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Cracked bowl

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Forum topic by ryn0tr3ks posted 07-13-2015 04:57 AM 902 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ryn0tr3ks

3 posts in 516 days


07-13-2015 04:57 AM

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to deal with this crack that I have in this wooden bowl that has an organic shape to it? I do not want to use wood glue because I will not be able to clamp the bowl for compression. It does not have to be sealed or hidden, I just want the crack to stop growing.

Thanks for the help!


16 replies so far

View kroginold's profile

kroginold

9 posts in 515 days


#1 posted 07-13-2015 10:13 AM

You might try using a resin like Alumilite

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1043 days


#2 posted 07-13-2015 12:24 PM

Epoxy, could inlay something in it, then just sand it flush and refinish it.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#3 posted 07-13-2015 12:40 PM

Looks like cedar or mulberry. I would let it dry completely before filling the crack or you will end up with more of it. Turn it to a bowl and then let it dry.

I used a walnut wedge for the large crack; glue/sawdust for the small ones.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View ryn0tr3ks's profile

ryn0tr3ks

3 posts in 516 days


#4 posted 07-13-2015 01:02 PM

mrjinx,

How would you recommend drying it out? the piece is already a bowl, the pictures just show the bottom side of it.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#5 posted 07-13-2015 03:41 PM

I would use sawdust or coffee grounds & CA glue to gill the crack.

Will have to pour in filler (whatever you use) tamp, apply glue several times.

I use a brush & dental pick to fill and tamp cracks before applying medium CA glue.

-- Bill

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3554 posts in 1234 days


#6 posted 07-13-2015 03:42 PM

I left mine in the house for about a year. During winter months with the dry air it was done drying by January. Main thing is to set it on something so there is airflow all the way around and the bottom.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

121 posts in 940 days


#7 posted 07-13-2015 04:02 PM

How long ago did you turn it? As others have said, you may want to wait a while to see how the crack develops. With the pith in the middle of the bottom of the bowl, you can expect more cracks forming as the bowl dries.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#8 posted 07-13-2015 07:35 PM

I would go ahead and fix the crack now because crack starts from the outside in. Once fill & glue might not see any more pith cracks. First picture has coffee ground fill and glue on one side but not the other side. No fill on second picture.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/160090

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/163562

-- Bill

View Snowbeast's profile

Snowbeast

61 posts in 805 days


#9 posted 07-13-2015 07:51 PM

Two part epoxy with some Pearlex powder for color will fill and repair that crack. Choose a complimentary color for the Pearlex and use the crack as a highlight.

Pearlex powder can be found at most hobby type stores – Hobby Lobby, etc. – or you could use a small drop of oil based paint in the epoxy for color.

View leatherstocking's profile

leatherstocking

22 posts in 519 days


#10 posted 07-13-2015 08:22 PM

Was the bowl turned of green wood? I have heard of people using PEG (poly ethyl glycol?) to dry such bowls. I think you soak the green bowl in a bucket of PEG for a few weeks, then it does not shrink. Shrinkage from drying is likely what is causing the crack. Someone on this forum probably knows more than I about this.
I guess it’s too late for the bowl in,the pic.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

View leatherstocking's profile

leatherstocking

22 posts in 519 days


#11 posted 07-13-2015 08:25 PM

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?c=&cat=1,190,42942,20080&p=20080

See link for more info on PEG

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1601 days


#12 posted 07-14-2015 12:08 PM

PEG is not the answer for this situation definite learning curve using that product!

Carvers & woodturners can use the stuff if wood still wet and soak in peg for a specified period based upon size, wood species & density etc. Once wood starts end checking and or cracking PEG is of no use.

-- Bill

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leatherstocking

22 posts in 519 days


#13 posted 07-14-2015 02:55 PM

As I said, too late for the bowl in the pic.

-- John, BC, Canada. Wherever I go, there I am.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7487 posts in 1474 days


#14 posted 07-14-2015 08:30 PM

I’ve had good luck using superglue and sawdust. I build up a small bit just by pinching the sawdust into the split with my fingers and then drip small amounts of superglue in. Allow to dry, and repeat till the whole split / crack is filed.
Just be aware that no matter what color dust you use, it WILL dry darker than what ever the bowl is made from.
.
.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View willie's profile

willie

533 posts in 1921 days


#15 posted 07-15-2015 12:34 AM

I’ve made several repairs similar to that with polyester resin. I just blocked off both sides of the crack with masking tape to contain all the resin. Fill in the crack slowly to avoid bubbles. After the resins sets up you will be able to sand it smooth and touch up the finish. I have used this in both hard and soft woods and so far it has enough flex in it to be able to move with the wood not crack or separate. This makes it easy to repair irregular shapes without having to cut out and fit a patch.

-- Every day above ground is a good day!!!

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