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Running 220 wire for jointer

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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 07-14-2015 12:48 PM 2069 views 0 times favorited 75 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1041 days


07-14-2015 12:48 PM

Just picked up a used grizzly g0490 with a byrd cutter head, pretty excited to get it up and running. Problem is I don’t have 220v in my garage and going to have to run wires for it. My breaker box is in the garage, was going to put a sub panel next to it and run a couple more outlets while I’m at it. I’ve never dealt with wiring before so my wife’s brother in law will do that, but he’s out out of town and don’t want to bother him about asking what I need to buy. Was wondering what I need for it so I can have it all ready when he gets back. Also, here’s the plug, didn’t think 220 looked like it, and it says 30a 250v on it, so didn’t know what was up about that.


75 replies so far

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

34 posts in 1385 days


#1 posted 07-14-2015 01:00 PM

You will need a receptacle to match your cord cap, #10 Awg = 30 amps. Look at the motor name plate and see how many amps it draws.

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ClayandNancy

511 posts in 2479 days


#2 posted 07-14-2015 01:02 PM

that’s the male end 220 plug. Is that from your machine? Just go to Home Depot or electrical supplier and get the outlet that matches that plug.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1041 days


#3 posted 07-14-2015 01:13 PM

Yea that’s the plug on machine, just thought it was different than 220v
Still have to make room for it, gotta get rid of a bunch of junk first

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1194 days


#4 posted 07-14-2015 01:13 PM

You can find the mate to that plug anywhere that sells electrical. Just tell them you need 30 amp 250 volt female receptacle. Your biggest problem is they won’t have it in stock, so just go to another store. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2103 days


#5 posted 07-14-2015 01:15 PM

Your machine will not draw 30A. That marking on the plug is just the maximum sustained current for the plug itself. You probably will not require #10 wire FOR YOUR MACHINE but in any case do whatever the code requires. The wire must be no smaller than is required for the breaker. A 20A breaker requires at least #12 wire. A 15A breaker requires at least #14 wire. A 30A breaker requires at least #10 wire. Bigger wire has smaller AWG number. ... but I don’t think you have to have a 30A breaker on that outlet.

Most likely your machine draws less than 20A and can use a 20A breaker with #12 wire. But even though #10 is much more expensive than #12, it may be only a small increment (say + $20) over the #12 if the run is short, so may be worth it just in case you want to power something bigger on that circuit in the future.

While I’m an electrical engineer by education, I’m not an electrician, so check with them since they know requirements of the code.

Oh, and we don’t call it 220 anymore since it, well, isn’t 220, but more like 240.

-Paul

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firefighterontheside

13486 posts in 1321 days


#6 posted 07-14-2015 01:18 PM

There’s numerous different plugs for 240. The drier cord type and twist lock are common. They are both made to accommodate the heavier wire associated with 240 to keep them from coming unplugged due to weight. Look on the plug, it will say something like L6-30 and you will need the corresponding receptacle.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2103 days


#7 posted 07-14-2015 01:27 PM

I think this would do you with 12 AWG wire on a 20A breaker.

L6-20r 20A 3-prong twist lock.

But like Bill said, look at the plug to see if it’s L6-20 or L6-30.

According to grizzley web site, your machine only draws 15A.

... and I’m envious! I wanted that jointer!

-Paul

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#8 posted 07-14-2015 01:36 PM

You might also want to figure out what else you might want in the garage down the road. In my garage I have a single 50A 240V outlet for my welder and possibly a plug in hybrid charger down the road. This gives me many options as 50A will run quite a variety of equipment. In my shop I have two 30A outlets, one 20A outlet and one 50A outlet. The main issue as mentioned already is matching the wire to the breaker. Your safe (may or may not be to code) going with a larger wire, based on the length of the run, for the breaker size but you’re never safe, nor to code if you go with too small of a wire. Depending on your future power requirements, you can get 20A 250V rated straight blade receptacles and plugs far less expensive than the twist lock plug your jointer can with installed.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1911 days


#9 posted 07-14-2015 01:41 PM

I wonder why rewiring a 220v motor back to 110v is not an option?

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

614 posts in 1025 days


#10 posted 07-14-2015 01:54 PM

That jointer requires a 240V 20A circuit using a NEMA 6-20 outlet and plug. The motor is not listed as being able to run on 120V. 220V and 110V terminology is long gone from the 1950’s.

View firefighterontheside's profile (online now)

firefighterontheside

13486 posts in 1321 days


#11 posted 07-14-2015 01:54 PM

It’s a 3hp motor. too many amps.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1911 days


#12 posted 07-14-2015 02:33 PM

Aha,makes sense,thanks F, fighter/Y,me.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View brtech's profile

brtech

903 posts in 2387 days


#13 posted 07-14-2015 02:56 PM

Besides the socket, and the wire, you probably need a work box that can hold the socket. Then you need to figure out how he is going to route the wire, and decide if you need some conduit. If all the wire is in the ceiling or behind wall board, then just the romex wire will do, plus the box that holds the socket. If any of the wire is to be exposed (like, for example, coming down from the ceiling to an outlet mounted on the wall, not in the wall, then you need conduit, and the connectors for the conduit. If you are running romex to the box, then you need the wire clamp that is put in the knockout hole where the wire enters. Most folks use metal work boxes for bigger outlets, not the cheapo plastic boxes you usually see for old work. You might need some staples to hold the wire to joists.

If you are adding a sub-panel, you need it, and circuit breakers. If you are putting in a 50 A subpanel, then you need 50 A breakers for it. Those go in your main panel, so you have to get the right kind of breakers that fit that panel. Then you need the linked pair of breakers for the outlet that go in the subpanel. You need the wire that goes between the main panel and the subpanel, and usually a short piece of conduit and the fixings for that. That connection is 4 wires, not 3. Make sure that the sub panel has a ground bar, bonded to the panel. You also need whatever you are going to use to hang the subpanel on the wall.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1041 days


#14 posted 07-14-2015 03:40 PM

Well I’m going to run it on the ceiling and down the wall, don’t really know what would be up to code but when we move next year I’ll be taking the wire and sub panel with me. Will 12-2 wire be sufficent enough or what do I need to check to get the right wire?

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4856 posts in 2278 days


#15 posted 07-14-2015 03:42 PM

That’s a good machine. I have the Delta version, which is nearly identical, and it is a solid performer. Mine actually runs on 110v.
Whatever electrical work you need to do will be well worth that nice addition to your shop.
Congrats

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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