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Help with raked and splayed legs for coffee table

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Forum topic by cornelsteyn1 posted 07-03-2015 02:44 PM 976 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


07-03-2015 02:44 PM

Hi fellow LJ’s!

I’ve been a member for a while now but this is my first post! Have always just been prying around for answers and have found LJ as a great source where I normally get what I’m looking for, you guys are awesome!

Anyway, I’m totally stumped with a way to attach raked and splayed legs for coffee tables I’m in the process of making. It will be made from reclaimed Zambezi Teak and the dimensions will be around 700 mm x 1400 mm(27” x 55”) so not very large, but I would like them to be sturdy.

My idea/design is sleek and minimalistic so I don’t want to use aprons, stretchers, rails or through tenons, thus, I have no idea how to proceed or whether if it’s possible at all or if I’m chasing rabbits.

Thanks Lumberjocks!


23 replies so far

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#1 posted 07-03-2015 03:10 PM

Hi, a picture or two would help me and others advise you.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


#2 posted 07-03-2015 04:01 PM

Hi mrjinx, i’ve added some renderings like you requested, thanks!

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#3 posted 07-03-2015 04:13 PM

I think with the legs at an angle, you would have to have something to prevent them from spreading apart. I can think of metal legs welded to “runners”. Or rectangular steel tubing cut at an angle and welded to a plate. You could make the design more sturdy by making the wooden legs straight instead of angled and use ornamental braces to make the legs sturdy.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#4 posted 07-03-2015 04:16 PM

Not sure if that picture uploaded. Here

-- earthartandfoods.com

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jerryminer

528 posts in 905 days


#5 posted 07-03-2015 04:16 PM

Wedged through tenons?

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Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1825 days


#6 posted 07-03-2015 04:21 PM

That kind of arrangement often employs metal brackets, screwed to the underside of the top. When for a chair, the legs are attached with wedged through tenons.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1995 days


#7 posted 07-03-2015 04:24 PM

I’d be a bit concerned about long-term stability with the minimalist approach. But you won’t know unless you try…

About the only way to do it that minimalisticaly is to use a non-through mortise/tenon joint. And for extra strength, use a foxtail wedged M/T. (That is, a non-through wedged M/T).

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


#8 posted 07-03-2015 04:26 PM

mrjinx, good looking entry table nice inlay! Ornamental braces won’t really work with the look I’m hoping for.

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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


#9 posted 07-03-2015 04:27 PM

Clint, any links or pictures of the type of brackets you’re referring to?

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1231 days


#10 posted 07-03-2015 04:38 PM

Looks like this except rectangular.# May have to have a fabrication shop make them for you.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


#11 posted 07-03-2015 04:38 PM

Thanks Mark, those are good points to consider.

My head knows and tells me that the best way would be the way my heart doesn’t want go, aprons and maybe stretchers, but I guess that’s the problem with seeing designs and wanting to imitate!

The top is only a smidgen over 3/4” (well 20mm not 19mm) thick with a 1 1/8” edge to make it look a bit thicker, do you think foxtail wedged tenons would work with a thin top like that?

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jerryminer

528 posts in 905 days


#12 posted 07-03-2015 04:40 PM



Clint, any links or pictures of the type of brackets you re referring to?

- cornelsteyn1

I think he’s referring to these (attached with hanger bolt in the end of the leg):

leg brackets

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cornelsteyn1

9 posts in 818 days


#13 posted 07-03-2015 04:48 PM

jerryminer, I might be wrong but those look like they’re for turned legs? My legs are 3/4” thick and tapered 1 3/4” at the top to 3/4” at the bottom.

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jerryminer

528 posts in 905 days


#14 posted 07-03-2015 05:06 PM

your legs are 3/4×1 3/4 at the top, and 3/4×3/4 at the bottom?

Sounds weak, but could possibly work for a coffee table. I still think wedged through tenons are your best option if you’re committed to that leg design.
Have you considered hair-pin metal legs?

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RogerM

761 posts in 1863 days


#15 posted 07-03-2015 05:11 PM

Been right where you are at before. Generally, I have found that using aprons (3-5 in wide) and cut the ends with a 5,6,or 7 degree miter is among the best and easiest solution. Attach the aprons to the legs by using mortise and tenon joints or use pocket screws. Because the angles are relatively small you don’t have to use compound miter cuts. Below is a maple table using pinned mortise and tenon joints. These aprons were cut at 7 degrees. Hope this helps you out. Send me a message if you would like additional information.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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