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How do I make this fence

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Forum topic by whiteshoecovers posted 07-11-2015 01:13 PM 1137 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


07-11-2015 01:13 PM

Specifically, how would you make the horizontal beam through which all of the small vertical staves go through? I know this is a picture of a vinyl fence but I’d like to recreate it in wood.


15 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3678 days


#1 posted 07-11-2015 01:24 PM

Personally, I would make it in two pieces, using a dado blade on the table saw, then glue the two halves together over the verticals.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#2 posted 07-11-2015 01:26 PM

Cut a dado on the staves maybe dado the horizontal member also. Really need to see the other side.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Crank50's profile

Crank50

173 posts in 1036 days


#3 posted 07-11-2015 01:38 PM

Two horizontal rails and either empty space between the verticals or filler blocks between the verticals.
If filler blocks used, I’d seal the end grain somehow before assembly and caulk the verticals in place.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 07-11-2015 01:55 PM

You could do dados cutting top rail and that panel piece from one board and rip the pieces into two. Of course you have to double and glue two piecs together.

However it would be much easier to cut filler blocks. That’s how I’d do it. Use the proper glue.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

347 posts in 1876 days


#5 posted 07-11-2015 02:42 PM

Norm shows how

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RckMTTTDTv0

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#6 posted 07-11-2015 07:01 PM

Any of the methods suggested would work equally well. My concern would be how to seal the wood from the elements; lots of small crevices for moisture to get into. It may sound like overkill, but I would use either an epoxy cement or a marine grade of adhesive. There is a good reason why that fence is made of vinyl.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2545 days


#7 posted 07-12-2015 04:13 AM

One of the old Greenlee Mortising machines such as the 225 can make up to an 1-1/4” and bigger
mortises easily, if you can find the hollow mortising chisel to fit the machine. After a 3/4” or bigger
mortise the spring does not always return the chisel automatically and you have to reach down and
pull up on the pedal, but it sure beats doing it by hand or in a five step process like Norm did. As
MrRon stated sealing the wood and holding the joint would be critical.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View whiteshoecovers's profile

whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


#8 posted 07-12-2015 12:45 PM

I do like the dado idea. I could only dado one side as deep as the entire stave and fit another flat board to the other side. My concern there is my ability to dado across a 6’ board with the equipment I have. I’ll try to make a jig or something but if that doesn’t work I think the blocking method might take it. We’re in Colorado so it’s a pretty dry climate, and I plan on using cedar so I am not so concerned about sealing the wood. The most I’d do is a one-step stain after the fence is complete.

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whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


#9 posted 07-13-2015 12:49 PM

What about pinning each one with a dowel top and bottom? It would be very easy to set a jig to drill a hole in the center of every stave, and periodically in the horizontal beam. The bottom portion of the stave would be a separate piece also pinned on each end with a dowel pin. Assembly might be a pain when trying to align all of the lower staves at the same time. I could imagine making a jig for that too: to hold everything at even spacing to fit the top horizontal beam onto all of the lower staves with dowels already placed.

I was sketching up the dado idea and started to get worried about the thin ligament it would leave which would be very fragile during fabrication and assembly.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#10 posted 07-13-2015 01:34 PM

If you are set on dadoing instead of filler blocks you are going to use a lot of energy making saw dust for a fence. A dado to two is no big deal, but this is a lot of dust making and wear and tear on a blade.
I might suggest one more alternative of making two or three cross cuts, the depth of the slot you want, then pop the waste out with a chisel.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View whiteshoecovers's profile

whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


#11 posted 07-14-2015 06:03 PM

Thanks for all the responses so far? Any thoughts on my idea to pin the staves?

And what about the butt joint for the stringers? Any suggestions for that?

View crank49's profile

crank49

3980 posts in 2430 days


#12 posted 07-15-2015 07:01 PM

Pins are ok but I think it would be almost imposible to make all the holes before assembly and get them to line up.
Why not pre-drill one rail then use that hole as a guide to punch through the other two pieces after assembly.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

View whiteshoecovers's profile

whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


#13 posted 07-15-2015 07:10 PM



Pins are ok but I think it would be almost imposible to make all the holes before assembly and get them to line up.
Why not pre-drill one rail then use that hole as a guide to punch through the other two pieces after assembly.

- crank49

I’m thinking about first constructing the fence in panels that will then be mounted to the posts which will already be set in the ground. I’ll use a sleeve over the post to help this type of assembly. I’ll make the panels after all the posts are set so I can adjust the length of each one a bit here and there to accommodate any difference in the distance between posts. So with the pins, I imagine a jig on my drill press will set an even spacing for all rails.

I’m considering this method since I do not want any fasteners to show (no pocket screws) and can’t figure out a better way to do it. Suggestions are welcomed.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#14 posted 07-16-2015 01:20 PM

Don’t mean to be a spoiler, but I have my doubts about the durability of this design.

Its very decorative, but IMO the design of this fence will not hold up long term due to water accumulating on the flat surfaces between the pickets which will eventually work into cracks.

My thoughts are use solid wood instead of pickets.
Match the curve of the pickets and use the same field as the door.
Leave the gap in the door open.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View whiteshoecovers's profile

whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 544 days


#15 posted 07-16-2015 01:37 PM



Don t mean to be a spoiler, but I have my doubts about the durability of this design.

Its very decorative, but IMO the design of this fence will not hold up long term due to water accumulating on the flat surfaces between the pickets which will eventually work into cracks.

My thoughts are use solid wood instead of pickets.
Match the curve of the pickets and use the same field as the door.
Leave the gap in the door open.

- rwe2156

I really appreciate this input. I am in Denver and water really doesn’t accumulate here. A day after we get 6” of snow it’s all gone, and about 30 min after a heavy rain you’d think it’d been sunny all day. 5280!

Any alternative ideas on how to join the rails to the post without having exposed fasteners?

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