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Levelling Concrete Floor

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Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 07-11-2015 12:15 PM 1027 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


07-11-2015 12:15 PM

Hey guys,

Part of my shop floor used to be an apron off the barn where equipment was stored and it is sloped about 2-3” over 14 feet.

Looking for advice/suggestions on what kind of concrete.

I’m concerned about adhesion and cracking where the concrete tapers match the slope.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


19 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#1 posted 07-11-2015 12:36 PM

You may be better off jackhammering that floor and pouring a new one. Or run sleepers across that are shimmed on the low end and put plywood down.

View JeffMartineau's profile

JeffMartineau

78 posts in 520 days


#2 posted 07-11-2015 12:41 PM

I know there’s a stuff out there that they sell that lifts the entire slab to level driveways and garages and things like that. It’s almost like expandable foam for insulation. Maybe that would work with your existing floor?

-- -Jeff. My shop is huge, it just doesn't have a ceiling. Or walls.

View kooldecker's profile

kooldecker

59 posts in 1036 days


#3 posted 07-11-2015 01:07 PM

Im a concrete man, I may be be able to help. there are several products out there that would suit your needs. I have a few questions I would like to ask first.
—how big is this area? I mean just rough square footage
—you mentioned it was an apron, is it outside or is it inside?
—What kind of traffic will it be seeing, I mean is it foot traffic, heavy equipment , vehicular?
If you would like to PM me that is completely fine. I will certainly give any advice I can to help out a fellow jock.

-- " I dont understand......I cut that board AT LEAST 4 times and its STILL too short!"

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#4 posted 07-11-2015 02:47 PM

Area approximately 10 X 20
It is inside (its my shop floor)
Mainly foot traffic & occasional rolling a machine across.

If it matters, it was broom finished pretty rough.
I thought about pressure wash/apply bonding agent/start at lowest point using sakrete.
What I’m mostly worried about is the where the concrete will be thin it will probably start breaking up.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2576 days


#5 posted 07-11-2015 02:48 PM

That slope is there for water to run off away from the building (~1/8 per foot). If you are not going to cover it, you could get water inside the building when it rains.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#6 posted 07-11-2015 03:06 PM

Its inside my shop!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6476 posts in 2065 days


#7 posted 07-11-2015 03:11 PM

You could also pour self leveler on it. 200sqft with an average depth of 1.5” would require a fair amount of product however. Maybe 50 to 60 50lb bags plus primer. $1200 range, if I was to guess.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2710 days


#8 posted 07-11-2015 06:38 PM

200 sq ft of concrete isn’t all that much. I too would consider breaking it up and pour a new slab to match the existing floor. The most direct way is most often the best way to go. “Mickey Mousing” only results in aggravation, time lost and added expense. The main thing is: Do it right the first time and avoid doing it all over again later. I have learned that lesson before; trying to save a buck, only ending up spending a lot more fixing it.

View JerrodMcCrary's profile

JerrodMcCrary

86 posts in 1074 days


#9 posted 07-11-2015 07:11 PM

Why do you need it leveled? Seems like that would be hard to notice 2-3 inches. I would probably just rip some wood runners and put plywood on top of them if all it is foot traffic and occasional rolling a machine across.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 948 days


#10 posted 07-11-2015 07:33 PM

I thought about the plywood.

I just thought someone would have a quick and easy idea without getting into a lot of work.

I think I’ve got better things to do ;-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#11 posted 07-12-2015 12:33 PM

Self leveling concrete is usually tiled over. I would think it will break apart at your thinnest point. You could do asphalt tile or a cheap engineered flooring over that.

View ChrisBarrett's profile

ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 525 days


#12 posted 07-16-2015 05:16 PM

I have the same question, my basement floor is really rough and I was wondering if it was possible to pour self leveling on it and have it work out. It’s probably 800 sq feet though. Would it crack apart at the thing parts?

View Bieser's profile

Bieser

176 posts in 1502 days


#13 posted 09-01-2015 01:55 AM

I had a concrete floor in my new shop that was an old garage that was very uneven and cracked. I like working on wood floors so I decided to just lay sleepers down and put a plywood floor with cheap laminate on top of that. I would have broken the floor out if I was going to keep concrete, but would rather work on wood so it didn’t take much convincing.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2417 posts in 2389 days


#14 posted 09-01-2015 02:33 AM



I thought about the plywood.

I just thought someone would have a quick and easy idea without getting into a lot of work.

I think I ve got better things to do ;-)

- rwe2156

Laying down some 2×4 and applying plywood on it is a LOT simpler than trying to level with concrete and it is reversible. I have done this same thing in my garage/shop. Good thing because a few years later I moved and took that wooden floor with me and returned the area to just a garage.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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rustfever

716 posts in 2777 days


#15 posted 09-01-2015 02:42 AM

I, too am a concrete contractor. I’ve place thousands upon thousand of yard of concrete, mostly in the industrial arena.
In my opinion, there are two ways of correcting your slope problem. Either remove and replace the existing concrete [best] OR laying a sloped wooden floor upon the old slab [OK]
The first is the most effective, the second may work if you meet some special conditions. Those special conditions would be recognized and specified by a design professional.
There is no ‘Magic Pill’ to help.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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