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Why did I buy these bandsaw blades?!

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Forum topic by ForestGrl posted 07-13-2015 02:35 AM 951 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


07-13-2015 02:35 AM

This is kind of a reverse engineering question. Going through my stack of bandsaw blades today, most of them rusty :-( I found 3 unopened envelopes with Starrett Flexback blades in them: 1/4” x 105”, 4 TPI, skip-tooth .025 kerf. Obviously, I was anticipating a particular project for them, but it seems like an odd configuration. Thin kerf, sort-of-low TPI, but narrow blade. What in the world would I cut with this? I’ve forgotten pretty much all I knew about bandsaw blades, but I do know I need some new ones, so if these are dispensable, I’ll sell them.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)


10 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#1 posted 07-13-2015 03:07 AM

Thick stock and tight radius curves would be perfect for that combination.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#2 posted 07-13-2015 03:25 AM


Thick stock and tight radius curves would be perfect for that combination.

- bigblockyeti

Wish that rang a bell. I had a couple of production projects that involved thin stock and tight curves, but nothing that I remember with thicker stock. Hmmmm, perhaps the Tole-painting ladies that wanted unfinished stuff for their classes? That must be it! (didn’t work out, LOL) Whadya think, should I save them for smaller bowl blanks? I’ll look up the radius minimum on Suffolk Machinery’s website.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View higtron's profile

higtron

207 posts in 2143 days


#3 posted 07-13-2015 04:56 AM

They would be good for band saw boxes.

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17172 posts in 2571 days


#4 posted 07-13-2015 11:55 AM

The rule of thumb for bandsawing st 3 teeth per thickness of what you are cutting. So a 4 tpi should be used for 3/4 and thicker stock!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#5 posted 07-13-2015 01:48 PM

Forestgrl, you bought them for cutting turning blanks. You are a turner, aren’t you?

If I could get 3 tpi on 1/4” blades, that’s what I’d be using.That’s the same length my saw uses, and I seem to get better cuts with the 1/4” than the 1/2”............ Jerry (in Tucson) .

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#6 posted 07-14-2015 06:27 PM

A 1/4 blade can be tensioned greater than a wider blade. That will result in straighter cuts when re-sawing. I’m guessing you are using a 14” band saw with a 6” riser. That combination doesn’t allow you to get adequate tension when using a wider blade.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#7 posted 07-14-2015 07:01 PM



A 1/4 blade can be tensioned greater than a wider blade.
- MrRon

What?

Thinking as a mechanical engineer I would think that I could apply more tension to a wider blade before the blade would break than I could apply to a narrower blade.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#8 posted 07-14-2015 08:50 PM

I think he’s referring to the fact that any given saw will be able to generate more tension in a blade with a smaller cross sectional area than one with a larger area. That being said, there’s a reason resaw blades are thicker and much wider than something you would use for tight radius work, a 1/4” blade doesn’t have very much beam strength, especially a thin one.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2709 days


#9 posted 07-15-2015 06:31 PM


A 1/4 blade can be tensioned greater than a wider blade.
- MrRon

What?

Thinking as a mechanical engineer I would think that I could apply more tension to a wider blade before the blade would break than I could apply to a narrower blade.

- WoodNSawdust


I didn’t word this well. What I meant to say was; small/lighter band saws can fully tension a smaller blade than a wider and thicker blade. I have heard of people using narrow blades to re-saw with better results over a wider blade. I’m not not saying wide blades are not good for re-sawing. They are preferred, but you have to have a strong and rigid saw to adequately tension the blade. They sell heavier springs for the tension system, but there is only so far you can go with a light machine.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 552 days


#10 posted 07-17-2015 05:14 AM


A 1/4 blade can be tensioned greater than a wider blade. That will result in straighter cuts when re-sawing. I m guessing you are using a 14” band saw with a 6” riser. That combination doesn t allow you to get adequate tension when using a wider blade.

- MrRon

Thanks for this info and the clarifications that followed! My absence the last few days is directly correlated with the amount of time spent using the band saw! First time I’ve used a 3/4” blade, and the Grizzly 1019Z has been brave, but sometimes it does seem like a bit of a slog through the bigger pieces (tallest one was 9”-10” high I think, green maple). I’m going to put a 1/2” blade on it tomorrow to cut some bowl blanks and smaller cherry. One thing that really helped was spraying PAM cooking spray on the blade.

PS: I’ve always used Timber Wolf blades to get the most out of this budget-level saw, they have worked great. Only thing is, I don’t know if the blades hanging on my wall are the ones that work best in green wood. But they will work!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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