LumberJocks

cedar prices

  • Advertise with us

« back to Coffee Lounge forum

Forum topic by coll98312 posted 10-04-2009 09:20 AM 949 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View coll98312's profile

coll98312

2 posts in 2616 days


10-04-2009 09:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question cedar

My Dad recently bought a piece of property an on it is a fallen cedar that is probably 15t long if not longer and round I’m not sure but I’ll guess 2ft. Bottom part of log sometimes is in the water when tide comes in but is not rotten. He would like to cut it up and possibly sell the wood but has no idea what to ask for it. He was thinking maybe he could trade to get a cord of fir or mixed for firewood. Can you give me a idea to what he should ask for it. I’ve been looking on the internet but only can find prices for shakes, and siding and nothing on kindling or blocks. Please help….


4 replies so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#1 posted 10-04-2009 07:43 PM

Loggers used to cut that stuff up for shake blocks here in western WA.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View LesB's profile

LesB

1235 posts in 2902 days


#2 posted 10-04-2009 08:43 PM

It would help to know exactly what type of cedar it is. In the Pacific Northwest the two dominant cedars are Western Red Cedar and Incense Cedar (aka pencil wood). Both are soft wood. Neither make very good fire wood; especially in wood stoves or any situation where you might dampen the fire. They will cook off a lot of oil that will form creosote in the chimney. It also does not produce much heat. Great campfire wood because they crackle and pop a lot as it burns and it is also good kindling to start fires. I have given away about 5+ cords of Incense cedar it because I don’t want to burn it and I couldn’t get the logs out in one piece to haul to a wood mill.
Western Red Cedar makes good decking, siding and shingles. Incense Cedar good for, well, pencils, but can be used for siding. The heart wood of both are fairly rot resistant so they can be used for fencing. If the grain is straight you can split it for fence rails and posts.
Notottoman is right if the tree has been on the ground for a while it will almost certainly have beetles or other rot in the sap wood (light colored area).
I would cut it, split it and sell it for campfire wood.

-- Les B, Oregon

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#3 posted 10-04-2009 11:49 PM

There weren’t enough beetles here in WA to eat it:-)) Back in the 70’s the loggers were shake blocking stuff that had been down for decades. I don’t have any idea why it was left when cut. Probably because it was too big to handle easily and they had enough cedar in more managable logs.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3135 days


#4 posted 10-04-2009 11:51 PM

BTW, cedar is hard to get started. It is deer candy:-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com