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triangle help

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Forum topic by diamondpony posted 07-13-2015 03:50 PM 671 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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diamondpony

11 posts in 1725 days


07-13-2015 03:50 PM

I have been working on a project that requires a 3” x 3” x 3” hardwood triangle shape to be 12” long. Hoping some of you have done this before and can explain how to do it.

Thanks in advance,

Reid

-- diamondpony


14 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 938 days


#1 posted 07-13-2015 03:59 PM

Well, I guess somebody has to look stupid here, so it may was well be me. Are you saying that you want to join a bunch of triangles, each having 3” sides to form something else (a bigger triangle?) that has 12” sides? If that’s not what your are asking, then I would say that what you want to do is impossible.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

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jsuede

69 posts in 688 days


#2 posted 07-13-2015 04:11 PM

Bandsaw or a scrollsaw both with a tilting table and a fence of some sort is the only safe way I can think of, pushing something that small through an angled blade on the table saw sounds scary. If you could acquire a blank that was 3” square you would only need one well setup 45’ cut to make it. Don’t make the cut dead center, you want to offset it just enough for the blade kerf, leaving the corner on one piece, which will leave you with an equilateral triangle.

FWIW I have never done this before but this is how I would approach that problem.

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2324 days


#3 posted 07-13-2015 04:19 PM



... If you could acquire a blank that was 3” square you would only need one well setup 45 cut to make it.

...


Sorry, that won’t work, you will get a triangle that is 3×3 x 4.24 because the triangle would have one 90 degree angle and two 45 degree angles. What’s needed in the finished project is three 60 degree angles…

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Charles Maxwell's profile

Charles Maxwell

1081 posts in 3272 days


#4 posted 07-13-2015 04:21 PM

I assume the following: The triangle is equilateral meaning each internal angle is 60 degrees. The piece of wood is square and 12” in length. Place the wood on end. Measure and mark one side at 3”. Call that your base. Now, find the halfway point on the base line you just drew. Should 1.5” and 1.5” ie., the center. From that center point on the base draw a vertical line that is 90 degrees from the base. Now, from the right and left corners of the base draw two lines that are 3” and intersects the vertical line previously drawn from the base. these lines are your cut lines. You only need to make two cuts on your bandsaw to finish this. Set your table angle so the blade is in line with the first side you want to cut. Either side works. Your table should be set at approx 30 degrees. The second cut is a bit tricky because you now have a sharp edge on the side of the wood block that will ride the fence. you could mount you block to some sacrificial MDF to help guide the next cut. turn you wood around for this next cut and once again line up the blade with the second of the two 3” lines you drew earlier. Again, your table angle should be about 30 degrees. make the cut. all sides should now be 3” which is the hypotenuse of a 30-60-90 triangle.

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

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Charles Maxwell

1081 posts in 3272 days


#5 posted 07-13-2015 04:37 PM

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

View jsuede's profile

jsuede

69 posts in 688 days


#6 posted 07-13-2015 06:48 PM

My bad, it does not make an equilateral triangle. I blame not enough coffee, thank you for the correction.

View diamondpony's profile

diamondpony

11 posts in 1725 days


#7 posted 07-13-2015 10:48 PM

Thank you all for the input/help. Max “night janitor” should have been a teacher. ;-))

-- diamondpony

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1916 posts in 1220 days


#8 posted 07-13-2015 10:53 PM

He was a teacher…yours, just now.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View diamondpony's profile

diamondpony

11 posts in 1725 days


#9 posted 07-13-2015 10:53 PM

Thank you all for the input/help. Max “night janitor” should have been a teacher. ;-))

-- diamondpony

View leatherstocking's profile

leatherstocking

22 posts in 516 days


#10 posted 07-14-2015 12:08 AM

You could also do it on a table saw if it was 3 ft long, then cut to length.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

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leatherstocking

22 posts in 516 days


#11 posted 07-14-2015 12:12 AM

Also you could tack or glue the scrap from the first cut back on to run along the fence for the second cut. A few dabs of glue stick might work, and be easy to separate after the deed is done.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

View diamondpony's profile

diamondpony

11 posts in 1725 days


#12 posted 07-14-2015 01:23 AM

Table saw would be my choice of tool, John. Could you get into a little detail on the process using 3 ft. long piece.

-- diamondpony

View leatherstocking's profile

leatherstocking

22 posts in 516 days


#13 posted 07-14-2015 02:59 PM

A three foot piece would be a lot easier to handle than a one foot piece, keeping the fingers away from the blade.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

View leatherstocking's profile

leatherstocking

22 posts in 516 days


#14 posted 07-15-2015 12:59 AM

Same cuts as Charles diagrammed. The blade will be tilted about 30 deg., as zero is actually 90. You know, 90-30=60.
FOR SAFETY:
Make sure blade is tilted away from the fence. Don’t want a kickback because the 3×3 is trapped between the blade and the fence. Good idea to use feather boards for an operation like this, and push sticks of course.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

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