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Forum topic by studie posted 10-14-2009 11:24 AM 9928 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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studie

618 posts in 2613 days


10-14-2009 11:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: milling

Consider what IPE is about and the relative low cost, many are reluctant to work with it. It’s not much different than other hardwoods from the cutting & fabrication standpoint. I have worked with IPE for many years, Decks, furniture, gauges & various other applications that have been artful as well as extremely durable. Think about this; it has the same fire rating as steel and or concrete, insects will not bother with it, will last for 40 years outside without any finish(although much more beautiful with finish) I find it to be gratifying as a medium to work with. Why use cheap stuff when your craftsmanship takes the same amount of time anyway?

-- $tudie


24 replies so far

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patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#1 posted 10-14-2009 11:55 AM

good to know , thanks .

the only wood source in new mexico ,
that caries exotics ,
doesn’t sell them anymore ?

now it’s just ’ cardboards ’ ( domestics ) !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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JJohnston

1614 posts in 2757 days


#2 posted 10-14-2009 04:03 PM

David, you mean there actually is such a source in New Mexico? What is it?

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

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EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#3 posted 10-14-2009 05:40 PM

What effects does logging it have on the environment and the indigenous population? Are the loggers murdering them? Are the little suckers down there fighting world war III for our right to breath? These questions are not rhetorical, I really do not know.

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#4 posted 10-14-2009 05:50 PM

jjohnston ,
used to be called kitts
then paxtons
then genweld
then orepack
now who knows?
on edith south of osuna on the right
past the patio paver place .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#5 posted 10-14-2009 05:58 PM

updated 2:27 p.m. ET, Sat., Jan. 10, 2009

WILDWOOD, N.J. – New Jersey’s most popular beach town is about to make a decision that has been criticized by environmentalists around the world — using wood cut from Amazon rainforests to repair a section of its boardwalk.

Wildwood, voted the state’s best beach last summer by vacationers and others, will become just the latest of several New Jersey communities that have opted to use highly durable wood from the Brazilian ipe tree to build or fix boardwalks.

The wood looks good, lasts for decades, is strong, and can withstand moisture and the corrosive effects of salt better than other species of wood, making it popular for use in boardwalks.

Environmental groups contend the world’s tropical rainforests are being wiped out by logging to satisfy demand for this kind of wood.

Mayor Ernest Troiano Jr. said Wildwood reluctantly turned to ipe wood only because a shipment of domestically grown black locust wood arrived in unusable condition.

“I’m not advocating tearing down the Brazilian rainforests,” he said. “We wanted to use black locust, to do the right thing and the environmentally responsible thing. But the wood we ordered is not the wood that was delivered.”

Unless a last-minute alternative can be found, Wildwood will start using ipe wood within the next few weeks to replace aging planks in front of the skee-ball arcades, body-piercing stands and fortune teller booths that line its boardwalk.

“We have the boardwalk torn open and it needs to be fixed and ready to go by Easter,” Troiano said. “If we don’t get that hole closed up, it will be a nightmare for our merchants.”

Brazilian ipe vs. black locust
The move comes a year after Ocean City, a fellow Cape May County beach town, was criticized by environmentalists for using Brazilian ipe to replace part of its boardwalk. Thousands of protest e-mails from as far away as Australia, the Philippines, South Africa and New Zealand flooded the mayor’s computer.

Ipe is a flowering tree that can grow to 100 feet, towering above the forest canopy. It is Brazil’s largest timber export, with half of it sold to customers in the United States.

Ipe wood has been used in boardwalk projects from coast to coast, including Atlantic City, N.J.; New York; Baltimore; Chicago; Miami Beach, and Long Beach and Santa Monica, Calif.

Environmentalists have been trying for years to promote the use of abundant, domestically grown species like black locust as an alternative to rainforest wood. And Wildwood agreed to use black locust for its boardwalk project — a decision that was hailed by Tim Keating, executive director of Rainforest Relief, a New York volunteer group that opposes the use of rainforest wood.

However, a shipment of black locust from a New York supplier arrived in poor condition with pieces of bark, large knots and cracks.

“I equate it to our having paid for a new Cadillac, and having a beat-up 1972 Ford Pinto show up in the driveway,” Troiano said. He estimated 90 percent of the wood was unusable.

‘A traditionalist thing’
The locust wood cost about $100,000, part of a $3.5 million boardwalk repair project. Ocean City, about 20 miles up the coast, spent $1.1 million for Brazilian ipe for its boardwalk; that wood was supposed to be certified as having been harvested responsibly from trusted sources in the Amazon, making it more expensive.

Keating said he is worried that the poor condition of the black locust shipped to Wildwood will give the species a bad reputation among shore towns and discourage its use in other projects. He said he is trying to identify other suppliers of black locust that could be used for the rest of Wildwood’s boardwalk project, even if the current three-block section is rebuilt with ipe wood.

Environmental groups have suggested Wildwood consider using planks made from recycled plastic, which is slowly catching on in boardwalks around the nation. At the Jersey shore, the towns of Belmar and Spring Lake are using it.

But Troiano said the current project has to be done with the same general type of material as ipe or black locust. He also raised aesthetic questions about plastic lumber.

“When people go to a boardwalk, they want to walk on a boardwalk; they don’t want a plastic walk,” Troiano said. “It’s a traditionalist thing. They want wood under their feet.”

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#6 posted 10-14-2009 06:00 PM

The hezz with the little indigenous boadstards, I don’t want to walk on no stinking plastic.

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#7 posted 10-14-2009 06:01 PM

It’s grown to be harvested so it’s a sustainable product. I’ve used Ipe for years its great,tough and even fire rated for use around fireplace surrounds,also use for floors,decks and exterior furniture. It’s so dense it sinks when put in water.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#8 posted 10-14-2009 06:09 PM

Jim, do you have a link to that?
I do want to use the stuff.

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#9 posted 10-14-2009 06:11 PM

I don’t want to blindly go where everyone has gone before.

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#10 posted 10-14-2009 06:14 PM

Hey EZ
I buy mine as decking material from my local lumber store. But I do have a link.
http://www.ipedepot.com/picelist01.htm?gclid=CO3Jqof3vJ0CFZla2godlmZovQ
BTW this stuff is super heavy so your better off buying it local instead of having it shipped.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1510 posts in 3591 days


#11 posted 10-14-2009 06:24 PM

Also, wear a respirator when you mill it. I made a threshold out of a piece I got from the surplus pile at my local high end deck place, and in putting the rounds on the edges with the router table generated clouds of the most noxious smelling green dust ever.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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Moron

5032 posts in 3359 days


#12 posted 10-14-2009 06:32 PM

Not all of it comes from sustained forestry practices or tree farms so if your “soul” is saying “I’m killing a rain forest”....you can always make sure it comes from Sustainable forest practices and or tree farming.

Its heavy, hard like concrete and will take the edge of your tools off, far faster then “normal” North American hardwoods. Ipe can also cause skin irritations and respiratory problems from the dust…...very nasty dust.

That said…..........it makes for fantastic outdoor furniture, decking, outdoor structures like gazebos and pergolas. Too darn heavy for this boy when used for indoor furniture.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#13 posted 10-14-2009 06:34 PM

I don’t mean to discount Dan’s input but I have not experienced “clouds of green dust” I imagine if in tight quarters any wood can make a dust cloud. But I do agree with wearing a respirator when cutting a great amount of Ipe.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View EzJack's profile

EzJack

451 posts in 2637 days


#14 posted 10-14-2009 06:41 PM

Jim, no, I meant a link on how it’s “grown to be harvested so it’s a sustainable product.”

-- Ain't better or worse than any other woodpecker in the woods.

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#15 posted 10-14-2009 06:47 PM

How about this one Jack

http://www.ipe-wood.com/faq.html

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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