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Outdoor finish for white oak Adirondack chairs?

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Forum topic by ColonelTravis posted 07-20-2015 10:43 PM 748 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ColonelTravis

1194 posts in 1361 days


07-20-2015 10:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: spar varnish adirondack

Working on Adirondack chairs, I want something more substantial than the cedar we’ve got now. After a few years cedar gets too wobbly. Going with white oak – obviously stronger but I’m not sure I want to paint it because we have painted chairs now and would like something different. I’d like to stain the oak a reddish brown and put on a UV protected top coat. Do they make spar varnish that isn’t glossy? It looks great on boats but I don’t want that high gloss boat look for chairs and a table.


12 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3555 posts in 1235 days


#1 posted 07-20-2015 11:36 PM

There is an outdoor poly at Ace about $47/gallon. I have a can but have not used it yet.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#2 posted 07-20-2015 11:55 PM

I have not used it myself but have heard that clear penetrating epoxy sealer is an excellent finish for waterproofing outdoor furniture made with white oak.maybe you can order it in satin?
http://www.amazon.com/TotalBoat-Penetrating-Epoxy/dp/B00J36WRRG

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#3 posted 07-20-2015 11:59 PM

Spar Urethane comes in gloss, semi gloss, and satin BUT do not believe the claims for UV protection. It WILL crack and peel with exposure to sun for a few months. Then it will require sanding back to bare wood to refinish. BLO will not crack and peel like a clear coat and is easier to redo by just wiping more on/off.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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ColonelTravis

1194 posts in 1361 days


#4 posted 07-21-2015 02:15 AM

gfadvm – interesting, I’d never thought of BLO for outdoor stuff.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#5 posted 07-21-2015 02:43 AM

People have been using it for trailer floors as long as I can remember.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View BurtC's profile

BurtC

101 posts in 2597 days


#6 posted 07-21-2015 03:49 AM

I just finished some cedar with Epifanes varnish. Great stuff, highly recommend.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005ADWKTG?refRID=1CTAV8PW6GCPGJ9H9TG2&ref_=pd_bia_yo_t_8

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1194 posts in 1361 days


#7 posted 07-21-2015 05:37 AM

Burt that’s what I was looking at and many people recommend, how glossy is it?

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#8 posted 07-21-2015 11:42 AM

Look at 100% pure tung oil. This link has some info.

http://www.realmilkpaint.com/products/oils/tung-oil-wood-finishes/

I suspect that an oil will be easier to maintain.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2157 days


#9 posted 07-21-2015 01:49 PM

The Wood Whisperer had a video on Epiphanes he used on a front door in Arizona. It is pretty pricey (unless its lasts for many years).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2802 days


#10 posted 07-21-2015 03:14 PM

I am convinced that a good quality marine varnish is the best. It has UV protection and is formulated to take expansion and contraction without cracking or becoming brittle. Outdoor finishes are always less effective in warm dry climates as the sun is the most destructive of the elements.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

197 posts in 2832 days


#11 posted 07-21-2015 05:44 PM

An oil like BLO or Tung Oil won’t split and crack as the moisture content varies. A fresh coat can be added easily every year without much surface prep, and it stays flexible and doesn’t crack or peel with moisture changes in the wood. It was a commonly used finish for contractor’s wooden ladders years ago. White oak with a BLO top coating should be very weatherproof and easily maintained with some re-finishing every year or two.

Charley

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2110 days


#12 posted 07-21-2015 06:13 PM

The only problem with BLO is that it seems to pick up ambient dirt on the surface which becomes imbedded in the BLO over time. You must scrub prior to recoating.

If you decide to use BLO, thin the BLO down with Turps to about 3 parts turps to 1 part BLO so it really penetrates the wood and don’t forget to hit the end grain on the legs. Apply a few coats until it doesn’t absorb any more and wipe of the remaining. Make sure you let the rag you use dry out before you throw it away, spontaneous combustible..

-- Respectfully, Paul

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