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Not sure how to approach using my wide ogee router bit ?

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Forum topic by HarleySoftailDeuce posted 10-07-2009 07:27 PM 783 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HarleySoftailDeuce

273 posts in 2072 days


10-07-2009 07:27 PM

Hi LJ folks,
I’m in the process of building cherry doors with raised panels. I bought a set of cope and stick Freud bit, along with a wide angle ogee panel bit. What speed do I run this wide bit at, and how much stock should I remove at a time? I suppose I should try it on some scrap soft lumber first? The panels will be glued up cherry hardwood. Although I have good tools, I’m new to this stuff, and learn as I go. I don’t want to get hurt, or damage my wood or bits. All the advice I can get will help me immensely.

-- Paul, Bristol,Rhode Island


6 replies so far

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2178 days


#1 posted 10-07-2009 07:31 PM

You’ll want to run the panel bit as slow as you can with your router and take maybe 3 passes to get to the final dimension. As you said, practice on scrap first to get a feel for it before you run the risk of ruining the panel.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2475 days


#2 posted 10-07-2009 07:49 PM

Paul, here are recommended speeds for router bits based on size:

1/8” to 1” 24,000 to 18,000 rpm
1 1/4” to 2” 18,000 to 16,000 rpm
2 1/4” to 2 1/2” 16,000 to 12,000 rpm
2 3/4” to 3 1/2” 12,000 to 10,000 rpm

I assume that your panel bit is 3 1/2” so your router will need to be set at 10,000 rpm.

It would not hurt to try this on scrap at first. As far as stock removal here is the way I do it:

you zero out the bearing on the bit and raise it about 1/4” above the table. Then route the edges of the panel beginning with the end grain first. Once all four sides are completed then raise the bit a little less than 1/4” and follow the same process. On the next sequence take a light passes checking the panel’s fit in the dado until you get the edge thickness that you want. Bear in mind that this should be a little snug since you will need to sand and finish the panel before gluing up the assembled panel. This is done to prevent the glue from the cope and stick glue up from gluing the panel as well which needs to float in the panel assembly.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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HarleySoftailDeuce

273 posts in 2072 days


#3 posted 10-07-2009 08:10 PM

Hey Scott, Thanks a whole lot for this help. I’ll be sure to follow the speeds and details. I’ve got a whole lot to learn, ...that’s for sure! :)

-- Paul, Bristol,Rhode Island

View HarleySoftailDeuce's profile

HarleySoftailDeuce

273 posts in 2072 days


#4 posted 10-07-2009 08:11 PM

Hey Scott, Thanks a whole lot for this help. I’ll be sure to follow the speeds and details. I’ve got a whole lot to learn, ...that’s for sure! :)
Thanks also to Julian for your help.
So far, I still have all my fingers.

-- Paul, Bristol,Rhode Island

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#5 posted 10-07-2009 08:13 PM

Scott, your answers are always so thorough and informative, I don’t know how you find time for woodworking.

On behalf of all us LJ’s, I just wanted to point this out and say “Thanks!”

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11659 posts in 2341 days


#6 posted 10-08-2009 01:23 AM

Great info , Scott : ) Thank you for the details . My only question that has plagued me for years , is , if you don’t have a variable speed router with a dial indicating the router bit speed , then how do you know what RPM you’re turning the bit at ? I have a router speed control for my PC routers , but there are no speed markings on it that indicate the speed. : (

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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