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Forum topic by mattgill4 posted 07-02-2015 03:19 PM 765 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mattgill4

3 posts in 523 days


07-02-2015 03:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table table saw diy new noob new guy help question tablesaw tip

Hello. I am recently getting back into woodworking since high school. Wanting to start out with some key tools I need some help with table saws. I don’t have a ton of money to spend but wanted to get something that would cut accurate, be reliable, and somewhat portable (move around garage). 110v

Complete Projects:
Decorative Shelf
Stripped, Sanded, and Refinished old coffee tables
Garage workbench and storage with cabinets and drawers

Possible Projects:
Storage shelving
Cabinets
Dart board case
Bean Bags Set (cornhole)
Decorative Shelves
General home DIY

I found the Craftsman Evolv 10” Table Saw for $100 and bought it know I could return if needed. My question – is this a sufficient table for what I plan to do? Would a used table off Craigslist be a better option? If so, I will need some help on a decent one that won’t break the bank. I see quite a few of the older craftsman and delta models in the Chicago area, but am not sure what to look for/avoid.

Craigslist ones <$200:


Any help is appreciated!!


11 replies so far

View derrickparks57's profile

derrickparks57

128 posts in 1334 days


#1 posted 07-02-2015 04:00 PM

I actually own the the saw in the first picture, I bought it new in 2005 it has it’s quirks but it’s been a decent saw. To set the fence I measure from the front of the blade as well as the back, I’ve never paid attention to the tape measure on the fence guide, it ain’t right. Last year the motor bearings went out so it was either replace motor ($100) or replace bearings ($5), I changed the bearings. Well it worked great until about a month ago and it’s not cutting square anymore, so it’s time for a new saw for me. But it’s been a good saw, I bought it cause that’s what I could afford.

My dad owns one similar to the one in the 3rd picture, he’s used it reliably for at least 25 years with minor fixes and he upgraded the fence.

I would go with either the 2nd or 3rd depending on condition/price and how they run, and buy a good blade because that will make a world of difference.

-- Derrick, Florida, DP Woodwerks

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#2 posted 07-02-2015 04:05 PM

A full size cast iron saw with a belt drive induction motor has a lot more potential, not to mention more operating space in front of the blade, more torque, and a much quieter motor. Without question, I’d return the Evolv if you can.

The ABCs of Table Saws

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 640 days


#3 posted 07-02-2015 04:14 PM

make sure that the fence will clamp parallel to the blade.

If this is the extent of the projects you want to make you might look into a community workshop also called a MakerSpace. They usually have better quality tools.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

645 posts in 1841 days


#4 posted 07-02-2015 04:25 PM

I would look up how to tune a table saw.

I had a Delta table saw where the cast iron table was warped. Evidently the hi-lo differential was around 1/8”. It took me a long time to figured it out why my cross cuts are messed up. If the table isn’t reasonably flat, the saw is probably not worth messing with (too costly to tune or impossible to tune)! Use a good straight edge and lay it on top of the table at various position and check for light. Though it won’t be perfectly flat, it needs to be within your expectation.

I believe other potential saw problems are more likely to solved by tuning or you have to live with the inconvenience (Ex: fence setting). There just isn’t much you can do to fix a warped table.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

460 posts in 714 days


#5 posted 07-02-2015 04:39 PM

My brother has one that looks a lot like picture 3. It is a nice saw, but he is not crazy about the fence. As Derrick mentioned about his Dad’s saw, they upgraded the fence on theirs.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View toolie's profile

toolie

2023 posts in 2092 days


#6 posted 07-03-2015 03:34 PM

either of the two c-man saws pictured will run circles around the newer c-man. their fences are much maligned, but slap a t2 on them and there’s not much in a hobbyists shop they wont be able to handle.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View mattgill4's profile

mattgill4

3 posts in 523 days


#7 posted 07-03-2015 03:43 PM



either of the two c-man saws pictured will run circles around the newer c-man. their fences are much maligned, but slap a t2 on them and there s not much in a hobbyists shop they wont be able to handle.

- toolie


All three are craftsman but would the one on the top be a good choice? Or should I get the older versions?

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19178 posts in 2138 days


#8 posted 07-03-2015 03:58 PM

Get the older versions…. with the motor hanging off the back.
I would go for the third one, with cast iron wings.
An after market fence and good blade would be necessary.

DEFINATELY read and follow ALL of Knotscott’s advice & link….
He is the resident tablesaw & blade guru!!!

Happy hunting….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#9 posted 07-03-2015 06:54 PM

either of the two c-man saws pictured will run circles around the newer c-man. their fences are much maligned, but slap a t2 on them and there s not much in a hobbyists shop they wont be able to handle.

- toolie

All three are craftsman but would the one on the top be a good choice? Or should I get the older versions?

- mattgill4

The top one is aluminum and plastic, vs cast iron and steel on the bottom two. It also has a loud direct drive universal motor, vs a quiet belt drive induction motor with more torque. The bottom two have considerably more room in front of the blade too, and heavier cast iron surfaces. I’d go for the third one first, or the 2nd one. You’re likely to outgrow the first one pretty quickly…it’d be light, loud, sloppy, and have next to no upgrade potential. The bottom two have tons of upgrade potential, and can be fairly respectable saws right from the start.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View mattgill4's profile

mattgill4

3 posts in 523 days


#10 posted 07-07-2015 04:11 PM

either of the two c-man saws pictured will run circles around the newer c-man. their fences are much maligned, but slap a t2 on them and there s not much in a hobbyists shop they wont be able to handle.

- toolie

All three are craftsman but would the one on the top be a good choice? Or should I get the older versions?

- mattgill4

The top one is aluminum and plastic, vs cast iron and steel on the bottom two. It also has a loud direct drive universal motor, vs a quiet belt drive induction motor with more torque. The bottom two have considerably more room in front of the blade too, and heavier cast iron surfaces. I d go for the third one first, or the 2nd one. You re likely to outgrow the first one pretty quickly…it d be light, loud, sloppy, and have next to no upgrade potential. The bottom two have tons of upgrade potential, and can be fairly respectable saws right from the start.

- knotscott

Thanks for the insight everyone.. Based on budget and proximity I have it down to these two below (pictures and prices). I’m already close to my max budget (got a nicer new blade) and wanted to make sure it was completely necessary for me to upgrade the fence (seem like that is expensive) for it to be usable/good. Also, with the price difference would it be a better idea to spend the extra $ for #2 (looks better from pictures)? When I go to check them out what should I be looking for… flatness of top, straight fence, visually good condition.. well running motor (how would I know?)..other issues?

I have space in the garage but I would only want it laying around when being used.. maybe move it to the basement after a project is complete.. if this is possible? do the wings adjust at all?

#1. Craftsman $100 firm:

#2. Older Craftsman $200 but maybe can get down to $175ish:


I appreciate the help!!
Matt

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#11 posted 07-07-2015 08:36 PM

It’s hard to tell from the pic, but I’m concerned that ”#1. Craftsman $100 firm:” in post #10 is a compact saw that’s not full size….make sure that it does have a direct drive universal motor too. A full size table would be about 27” deep. A belt drive induction motor would be hanging off the back and would run as quiet as a fan motor….a universal motor will scream like a circular saw.

Option #2 is a decent saw at a fair price with lots of upgrade potential down the road.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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