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Black Locust? Wood ID help...

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Forum topic by RPhillips posted 07-12-2015 08:02 PM 975 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


07-12-2015 08:02 PM

Not sure what this is…

it’s hard…heavy…and not easy to work…

Black Locust?

Wiped with mineral spirits for pics…

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...


18 replies so far

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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


#1 posted 07-12-2015 08:11 PM

-uploaded pics-

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#2 posted 07-12-2015 09:36 PM

Lignum viate

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upchuck

540 posts in 1130 days


#3 posted 07-12-2015 09:44 PM

These two sites might help you narrow down your guesses and eliminate some of the wilder ones.

http://www.wood-database.com/
or
http://www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/

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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


#4 posted 07-12-2015 10:11 PM

Aj2, I think you may be right.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


#5 posted 07-12-2015 11:30 PM

I’m not sure… but looking at this pic from Hobbit House, I’m still thinking Locust. Lignum Viate looks have a more amber presence that I’m not seeing.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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TheWoodenOyster

1275 posts in 1400 days


#6 posted 07-12-2015 11:46 PM

Looks a lot like ash to me. But ash isn’t very heavy. That’s my guess.

I’ve never worked with locust

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

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rustfever

716 posts in 2775 days


#7 posted 07-12-2015 11:59 PM

I have logged off a Black Locust tree. It has been slabbed into 5/4, 7/4, & 9/4. It looks very much as does your wood. And yes, it is hard to machine.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#8 posted 07-13-2015 12:47 AM

Darn it wrong again,one of these days I’ll get one right.Dont know what black locust smells like but lignum has a distict spicy smell.

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RogerM

762 posts in 1864 days


#9 posted 07-13-2015 12:55 AM

Osage Orange maybe?

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#10 posted 07-13-2015 01:22 AM

I think that it is either black locust or osage orange. Black locust tends to be more of greenish brown while osage is sulfur yellow. In both, all the pores are packed with tyloses and the latewood pores are in strings.

Ash pores are not packed with tyloses.

Because the pores in the end grain are not easy to see in your pic, I am going with black locust because of color.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


#11 posted 07-13-2015 11:36 AM

It has no noticeable odor, but I only hit it on the TS and surfaced with hand planes. It’s also at couple years old, if that helps.

All the pics I’ve seen of Locust make lean that way, but I’ll look at Osage tonight.

thanks for the contributions guys, appreciated.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1941 days


#12 posted 07-13-2015 11:58 AM

Typically, black locust has only one or two years of sapwood, all the rest being heartwood. This is one feature that can be used to help differentiate black locust.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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JayT

4783 posts in 1676 days


#13 posted 07-13-2015 01:08 PM

I’m with Danny about the color being more typical of black locust. Osage is generally very yellow, though can be lighter. Here’s some being made into a mallet head.

If in doubt between locust and Osage Orange, drop some sawdust or shavings in a glass of warm water. If the water turns yellow, it’s Osage Orange—the yellow pigment in that wood is water soluble.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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FellingStudio

93 posts in 1147 days


#14 posted 07-13-2015 01:59 PM

Bury it, if it’s still solid in 100 years, it’s black locust. :)

(I know, not very helpful … would definitely identify it though.)

-- Jesse Felling - http://www.fellingstudio.com

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RPhillips

1110 posts in 1301 days


#15 posted 07-13-2015 10:55 PM

Great idea JayT!

Definitely not yellow, so between the two I say Locust.

I got this wood from work, it was sitting outside in the elements for quite some time before I brought it home a year ago or so. It was probably used a rigging/staging material on something shipped into the refinery, so who knows how long it was setting outside before I found it. It only took a light planing to remove the silvering, other than that, it’s in great condition.

Thanks for the help guys.

-- Rob - Indianapolis IN - Learning... one mistake at a time...

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