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Joining Dissimilar Woods

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Forum topic by DocSavage45 posted 07-12-2015 02:39 AM 786 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


07-12-2015 02:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question joining modern arts and crafts traditional

Looking for suggestions on what not to do and why.

I’m going to be trying out different joinery to see how it looks . A little like Krenov might do. Two woods of similar density should have similar expansion and contraction rates? So a joint made in winter dryness won’t split in summer swelter. But what woods should not go together?

Would appreciate your feedback on what I should and shouldn’t do, and why.

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher


14 replies so far

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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#1 posted 07-12-2015 02:41 AM

I’ll respond when getting back from my feeding chores. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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jmartel

6574 posts in 1615 days


#2 posted 07-12-2015 02:54 AM

Here’s a chart that I found online for a lot of common woods. Not sure it’s only dependent on density.

http://workshoppages.com/WS/Articles/Wood-Movement-Charts.pdf

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#3 posted 07-12-2015 03:17 AM

Doc, I may be getting dull in my old age but I’m trying to imagine a scenario where it would make a difference. I’m sure there are some but I just can’t picture it. Can you describe your specific circumstance ?

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#4 posted 07-12-2015 03:24 AM

I’ve never found that to be an issue Tom but I’m no Krenov ether :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#5 posted 07-12-2015 03:28 AM

Yonak,

At present I have ash, walnut, lots of pine and some elm. In addition I have spaulted (soft) maple. I’ve notice the difference in weight and density of the elm and walnut vs. The pine and maple.

I’m Considering laminating rhe woods as one option just to see what happens, and doing different types of joinery. EG. Dovetail, finger, and mitered w/ and w /out splines.

The pdf from jmartel is an excellent tool.

Thought I responded, but apparently didn’t save it.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#6 posted 07-12-2015 03:30 AM

jmartel,

Thahks! I guess I didn’t save the response. LOL! It’s really a great tool.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#7 posted 07-12-2015 03:33 AM

Jim,

Krenov did some great ,imaginative work. I have a friend Kintaro Yazawa from Miazaki Japan who told me he saw one of the pieces and the wood was splitting. I’m not him , but if I build it. LOL! I want it to last awhile.

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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michelletwo

2594 posts in 2481 days


#8 posted 07-12-2015 09:21 AM

ok, as a segmenter I do have knowledge of wood variations. It can raise havoc . Now in other areas, such as face to face laminations, you could experience issues. Real dense woods have less and less dense have more. So if you laminated two diverse woods, face grain to face grain, you could very easily get splits over time. Laminating them side grain to side grain would not be an issue.

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CharlieK

467 posts in 3258 days


#9 posted 07-12-2015 12:34 PM

Great question, Tom. I don’t know the answer, but I have never heard of it being a problem.

-- Adjustable Height Workbench Plans http://www.Jack-Bench.com

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Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2574 days


#10 posted 07-12-2015 03:01 PM

I have a bowl I carved in 1964 or 1965 in wood shop, pine on top and mahogany on the bottom, face glued. I guess I can credit the low humidity and an easy indoor life for the lack of splitting.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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Yonak

979 posts in 986 days


#11 posted 07-12-2015 03:40 PM


I’m Considering laminating rhe woods as one option just to see what happens, and doing different types of joinery. EG. Dovetail, finger, and mitered w/ and w /out splines.

- DocSavage45

Thanks, Doc. I don’t believe with any of the joinery you have mentioned there’s enough cross grain lamination area to be concerned about, save full face lamination, as michelle mentions.

On the other hand, I have glued hardwood to plywood as a substrate which, theoretically, has no movement, with no separation issues over time.

I believe it is a low level concern, although it certainly couldn’t hurt to experiment. Unfortunately, you may not see reliable results for quite a long time.

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jdh122

879 posts in 2283 days


#12 posted 07-12-2015 03:46 PM

I agree with Yonak – I can’t imagine that simply joining two different boards edge-to-edge could possibly cause a problem,since the area in contact is so small. But with laminations I can see it possibly causing some issues.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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DocSavage45

7705 posts in 2308 days


#13 posted 07-12-2015 04:56 PM

Michelletwo, CharlieK, Yonak, jdh122,

Thanks for your input and opinions based on your experiences!

The humidity in my shop today is 85% Have ventilation fans set up to keep air flowing, but hot warm air over concrete? Even when I have the AC on and it’s full blast the humidity remains high.

Then in the winter I have forced air heating that doesn’t go below 58 degrees, but the humidity is down in the 20 to 30% range. These are the stresses of indoor environments. At least here in my world, so I wanted some input before going off on a creative idea that might not work after putting time and energy into it?

Thanks for responding!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#14 posted 07-12-2015 05:06 PM

I have chest made with cedar,walnut and cherry. It has been sitting in a studio with no temperature controls for two years, so far so good. I think soft wood on hard wood could become problematic.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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