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Is laser transfer safe for cutting boards?

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Forum topic by JonCarpenter posted 07-13-2015 04:57 AM 671 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JonCarpenter

3 posts in 515 days


07-13-2015 04:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood burning laser transfer cutting boards end grain cutting boards solvent transfer woodworking

Knowing that laser printer toner can be very toxic if inhaled enough, I was wondering if anyone has any insight as to whether that toxicity correlated to oral ingestion as well? Is transferring a laser image to a cutting board is a safe practice? I’ve seen and read of a lot of people who do it, however I feel I have to err on the side of caution when it comes to the safety of my customers and family members. Help me out please.
Cheers.
Thanks.


6 replies so far

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 938 days


#1 posted 07-13-2015 04:04 PM

I would suggest that it depends more on what you intend to seal the image with than with the image/toner itself.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View dhaas's profile

dhaas

6 posts in 755 days


#2 posted 07-13-2015 10:47 PM

Surely you jest.

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JonCarpenter

3 posts in 515 days


#3 posted 07-13-2015 11:43 PM

I finish all my boards with mineral oil and beeswax. The freehand router inlays have a great look, but a poor return when time is considered and I’m looking for a more economical way of personalizing custom orders and remaining in a decent price range. Obviously a CNC would be ideal but I’m still paying off the drum sander ;)

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#4 posted 07-14-2015 12:16 AM

Knowing that laser printer toner can be very toxic if inhaled enough, I was wondering if anyone has any insight as to whether that toxicity correlated to oral ingestion as well?

First I’ve heard about it being toxic. Mostly carbon and iron oxide with a polymer mixed in to aid in melting… basically, it’s just an inert powder. It can cause irritation when inhaled (and I guess inhaling enough could be bad for you), but there is nothing really toxic about it that I know.

The MSDS for my HP printer cartridge (found here) states there is no physical, health or environmental hazards associated with the stuff, and no precautions are necessary when handling it. Other manufacturers may use a different polymer, but I doubt it would be any less safe.

Curious… since it’s intended to be melted, how do you intend to apply it? If just left as a powder, some carbon black might be more economical.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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JonCarpenter

3 posts in 515 days


#5 posted 07-14-2015 02:41 AM

Thanks for the input Brad. I planned on using a freshly printed image from a laser printer and transferring the image with a wood burning tool with a transfer tip attached. If you’re unfamiliar with the process it basically involves placing the image face down and reactivating the toner through heat, thus transferring a portion of the toner to the project.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7922 posts in 1845 days


#6 posted 07-14-2015 06:11 PM

Would you eat the toner or sprinkle it on your food?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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