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Need advise on starting on nightstand

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 07-21-2015 01:49 AM 664 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

294 posts in 848 days


07-21-2015 01:49 AM

I came up with a design below for a night stand based on Darrell Peart’s Greene and Greene nightstand.
I simplified it by omitting some of the details and it will be painted white (probably milk paint) with the top being stained wood (maybe walnut). So I have the following questions before I start:

1. What kind of wood? I am thinking soft maple because it is good for painting, hard enough but still easy to work with. Cost is also lower than most hardwoods.

2. How to make the legs? There is a straight tapered portion with some curves on the top. they are 1.5 inches thick.
I could just get it close using the bandsaw and use a hand plane to smooth the straight portion and a drum sander on the drill press to smooth the curves. Another idea would be use a router with a template for the curved part but the 1.5 thickness makes that more difficult. Yet another idea is to make the straight taper all one piece and cut it on a table saw and then add the curved part as a separate piece, it might save some wood but maybe more trouble than its worth and it might look funny where the two pieces join.

Maybe I need one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/Shop-Fox-W1831-Oscillating-Spindle/dp/B008DPYSHA/ref=lp_552892_1_2?s=power-hand-tools&ie=UTF8&qid=1437444669&sr=1-2

Maybe Darrell will see this and give me some hints.

Thanks

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


9 replies so far

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#1 posted 07-21-2015 03:59 AM

That spindle sander looks identical to my Harbor Freight model. I bought it for $89 with their 20% discount on top of the sale price a year or so ago. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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DKV

3940 posts in 1970 days


#2 posted 07-21-2015 04:26 AM

MT, looks can be deceiving. Maybe the Shopfox has more ups and downs per minute or more windings or thicker paint or more…

-- This is a Troll Free zone.

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#3 posted 07-21-2015 05:29 AM

That shallow inside curve calls out for a compass plane. They have an adjustable sole, and can be configured for convex or concave curves. A really neat tool. I got mine off Ebay. Of course, that would be after roughing it out on the bands

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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knotscott

7223 posts in 2842 days


#4 posted 07-21-2015 09:37 AM

You might find that poplar is even less expensive than maple…paints well.

I’d consider making the legs as two pieces….the tapered section with straight lines, and treat the curved piece like a corbel, then glue it on after.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#5 posted 07-21-2015 10:38 AM

Use an applied piece for the curved section of the leg.
This is how a transition piece is put on a lot of furniture so its an accepted technique.
In your case, you don’t even have to worry about matching grain cause your painting it.
I agree with knotscott. Poplar seems to be the logical, economical choice here.
You don’t want to paint over nice wood, right?

The top is going to contrast with the painted base, so I would just decide between a dark or light colored wood.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Joel_B

294 posts in 848 days


#6 posted 07-21-2015 05:17 PM

Thanks for the suggestions, sounds like making it in two pieces is the way to go.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#7 posted 07-21-2015 06:34 PM

The easiest way to make the legs is to cut and fair a pattern. Then attach the template to the leg stock with carpet tape, and shape it on a router table. This way when you decide to make another nightstand, much of the work will be done for you.
If you are shopping for an OSS, I recommend the Ridgid because it has an oscillating belt. I use the belt 99% of the time. I think you will find it useful for finish sanding. If you don’t have a router table, you could use the sander to fair the legs. It is a lot more work, but it will do the job.

By the way, I would make the legs from a single piece of stock.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Joel_B

294 posts in 848 days


#8 posted 07-21-2015 08:28 PM


The easiest way to make the legs is to cut and fair a pattern. Then attach the template to the leg stock with carpet tape, and shape it on a router table. This way when you decide to make another nightstand, much of the work will be done for you.
If you are shopping for an OSS, I recommend the Ridgid because it has an oscillating belt. I use the belt 99% of the time. I think you will find it useful for finish sanding. If you don t have a router table, you could use the sander to fair the legs. It is a lot more work, but it will do the job.

By the way, I would make the legs from a single piece of stock.

- pintodeluxe

Is this what you mean?

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/video/essential-router-table-jigs-pattern-routing.aspx

Thanks for the tip on the Rigid OSS, looks like it is worth the extra bit of money.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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Joel_B

294 posts in 848 days


#9 posted 07-21-2015 08:38 PM

I can’t get soft maple thicker than 3/4 so it looks like I will be using poplar at least for the legs.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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