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Skil Saw 825 blade guard spring

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Forum topic by wflather posted 07-16-2015 03:13 PM 1252 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


07-16-2015 03:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: skil skilsaw model 825 blade guard spring

I have and old Skil model 825 saw, it must be 50-60 years old, from the generation with the oval blue/white name/model/SN plate.
Runs great, but the blade guard spring needs to be replaced or tightened.
I have totally failed to find any information on dis-assembly so that I can access the coil spring that returns the blade guard over the blade.
I have removed the outer part of the blade guard, and removed the three screws behind the inner blade-guard accessed by the two holes near the center of the guard, but am at a total loss as to what to do next.
If anyone here is familiar with how to get at this, I would really appreciate it if you would post any useful information you have.
Thanks


18 replies so far

View BreeStephany's profile

BreeStephany

50 posts in 1653 days


#1 posted 07-26-2015 02:11 PM

The tolerances of the bearing for that holds the blade guard are pretty tight. This combined with the fact that there is really no great seal on the top of the bearing means that dust, dirt and general grime are GREAT at working their way between the bearing and the housing of the saw body, making removal VERY difficult.

First try PB Blaster, which is ESPECIALLY great if there is rust present on the bearing (generally happens if it was stored for long periods with no gear case oil to prevent rust or stored on its side instead of on the shoe)

If this fails, it might require some gentle persuasion with a flatbar, a piece of 2×3/4” oak and a good heavy rubber mallet. BE VERY CAREFUL WITH THIS and be sure to watch the area right where the steel shaft sleeve meets the guard, as there are generally stress fractures already present in the aluminum guard and this can break the guard.

If all else fails, take a paint pan or other pan that is about 2” deep, fill it with naptha and mineral spirits and place the saw, blade guard down in solution. (Make SURE that the label, motor housing, etc. are not in solution) and let it sit for a few hours to a few days and this will almost certainly free the stuck bearing.

-- Just a girl with way too many tools.

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#2 posted 07-26-2015 11:36 PM

Bree-
After some soaking with liquid wrench and silicone spray, then gentle tapping with pry bar/ball peen on alternate sides, the blade-guard lifted out. I could only have done this with your added information, thanks!

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#3 posted 07-26-2015 11:39 PM

New question: The spring leg on the bottom of the spring sticks out to the side, the leg on the top of the spring sticks straight up. Is this normal? I will need to clean out the parts to see if I can locate holes that these legs insert into, correct?

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BreeStephany

50 posts in 1653 days


#4 posted 07-26-2015 11:55 PM

I can’t recall the exact position of the spring. I believe that there is a single hole on the guard sleeve and there should be multiple holes on the saw housing.

Use a straight pick and compressed air to clean out the dirt and grime that have likely filled almost all of the holes within the housing.

The spring looks correct, however, I don’t recall the bottom part being bent out and thought it was generally bent straight back, though this may incorrect

Hope that helps

-- Just a girl with way too many tools.

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#5 posted 07-27-2015 02:42 PM

BTW, how can you have too many tools? Is that actually possible?

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BreeStephany

50 posts in 1653 days


#6 posted 07-27-2015 03:02 PM



BTW, how can you have too many tools? Is that actually possible?

For me, my tool collection is exceeding the functional space of my shop… time to build a new shop… but that means reigning in my tool budget significantly… hence having way too many tools…

-- Just a girl with way too many tools.

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BreeStephany

50 posts in 1653 days


#7 posted 07-27-2015 03:05 PM

After looking at my parts again, your spring is correct, just make sure to do a good job of cleaning up all of the spring holes to make for easy installation and winding / tensioning of the guard.

-- Just a girl with way too many tools.

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#8 posted 07-27-2015 08:48 PM

I’ll do that, thanks.
My shop is in a similar state. I’ve tried to put a halt on all projects until I can get it all organized, cabinets, shelves storage compartments that are labeled, tool chests to protect edge tools, work surfaces. Clearing off ALL work spaces until I can actually see the bench tops again.
I’ve got an antique work bench that has been in pieces for several years, I’ll be rebuilding it soon…...

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#9 posted 08-18-2015 09:36 PM

Update:
After assembling and dis-assembling the darn thing 20 times, I finally got the guard spring properly assembled, the guard now swings closed with some authority and I can consider the saw safe to use. I do still need to fill the gear case with oil (which I have never done- shame on me).
i also found a “feature” that I had not counted on: the center section that the spring leg needs to seat into screws into the blade guard with a reverse thread. The spring tension pushes the screw tight into the blade guard, once you get it assembled properly.
I (finally) figured out that the spring leg that pointed up was not seating itself into any of the holes in the center collar, by a fraction of an inch. The holes are just set a bit inside the outside edge of the recess, and the spring leg was pushing tight against the outside. I needed to gently bring that leg towards the center of the spring. Once I had the spring finding, and seating itself into one of the holes, I placed the guard in about 1/8 of a turn more clockwise than its final position, pushed it down into place until the spring seated itself, then rotated the guard into place and seated it completely into the opening. I hate 30 minute jobs that take 3 weeks to figure out.

Bree, thanks for all your help.

View aMileHi's profile

aMileHi

3 posts in 221 days


#10 posted 05-03-2016 08:14 PM

I know this is an old thread, but there really isn’t much info on the 825 out there.
I picked one up few days ago and its one of these older ones too. I just took mine apart completely and i’m in the process of cleaning/ replacing what’s needed. So far it looks like it will need a few gaskets, and a good cleaning. as i’m reassambling the guard this is coming in handy, but here is the question, was there grease in this bearing? or is it getting lubrication from the oil? can’t quite tell if there is a way for the oil to get to it from inside once all is put back together, and there was enough dirt around the area its hard to tell if that was great with dirt or oil and dirt?

Thanks,
Kris

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#11 posted 05-03-2016 10:07 PM

Kris, mine did appear to be greased, I cleaned it up before taking the pictures. I think any bearing grease would do. I found that i could buy a tube of Skil gear case oil at Lowes. It took a while to find it, I guess its’ not something that they sell a lot of. They had one tube.

View BreeStephany's profile

BreeStephany

50 posts in 1653 days


#12 posted 05-10-2016 03:55 AM


here is the question, was there grease in this bearing? or is it getting lubrication from the oil? can t quite tell if there is a way for the oil to get to it from inside once all is put back together, and there was enough dirt around the area its hard to tell if that was great with dirt or oil and dirt?

Thanks,
Kris

The bearing on the blade guard does not need to be greased. It should be thoroughly cleaned when removed to remove any contaminates, however, once it is cleaned, it should be fine. If you find its sticking after cleaning, a shot of spray silicone grease should be sufficient.

Eventually oil will work its way through the seals very slowly and will keep the bearing somewhat lubed. Due to the fact that there isn’t a ton of constant motion on the bearing, it does not require a significant amount of lube.

-- Just a girl with way too many tools.

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#13 posted 05-10-2016 05:50 PM

——I’d go with what Kris said.

View aMileHi's profile

aMileHi

3 posts in 221 days


#14 posted 05-11-2016 09:01 PM

ok here is the update, I spent about 2 hours fighting the spring and the guard. Finally gave up, took the saw apart again (removed the shaft and the bearings from the housing) this gave me access to the spring guard from inside the housing. It still took about 10 min to get the spring in the tiny hole and all aligned. But it was worth it, it is working like a dream. And yes i just did a touch of spray grease in the guard bearing.

The saw is back together, still needs the tags, and need to polish up few small screws etc, but next is the brushes. Where do you guys get them? are they the same as the 77 brushes? any chance for a part number?

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wflather

20 posts in 514 days


#15 posted 05-12-2016 02:14 AM

Just noticed that I referred to Kris when I meant Bree, she is a wealth of knowledge. Sorry.
Looks like you might be able to get replacement brushes from Sears:
http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-part/825type11/0981/0744410/00030305/00002.html
part# 59 on the diagram

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