LumberJocks

Veritas honing guide - worth it?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by rwe2156 posted 07-02-2015 01:48 PM 742 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


07-02-2015 01:48 PM

I’ve pretty decent sharpening skills and I don’t use honing guides (except once in a while to re-establish the angle).

I’ve got a couple new, very nice planes and I want to dress the edges with a slight camber.

The last plane iron I tried this on free hand did not give me satisfactory results.
I used the technique of putting extra pressure on the edges when sharpening, but I wasn’t happy with it.
Plus I wonder if this produces a true camber?

I’ve also seen a technique using a figure 8 motion but haven’t tried that yet.
I’ve go a couple old plane irons to practice on.

So I’m looking at the MKII honing guide with the camber roller and wondering if its worth spending the money or should I keep working on my technique?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!


15 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#1 posted 07-02-2015 01:58 PM

I’d say technique since you sharpen freehand already. It’s free. And once you figure it out its figured out. I use my coarse stones and a straight edge and do the side pressure deal.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1146 days


#2 posted 07-02-2015 02:06 PM

I use a plywood guide cut to the camber I want clamped to the iron on a grinder to establish the camber, than once I have it established find that it’s a lot easier to follow it free hand. I saw it on Stumpy Nubs page in the video where he converted a $10 harbor freight plane into a scrub plane.

I have the MKII but I don’t have the camber wheel for it as it always seemed to me it would only be good at putting the same arc as the camber guide on the iron or maybe a bit less if you where careful with control. I use the MKII these days mostly for establishing the original bevel angle than free hand microlevels. It’s not a bad tool but for what I use it for but I probably would not buy it again. But than I have a whole drawer full of sharping gizmos and gadgets I wouldn’t buy again if I knew now what I knew when I bought them. Having a guide to establish a reference bevel angle to hand sharpen against isn’t a bad thing to have I just don’t think it needs to be anything fancy. Just something that is easy to use and repeatable over time. The MKII is very repeatable over time I will give it that but it’s not always the easiest jig in the world to use because you have to careful you tighten the dual screws down at the same time to not skew the clamp bar.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


#3 posted 07-02-2015 03:04 PM

rwe2156 – are you going to convert a plane blade with camber? If so what is the radius you are looking at?

View upchuck's profile

upchuck

540 posts in 1131 days


#4 posted 07-02-2015 03:15 PM


I ve pretty decent sharpening skills and I don t use honing guides (except once in a while to re-establish the angle).

I ve got a couple new, very nice planes and I want to dress the edges with a slight camber.

So I m looking at the MKII honing guide with the camber roller and wondering if its worth spending the money or should I keep working on my technique?

- rwe2156

I don’t know what type of honing guide(s) you are using “once in a while”. But for slight cambers the side clamping type works well for me. This link explains how: http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/camber-with-a-honing-guide
This is a much cheaper choice. I have an older Lee Valley guide but I don’t use it much. It is the least used of the three different guides I have. But once I have a bevel established I use free hand most of the time.
chuck

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

1674 posts in 790 days


#5 posted 07-02-2015 03:33 PM

I have the MKII and have had issues withblades and chisels slipping off angle. I fixed it by gluing a piece of rubber onto the part that clamps the blade which improved the grip, so I’m not too impressed with that feature. Other than that, it does have good repeatable settings and has an optional skew angle guide.

Mostly, though, I use the eclipse style guide except for my scrub plane blade which I do freehand.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#6 posted 07-02-2015 03:44 PM

If you are good with free hand sharpening then I would stick with it. I have never mastered that art so I use a guide that came with my Trend diamond set.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View hhhopks's profile

hhhopks

645 posts in 1843 days


#7 posted 07-02-2015 04:01 PM

My free hand sharpening challenges is to get a nice straight edge to permit wide fine shavings. The camber and wavy edge is often the result of my lack of experience and practices. It seems that a camber edge should be much easier to obtain than a straight edge (free hand). I use a jig to obtain the straight edge and camber the corners slightly afterward. On the few occasions where I intentionally wanted a camber blade, I was able to do by hand fairly easily.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

1674 posts in 790 days


#8 posted 07-02-2015 04:15 PM

For me, the method used depends on what kind of precision is required. For a lot of chopping procedures, a precise bevel angle is unnecessary. Likewise with the scrub plane, it is not a precision instrument. As long as you get it sharp.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#9 posted 07-02-2015 04:16 PM



rwe2156 – are you going to convert a plane blade with camber? If so what is the radius you are looking at?

- JohnChung

Just really looking to ease they corners to avoid plane tracks.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 07-02-2015 04:18 PM


rwe2156 – are you going to convert a plane blade with camber? If so what is the radius you are looking at?

- JohnChung
Its not for a scrub plane.

I’m just looking to ease they corners to avoid plane tracks.

I think I haven’t been aggressive enough probably because they are premium planes and I’m little worried about messing up the blade.

- rwe2156


-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1146 days


#11 posted 07-02-2015 04:32 PM

rwe2156 – are you going to convert a plane blade with camber? If so what is the radius you are looking at?

- JohnChung
Just really looking to ease they corners to avoid plane tracks.

- rwe2156

What grit are you trying to ease the corners on? I can ease the corners on my Stanley’s on the 4000 grit stones with just a little extra pressure on the edges but my Veritas PMV irons won’t. I need to start the process of adding a slight camber at much lower grits with those irons. Also bevel up planes I have found need a lot more camber for the same effect than bevel down planes. Where I can work the camber into the microbevel on my Stanley irons I have to work it into the main bevel on newer steels and bevel up planes.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1540 days


#12 posted 07-02-2015 05:23 PM

I will address 2 methods….. Since you want the result to not product plane tracks.

Rounding the corners.
———————————————-
I will go free hand. Rounding the corner does not need precision. For free hand I will start at one end of the stone. Pulling the iron only during sharpening to round the edges. Start with the iron on one angle and end the pulling stroke to almost square on the blade edge. This should provide the rounded edge you want.

Camber
—————
Easier to plane since not the whole edge is in contact with the wood. There is a slight scallop on the wood itself. Some use it for leveling and dimensioning the board. With a big enough radius it can even be used on a smoother. Does not leave plane tracks but not the main purpose behind it.
http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/camber.html
For the camber preparation you can use a MKII but I will use a belt sander for this purpose. Quicker. A jig is required for this operation. Use a template for shaping out the camber itself.

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#13 posted 07-02-2015 06:25 PM

If you already free hand, I would say before you spend the money on a Veritas guide, I’d suggest a slow speed grinder. A grinder makes making a camber fast and easy, and has many other applications for a shop.

Also, once you’ve sharpened with a hollow grind, you’ll never go to anything else.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#14 posted 07-02-2015 07:45 PM

Richard -

For touching up a blade I usually start no lower than 800 and work thru 1250, 4K and 8K.
I’m doing the corner easing with these grits, too. I think John has nailed it—its my technique.

John – thanks what I’ve been doing is just hitting the corners ala Rob Cosman & Chris Schwarz (just a little more pressure toward the corners). These guys make you think its just a matter of a few strokes during the polishing stage, but I can’t experience that. Figuring I only need a couple thou eased off, I must be doing something wrong.

I originally thought I just wasn’t being aggressive enough but after examining the blade it also appears I am not holding a consistent angle so out toward the corners the blade is not as sharp.

I think I know what you’re describing and I will try your technique.
Thanks.

Don – Don’t want to shell out the $$ for a ss grinder.
Yes, I hollow grind everything.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#15 posted 07-02-2015 08:32 PM

I must have mis read somewhere, sorry ‘bout that. I thought you wanted a camber like you would camber a jack plane. If you’re just trying to ease the edges then I agree you should be able to just rock from one side to another. I typically do about 10 strokes on each side. Try tipping the blade more, you may not be rocking far enough. I slowly lift the opposing side off the stone.

A slow speed grinder at lowes is only a few dollars more than a veritas jig, but if you hollow grind I assume you already have a grinder. Mine is a normal speed grinder as well. It just takes a little more care.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com