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Low Angle Jack Plane

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Forum topic by loiblb posted 07-11-2015 10:23 PM 979 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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loiblb

109 posts in 523 days


07-11-2015 10:23 PM

Low Angle Jack Plane

Any real difference between Lie-Nielsen Low Angle Jack Plane No. 62 and the Veritas low angle jack plane? It looks like both are about the same cost. The LN may take longer to get maybe due to back order.
I have two Veritas planes now a router and block plane. They do the job ok and are well made.
I’m looking at using the low angle for all around use plus shooting. I have a Tormek t7 but have no time on it, hope it can keep a low angle up and running

I have two smoothers and a antique jack all by Stanley that have seen better days and all need tune up bad.


13 replies so far

View Mattyboy's profile

Mattyboy

50 posts in 546 days


#1 posted 07-12-2015 04:26 AM

There are some who say that a #4 smoother (for instance) can do just about anything a low angle plane can do, given that it is sharp enough. If you want to save yourself some money, try tuning up one of your smoothers, sharpen it up really well and try it on something you wanted a low angle for.

-- Matt, Northern CA

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#2 posted 07-12-2015 11:33 AM

I have the Veritas LA jack. Can’t say that it gets a lot of use, but that’s no fault of the plane. If you choose that one I’d suggest getting the PM V11 50º blade with it. The irons are so short they are tricky to position on the Tormek jig, especially the 25º one, but it can be done. Can’t answer the question versus the LN, haven’t ever handled one of them. As for the opinion about needing one, in my case I probably don’t…but it’s a hand plane and they are cool to have. I can tell you this, they are great for shooting.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View RogerBean's profile

RogerBean

1602 posts in 2421 days


#3 posted 07-12-2015 12:42 PM

Both are fine tools. I happen to have the LN #62 with the auxiliary blades and hot dog and find that it performs as advertised. It’s nice to have the higher angle and toothed blades for those special problem areas. It’s made like jewelry. LN planes tend to be very traditional in appearance, which I prefer. The Veritas planes are more contemporary in design, often with a more “swoopy” look that I don’t care for, but they are fine tools if you prefer that design. Hard to go wrong with either one.
Roger

-- "Everybody makes mistakes. A craftsman always fixes them." (Monty Kennedy, "The Checkering and Carving of Gunstocks", 1952)

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1542 days


#4 posted 07-12-2015 02:16 PM

Some like the LN while the rest like Veritas.

The big difference is the number of blades for Veritas. Huge array to choose from. I have most of it and love them.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 07-12-2015 02:22 PM

I have the LN version and it is, as expected a very nice tool.
I mainly use it in my shooting board.
I also like it or flush up stiles and rails on door bottoms.
I see no advantage in wild grained wood (maybe its me).

I read somewhere if you do the geometry of adding the bedding angle to the hone angle I think the effective blade angle is something like 40 degrees I think.

The reality is, I think my #6 WoodRiver does a pretty good job at all the tasks I mentioned.

Bottom line, I doubt I would buy one knowing what I know now.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2535 days


#6 posted 07-12-2015 02:40 PM

I have the LN and love it. Can’t speak to the other as I don’t have it There are figured woods where it came in handy when another chipped. If I have a board that has squirly grain it’s my go to. I know the LN’s are not cheap but they are the nicest planes I’ve ever put in my hands

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6579 posts in 1618 days


#7 posted 07-12-2015 03:24 PM



I see no advantage in wild grained wood (maybe its me).

- rwe2156

Buy another blade with a 50 deg bevel or add a 50 deg micro bevel and you will eliminate all tearout completely. That’s the biggest advantage for a low angle plane is changing the angle for different tasks.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

296 posts in 3436 days


#8 posted 07-12-2015 04:59 PM

The LN is a smaller plane that the Veritas. The LN has a 2” wide blade, and the Veritas (LV) has a 2 1/4”.

While the LN is a very nice plane, it is based on the vintage Stanley #62 (which I have), and has all the design features of that plane, only built to a much, much higher level with better materials and blade steel. The LV is a more advanced design, with many features that make it a more reliable plane to set up, and to use.

The best thing to do is try them alongside one another, if this is possible.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1119 days


#9 posted 07-12-2015 05:45 PM

I have the LN #62 and I find it difficult to set up because it is basically a huge block plane. I’m very good at setting up a standard bench plane for an even cut by eye and a few swipes across a board, but fidgeting and moving the blade back and forth just isn’t for me. Once I set it up, I run it into the ground and then it sits dull for a few months before I decide to sharpen the blade again, which, because I don’t use any sharpening jigs, I’m stuck with the factory bevel in any case.

Cliff Notes:
-If the veritas is easier to set up, buy it.
-Either have a good sharpening jig to consistently put a microbevel on your blade, or purchase many blades with various bevel angles.

-- -Dan

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

296 posts in 3436 days


#10 posted 07-12-2015 05:52 PM

Correction:

Do not buy many blades with differing angles!

Only purchase blades with a 25 degree primary bevel. Add the desired angle via a secondary bevel. This requires the removal of less steel, and enables one to add a camber. You would not be able to do this efficiently with a high primary bevel angle.

I wrote this severe years ago:

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTechniques/TheSecretToCamberinBUPlaneBlades.html

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#11 posted 07-12-2015 07:27 PM


I see no advantage in wild grained wood (maybe its me).

- rwe2156

Buy another blade with a 50 deg bevel or add a 50 deg micro bevel and you will eliminate all tearout completely. That s the biggest advantage for a low angle plane is changing the angle for different tasks.

- jmartel

I was thinking of getting a higher pitch frog for my smoother, but this would be a cheaper option.

Thanks I knew that but forgot about it.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2200 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 07-12-2015 07:33 PM



I have the LN #62 and I find it difficult to set up because it is basically a huge block plane. I m very good at setting up a standard bench plane for an even cut by eye and a few swipes across a board, but fidgeting and moving the blade back and forth just isn t for me. Once I set it up, I run it into the ground and then it sits dull for a few months before I decide to sharpen the blade again, which, because I don t use any sharpening jigs, I m stuck with the factory bevel in any case.
- Pezking7p
Hmmm I wish that wasn’t happening to you. I haven’t had a problem like this so I can’t tell you why.
Seems the blade is pretty close every time I drop it in. Just a light tap or two and tighten it down.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2677 posts in 2652 days


#13 posted 07-12-2015 07:57 PM

I believe the LN version doesn’t have a lateral adjustment lever, you have to do it by touch or with a small hammer. I have the LV that I got cheap as a factory second and it is fantastic… super heavy and such a long toe that it’s stable getting the cut started. I use the low angle on really dense woods or end grain, anywhere that a standard bevel down plane starts having trouble.

-- Allen, Colorado

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