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extra long auger bits

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Forum topic by Pendragon1998 posted 07-03-2015 02:55 AM 983 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pendragon1998

74 posts in 1039 days


07-03-2015 02:55 AM

I was in an antique store recently, and I came across a barrel with several extra long auger bits. They look just like the regular ones you would use in a brace, including the diameter of the bit, they just have extra long shanks. I’m not talking about T-handle auger bits. What are they for? Are they worth picking up?


6 replies so far

View Gopher's profile

Gopher

27 posts in 1409 days


#1 posted 07-03-2015 03:02 AM

For drilling extra long holes.
If you need to drill extra long holes they are worth getting.

-- Ted T. Aiken S.C.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1956 days


#2 posted 07-03-2015 12:21 PM

Aren’t those called “ship augers”? I have a couple of newer ones made for a power drill.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Johnny7's profile

Johnny7

208 posts in 554 days


#3 posted 07-03-2015 01:58 PM

Square taper auger bits having the same general appearance and design as the typical Russell Jennings or Irwin bit, but having a length between 12 and 16” are most likely either “electrician’s” or “car” bits (the latter is a reference to railroad cars)

In my experience, ship’s augers are distinguishable from the above by a wholly different pattern (in addition to their greater length).

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Pendragon1998

74 posts in 1039 days


#4 posted 07-03-2015 02:29 PM

The shop was near a former RR town, so that makes sense.

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8092 posts in 1914 days


#5 posted 07-04-2015 09:20 PM

I just picked up a set.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2187 posts in 1488 days


#6 posted 07-05-2015 06:44 AM

Ship’s augers often lack a pilot screw (“barefoot” augers). When drilling a propeller shaft hole through a deadwood timber, a bit with a pilot screw wants to follow the grain.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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