lots of questions first.

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1534 days


#9 posted 07-22-2015 12:20 AM

depending on the brass stock it wont t take a sharp bend make a hollow in a piece of wood and cast the lump from brazing rod and then get out the fiies.

View Combo Prof's profile

Combo Prof

2373 posts in 738 days


#10 posted 07-22-2015 12:39 AM



depending on the brass stock it wont t take a sharp bend make a hollow in a piece of wood and cast the lump from brazing rod and then get out the fiies.

- REO

Sorry to ask but how do I cast the brass. I.e. How do I melt it? What do do I need to do this?

-- Don K, (Houghton, Michigan)

View KevinL's profile

KevinL

29 posts in 811 days


#11 posted 07-22-2015 12:42 AM

Anneal the brass first by heating it up with a torch and quench it in water. Brass is going to work harden very fast when you bend it. Chances are it’s hard from the rolling process in the manufacturing process. You may have to do it again as you work with it.

Then break out the files and it won’t take very log at all.

-- KevinL

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KevinL

29 posts in 811 days


#12 posted 07-22-2015 12:47 AM

Also before you start using the files, run a piece of chalk over the file and fill all of the teeth with the chalk. It will help keep the file from pining (material caught in file teeth).

Have a file card to clean the file up, re apply the chalk, and keep filing.

After you are done with the file, you can polish it all up by using several grits of emery paper.

-- KevinL

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2532 posts in 1435 days


#13 posted 07-22-2015 12:48 AM

Don- I’ll send enough so you can experiment with a few techniques. Agree with the annealing process above.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#14 posted 07-22-2015 12:58 AM

Go to a place that makes trophies and plaques and buy the brass there. Or just buy a new marking gauge – probably much easier.

View upchuck's profile

upchuck

540 posts in 1125 days


#15 posted 07-22-2015 02:42 AM

Combo Prof-
You could cast it… but that is a whole nother ball of wax. What are you going to use for the mold? Wood? I wonder if the temperature of the melted brass would exceed the temperature of wood combustion. I suspect so. Also what do you have to to heat the brass to melting point? And to hold liquid brass for pouring? I also suspect that the filing/grinding of your raw casting would equal or exceed the same if you reduce a piece of brass stock. I’ve recently begun to work on some raw bronze castings and while a different material it is labor intensive.
Good luck and that nice mortise gauge is worth preserving.
chuck

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