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Table Saw Blade recommendation

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Forum topic by NoSpace posted 07-06-2015 06:33 AM 1304 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NoSpace

73 posts in 700 days


07-06-2015 06:33 AM

I have a basic understanding of cross-cutting vs. ripping, and why different shaped teeth work better in one application vs. the other. The blade that came with my DeWalt contractor saw was a “combo” blade, which I believe aims to be good at both cuts but probably without excelling at either.

I quickly upgraded to what I believe is an 80 tooth Diablo blade (10 inch), the best I could find at what you folks call the big orange store or something like that, and I’m very happy with the results. But lately, I’ve taken things to the next level and experimenting with Padauk, Zebrawood, Ebony etc., and it’s not so smooth of an operation. Crosscutting was alright save the ebony though with care, I got through it without burning it.

After crosscutting, I moved on to ripping the Padauk, and it wasn’t easy. I had to clean up the edges afterward by sanding even after a couple of light passes over the edge. So I got to thinking, what is that 80 tooth Diablo blade meant for? I don’t remember it being marketed to any application in particular, and my guess it’s specialized for cross-cuts.

To go a little easier on the saw and to keep things safe, I’m wondering if there is a high-quality rip blade I should be using to get through these really nasty woods? If the edge isn’t perfect, I don’t mind, I can clean it with jointer or sand it. First priority is to get a nice straight cut safely and a little easier on the saw.


30 replies so far

View jinkyjock's profile

jinkyjock

487 posts in 1033 days


#1 posted 07-06-2015 10:00 AM

NoSpace,
without knowing all the details I would guess that any 80 tooth blade is def.
for cross-cutting only.
Ripping with this blade, especially in the woods you have listed,
will blunt the blade pretty quickly.
A specialist ripping blade is best.

Couple of hints for reducing “Tear Out”.
Install a zero-clearance insert,
if possible use a “Sacrificial” fence when cross-cutting,
or make a sled.

Adjust blade height, 5-6 teeth showing above wood.
Cheers, Jinky (James).

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NoSpace

73 posts in 700 days


#2 posted 07-06-2015 02:48 PM

any recommendations on a particular rip blade? I guess where I’m a little stuck is at the orange store, all the nice looking blades appear to be for cross-cutting. I’m sure I can google this but if someone probably has some experience here that would save me some time in trial-and-error…

View pulchridude's profile

pulchridude

14 posts in 515 days


#3 posted 07-06-2015 02:57 PM

I used to have a Freud Diablo rip blade for my TS that I got at a big orange store, worked pretty well in all kinds of woods, and it was thin kerf which made it cut even better (not so much drain on the motor). HOWEVER, after a few months use, I took a look at my blade and one of the high carbon teeth had chipped off somewhere along the line. I didn’t notice it in the cutting, the other teeth must have covered for it, but it didn’t make me very happy with the QC on the saw manufacturing. I then bought a Forrest rip saw. Now all of my TS blades are Forrest, they cost more, but the quality is unquestionably better than what you can get in the big box stores.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#4 posted 07-06-2015 03:09 PM

I like Forrest blades. Youll have to order them but they are nice.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View John L's profile

John L

148 posts in 623 days


#5 posted 07-06-2015 03:17 PM

Freud makes good blades, and that is what I use. But I never throw my dull blades out. I’m a hoarder, so naturally I am getting ready to sharpen my blades. In fact this may be part of the problem you are experiencing. If you are going to be using your table saw a good deal, it may pay to sharpen your own blades. Its not that hard.

Jim Steinbrecher, has a Youtube video on how he sharpens his blades. Its simple, easy to make, and it seems like a great way to go. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZljcSY732NE&list=LLCYNDi9ieDPcJ1pfRbKbNAw&index=17 . I finally got my diamond blade in the other day, and I am almost ready to sharpen my first one. It came with a 1/2” hole, and I had to drill it out to a 5/8” hole in order to fit in my arbor.

This will also give you an opportunity to learn all about how the shape and angle of the teeth play an important part in the cut of the wood. Its really fascinating, and I have used my academic training to research the thing in detail. But anyway, the fellow in the video has done most of the work for us on this. Here’s a link to the explanation of teeth and how their shape plays an important part. http://vermontamerican.com/article/circular-saw-blade-anatomy-grind-types/ .

Note that ripping requires the simple “flat top grind”(FTG), and cross cutting uses the “alternate top bevel”(ATB). And the Combination tooth blade uses a combination, with sets of five teeth. The first one is a FTG, and the remaining four are ATB. It makes sharpening blades a little bit more complicated, but it worth the time. That way you don’t have to keep throwing away perfectly good, but dull blades. Or if you are like me, hoarding them all. ;)

-- Tolerance becomes a crime when applied to evil - Thomas Mann

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Fred Hargis

3924 posts in 1952 days


#6 posted 07-06-2015 03:20 PM

I recommend you look beyond the box stores. The better quality blades will be found on line, and while there are a slew of good ones; The Freud P410, the Forest WW2 in a 40 tooth version, and the Infinity Combo Max certainly deserve a look. They are all available in thin kerf versions. I would suspect that any blade with 80 teeth (in a 10” size) isn’t going to rip very well, though it seems like it be great on cross cuts depending on tooth geometry.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View skatefriday's profile

skatefriday

380 posts in 942 days


#7 posted 07-06-2015 03:30 PM

Yup, as with most things you can’t get anything of any real quality from
the two big box stores. I really don’t know why this is, but Amazon is your
friend here.

Both CMT and Freud make good blades. But I’d spend the extra money
for Freud’s professional blades and not the Diablo.

I have the CMT 201.024.10 for ripping.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19167 posts in 2134 days


#8 posted 07-06-2015 03:33 PM

Our resident tablesaw and blade expert, Knotscott….
Has made several postings, that may be of help….
http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/46865#comment-2013785

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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knotscott

7206 posts in 2835 days


#9 posted 07-06-2015 08:40 PM


Our resident tablesaw and blade expert, Knotscott….
Has made several postings, that may be of help….
http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/46865#comment-2013785

- DIYaholic

It’s kind of a long read, but I’d start with this one. ... read through to at least the section that talks about how the blade is only one part of the equation….

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

487 posts in 2781 days


#10 posted 07-06-2015 09:47 PM

You obviously have the internet, so the only other thing holding you back from “any blade in the world” is a credit/debit card… That said no matter where you are located I am willing to bet other blades are available at least semi-locally if you have the need to buy in person.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

757 posts in 1858 days


#11 posted 07-06-2015 10:18 PM

Buy a Forrest Woodworker II (WW10487125) and pitch the rest of your saw blades.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1933 posts in 1448 days


#12 posted 07-06-2015 10:32 PM

My recommendation is to get a Freud glue line rip. I have been using one for years with no problems and it has been sharpened a couple of times.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1820 days


#13 posted 07-06-2015 11:56 PM

A Freud Fusion 8 inch combo blade will do 99% of what needs doing, with more friendliness.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View John L's profile

John L

148 posts in 623 days


#14 posted 07-07-2015 03:34 AM

Our resident tablesaw and blade expert, Knotscott….
Has made several postings, that may be of help….
http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/46865#comment-2013785

- DIYaholic

It s kind of a long read, but I d start with this one. ... read through to at least the section that talks about how the blade is only one part of the equation….

- knotscott

Are you planning to add an article about blade sharpening? I’m just about set up with my sharpening jig, have my 8” diamond disc, but just can’t seem to find the time to do my first one. I’ll probably begin with one of my Rip blades, since the teeth are a simple flat top grind, and easier to cut my teeth on.

Even the most expensive blade is not worth all that much if it’s not well honed.

———————————————————————————-


Buy a Forrest Woodworker II (WW10487125) and pitch the rest of your saw blades.

- RogerM

That particular blade is just for crosscutting. What about ripping?

If you’re not going to resharpen them, you can mail them to me. I’ll take them.

-- Tolerance becomes a crime when applied to evil - Thomas Mann

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RogerM

757 posts in 1858 days


#15 posted 07-07-2015 04:53 PM

Works fine for hardwood ripping too.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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