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Stanley Plane Identification

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Forum topic by DBordello posted 06-30-2015 10:29 PM 941 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DBordello

132 posts in 688 days


06-30-2015 10:29 PM

I have been doing casual woodworking for about 6 months. I have acquired several power tools, but the plane still scares me. I don’t know how to sharpen it. I don’t know how to set it up. I don’t know how to use it.

I bought a Buck Bros plane and tried to use it on an end-grain cutting board and the result was mostly frustration.

However, I probably need to bite the bullet. Can anybody identify this plane:

https://imgur.com/a/HZd4V

It is $22 at a local thrift store. In general, as a novice woodworker, I try to avoid shoddy tools, which just make the job more difficult. Is this worth picking up as a first plane? I would likely have it professionally sharpened to start.

Thoughts?


23 replies so far

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#1 posted 06-30-2015 10:36 PM

I would buy it. It looks like all the parts are there and nothing is broken. It will clean up nicely.

I think it’s a #5, made 1933 or later. Possibly up to the 50’s but more likely between 1933 and 1941.

It will still need some restoration work and grinding and sharpening.

You can also make the buck bros work. A plane is no great mystery, just a blade and a way to hold it and move it over the wood.

-Paul

View Don W's profile

Don W

17960 posts in 2029 days


#2 posted 06-30-2015 11:22 PM

For the shape the plane is in, its a decent price. I’d say buy it as well. It’s a #5 Jack plane. You’ll need to learn to sharpen it if you don’t already know. Its a well made plane and will make a great user.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#3 posted 07-01-2015 12:03 AM

Depends on how you plan to use planes. Unless you are going to dimension lumber with them, skip the #5. Find a #4 for a 1st plane. I prefer smooth soles, corrugated soles get caught on edges. Here are my thoughts on 1st planes. If you are going to start down the plane path, learn how to sharpen, it’s not rocket science, and blades need sharpened frequently. Here is my honing method. Creating primary bevels can be done many ways.

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1634 days


#4 posted 07-01-2015 12:06 AM

For that price I would buy it. As Don W say it will make a good user. #5 is a good plane for a first plane.
I haven’t had the corragated sole get caught onedges but I angle the plane slightly when i am using it also. Learn how to sharpen it. Ther are plenty of people on here that will help you tune it. enjoy’ You have started on a very slippery slope.
End grain is not really a place to begin learning how to use a plane but if you learn how to do that the rest is easy

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Tim's profile

Tim

3112 posts in 1423 days


#5 posted 07-01-2015 12:14 AM

That’s a good price and even if you end up getting a #4 when you find a good deal on that, this one will get you started now. It was made back when Stanley made very high quality tools. But like OSU said, keep a lookout for a good deal on a #4 too. If you get it, check out DonW’s site above or OSU’s or other blog pages here for how to restore and tune it to good working condition.

I also agree learning to sharpen isn’t that hard. Pick a method and stick with it until you get good at it. Be it sandpaper on glass or granite, water stones, oil stones, or diamond stones, they all can work well, it’s just a matter of preference and money outlay. Starting with a sharpening jig makes it easier to learn what sharp is right away, but eventually learning to sharpen freehand makes it a little faster each time you sharpen (not a huge deal) and also helps make it easier to sharpen odd sizes and blades that don’t fit in the sharpening jig.

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

225 posts in 637 days


#6 posted 07-01-2015 12:38 AM

I agree. It’s a good plane at a good price. I also agree. It’s a slippery slope. You’ll start buying up every decent plane you find.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View Luthierman's profile

Luthierman

157 posts in 548 days


#7 posted 07-01-2015 12:41 AM

It s a slippery slope. You ll start buying up every decent plane you find.

- onoitsmatt

Good grief, tell me about it. Getting ready to pull the trigger on a Lie Nielsen no 2. Those aren’t cheap. I friggin love planes. Especially those old Stanley’s.

-- Jesse, West Lafayette, Indiana

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 688 days


#8 posted 07-01-2015 02:03 AM

Thank you everybody for your advice. I think I can summarize:

1. This isn’t the best starter plane
2. Buy this plane, because planes are awesome.

Got it. I’ll pick it up tomorrow.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3112 posts in 1423 days


#9 posted 07-01-2015 02:16 AM

I for one think a #5 is a great place to start. Not everybody does though and that’s fine. Hope no one snipes it from you before you get it. I happen to use my #5’s more because I have more of them and I leave one with lots of camber and one set up more like a smoothing plane and I like how it helps me flatten boards quickly. Then I leave the #4 with a tighter mouth and less reveal from the chip breaker.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14555 posts in 2144 days


#10 posted 07-01-2015 02:27 AM

Need to find a place like this…

I didn’t have the cash for this one table full…....

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2099 days


#11 posted 07-01-2015 02:47 AM

I should qualify my original comment.

I would buy it… if I didn’t already have 5 of them. ;-0 Try offering them $15 first, but pay the asking price if they won’t budge. That one looks to have very little rust, which is worth a bit more – saves you some time cleaning it up.

(If you buy it, eventually, you’ll likely have 5 of them too!)

Also, as somebody said, planing end grain is very difficult with any plane. That may not be the first thing to do learning how to plane. For end grain, it’s especially important that the plane be razer sharp and that you take a very very light cut. Think in terms of a few (2 or 3) thousanths of an inch to start with. It’s slow going.

View Tugboater78's profile

Tugboater78

2446 posts in 1653 days


#12 posted 07-01-2015 03:32 AM

I started with a #5..

That one is worth the bills, aolid user/learning to tune plane

I mostly use my first #5 ( was my grandpas) cleaned it up and supertuned it. Now use my 5.5s x2 for most work. Gramps #5 (course) t11 #5.5 (medium/jointing) t12 #5.5 (fine/initial smoothing) finish off with my t9 #4.5. Learnd mainly from guys on here but i also bought C shwarz videos an watched them.

Slippery slope:

-- "....put that handsaw to work and make it earn its keep. - summerfi" <==< JuStiN >==>=->

View DBordello's profile

DBordello

132 posts in 688 days


#13 posted 07-01-2015 03:33 PM

Thank you everybody for the good advice. I am going to pick it up today.

Do you recommend I have it professionally sharpened to start, or jump right in and learn how to maintain it? Without breaking the bank, what do I need to get this thing finely tuned?

View JayT's profile

JayT

4773 posts in 1672 days


#14 posted 07-01-2015 03:42 PM


Do you recommend I have it professionally sharpened to start, or jump right in and learn how to maintain it? Without breaking the bank, what do I need to get this thing finely tuned?

- DBordello

Dive right it and learn to sharpen it yourself. At some point you are going to have to learn anyways and this is as low a risk place to start as you can get. There’s not a lot you can screw up, if something goes wrong, you just resharpen.

You’ll probably find there isn’t much tuning to do, once you get it sharp. Clean up everything, give it a coat of wax or light oil to prevent rust and start using it. Only then, if you start to run into issues, will you need to look into more tuning.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14555 posts in 2144 days


#15 posted 07-01-2015 03:44 PM

Something as flat as you can find, like the cut-out from a sink install(scrapped) or a 12×12” floor tile. A can of spray adhesive to attach a few sheets of sandpaper to the flat surface. (Double stick tape will also work) and then some grits of sandpaper. Small square of 100, 220. Then a variety pack of wet&dry paper. 1000,1500,2000, and 2500 grits. Windex or 3in1 oil to lube the wet paper.

Then, go look up a Paul Sellers video on how he does this. The one with the Aldi Chisels shows a lot more.

That’s about all you need to start.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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