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Looking at picking up a Grizzly G1022

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Forum topic by mingus2112 posted 06-30-2015 02:35 AM 2150 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


06-30-2015 02:35 AM

Hi Guys,

Long time lurker, first time (I THINK) poster. Casually looking at upgrading my craftsman table saw (137.218020) and came across a Grizzly G1022 on craigslist. I say “casually” because budget is a big deal here. I’m not a heavy woodworker, just a homeowner who likes to do things himself. My biggest complaints about the craftsman is that it’s light, flimsy and the table is tiny. It’s also hard to keep the plastic fence straight when getting ready to cut. I’m just looking for something that’s a bit more heavy duty, more metal parts and with a bigger table.

This G1022 could be about 20 years old – I didn’t think to look at the date on the motor. It’s a G1022 model, with no other model markings. Seems to be a cast iron table with webbed iron extensions. The table is relatively flat, although the extensions are a little bit higher (maybe 1/16th”?) than the table. Maybe the extensions could be adjusted, not sure. When checking with my straight edge, I could get my .016 feeler gauge under it at some points, but my straight edge was a bit too big to be sure that it was anything other than the extensions causing the gap. I should have brought a smaller straight edge. Other than that, it probably needs a new belt, there are a few dings in it, top is rusty (but not pitted – i’m sure I could clean it up. I have a lot of experience with cast iron pans, so I know surface rust when I see it) and the wheel to angle the blade is a little, uh “wonky.” It seems to angle the blade with no issues, but it was probably hit at some point and is a little bent – it doesn’t turn nice and smooth. The wheel to raise/lower the blade turned smooth with no issues.

I ran it and it ran pretty well – only a little vibration, which i’m almost sure was due to the old belt on it. It’s been sitting in the garage (detached from the house) for a lot of years and the guy said it hasn’t been used for a few years. He said his father “made cabinets” with it (never said he was a “cabinet maker,” though) and that they most recently made large tables on it for making wine. (not sure why he thought that was so relevant, but he kept saying that)

I offered him $100 and he countered with $150. I countered with $125 (before I went to see the saw) and he accepted. After checking out the saw, I’m on the fence. I’ll mostly be ripping plywood or boards to make drawers, shelves and things like that. Nothing furniture grade.

So 1) How big a deal are the shortcomings 2) even with those shortcomings, is it worth $125? I can’t see myself spending more than that even in the future, so how does it compare to whatever else I can get in that range?

-J




43 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 06-30-2015 02:44 AM

I guess I’m seeing a fence in the one picture. If it has the fence I would say it is definitely worth 125 and is an improvement over the craftsman. The wings should be easily adjusted. It should have a 1 1/2 horse motor that is a huge improvement over the craftsman universal motor. I would say you are right about the belt. After sitting for a while mine will shake a bit until the belt warms up and loses the memory bends. It may not even need a new belt, just to be run for a good while.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#2 posted 06-30-2015 02:50 AM

Thanks for the reply. Yeah, the fence was put on upside down when I got there. The guy was like “yeah, I guess you can flip that around.” Definitely a 1.5HP motor.

Now here’s an interesting thing that came up – a G1023 just came up for sale. No pictures and I can’t even tell how far the guy is from me (i’ve asked). Asking $200OBO. If I could get the 1023 for close to my budget AND it’s in good shape, how much better of a machine am I looking at? He also has some other gear i’m interested in, so I’m thinking I could work a pretty good deal – better than $200. Then again, for $200, maybe it was in a flood or a house fire – doesn’t seem plausible that a good-condition cabinet saw is going for $200OBO.

-J

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#3 posted 06-30-2015 02:55 AM

So 1) How big a deal are the shortcomings 2) even with those shortcomings, is it worth $125?

1) What shortcomings?? A wonky hand wheel? Not a real biggie as far as I can tell.
2) Yes

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#4 posted 06-30-2015 03:02 AM

I will point out that the 1022 is right tilt, which is not a big deal. It just means if you want to cut smallish pieces at an angle you will need to do it with the fence in the left side of the blade. I thought it looked like the fence was upside down, but I couldn’t figure out how.
For the woodworking you described, the 1022 should me more than you’d need. With the 1022 you’ll get more power, but I’m not sure you need that. The 1023 is likely much older.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#5 posted 06-30-2015 04:53 AM

I may have answered my own question here about the 1022 vs the 1023. I really like the idea of the improved dust collection of the 1023. All things equal (condition, price), the 1023 seems like the only obvious choice – hands down. . .until you get to the weight. . .

The 1023 is a full 200lbs heavier than the 1022. Assuming I manage to get it into the basement without killing myself and/or a friend, i’d love the 1023. But it’s going in my basement. The stairs insidethe house are narrow with a tight turn at the bottom and the stairs from outside are steep and deep.

How much can I dismantle either one of these saws for transportation? No matter which one I get (assuming it’s working well), it will probably outlive my stay in this house. That means I’ll have to move it again. I’ve already moved my grandfather’s 60 year old Walker Turner drill press twice (once from my grandfather’s house to my last house and then again when we bought this house). Both times I said it would be the last time I moved it and I’m pretty sure the last time is responsible for my buddy’s severe back problems!

-J

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1492 days


#6 posted 06-30-2015 05:12 AM

That fence, with the pipe rails, is a clone of the Delta/Rockwell (both contractor and Unisaw), and if it were me, I’d figure on changing that out for a T-square style fence as one of my first improvements. I truly despise those OEM fences.

Yes, the webbed iron extensions can be adjusted. But I can’t get within 6 feet of one of those without pinching my fingers when I move the fence or miter gauge. By the way, that 1.5 hp motor probably can be rewired to run off 220, if you have it (a very easy task). You’ll find a real improvement in performance. The 1023 is of course a 220 volt machine.

Don’t let the weight of the saw stymie you. Hire 4 or 5 local teenagers to do the heavy lifting for you. They’ll scramble to outdo each other in macho strength displays. On the other hand, I’ve moved heavy loads down basement stairs by hooking up a comealong to a handy anchor point, and skidding it down planks laid on the stairs. Did the same thing in reverse.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#7 posted 06-30-2015 01:19 PM

Upgrading the fence is a future option, but I’m not at a point right now where i’d notice the difference. As for hiring local kids to bring it in the basement? I’d rather carefully get it down there with a buddy who I know isn’t going to ruin it or my house! I can take the Stand, motor and wings off for sure. That would make it easier. Just not sure the 1023 is as easy to take apart.

The guy with the 1023 hasn’t gotten back to me yet, so who knows. I’m leaning more and more towards the 1022. Any other 1022 owners want to chime in with experience? Good/bad? Some photos of your saws set up?

-J

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 643 days


#8 posted 06-30-2015 01:33 PM

On the questioning of lightening the load:

In either case you should be able to remove the fence, fence rail(s), and table extensions.

A true cabinet saw will have the trunnion mounted to the frame so you could remove the saw’s table.

A contractor’s type saw has the trunnion mounted to the saw’s table. This means you can’t remove the table top. Also saw alignment is harder on this type.

To me an old saw in good shape is the best shape. It seems that older items were just made better.

I have had a right tip saw and some cuts are risky / unsafe. I think the G1023 is left tilt and that would be a clear deciding factor for me. Of course I do a lot of woodworking.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#9 posted 06-30-2015 01:49 PM


To me an old saw in good shape is the best shape. It seems that older items were just made better.

That’s why I’m looking at used. Other than some VERY old craftsman and smaller (and older) Deltas, I’m not seeing anything even TWICE this price. To start getting into this type of saw (The 1022) from brands like Delta, Jet, etc, you are looking at $400+. Not a ridiculous amount for a saw, obviously, but still more than i’m going to spend.

As for new saws, it just doesn’t appeal to me. I only see jobsite saws around for anything less than $1000 and, although the QUALITY would be upgraded, I don’t see it being a feature upgrade from what I have already.

I’m already thinking of space utilization and I think that, by adding a larger saw like the 1022 (or 1023 if it ends up being amazing), I can actually regain some more space. Assuming I can get that cast iron table nice and flat, I could use a piece of 1/2” plywood with a lip around it to sit on top of it (with the blade down) protecting it and creating a workspace to use for small things. (like electronics – nothing heavy that would damage the saw!)

-James

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#10 posted 06-30-2015 02:24 PM

$125 looks to be a good deal if the fence is included. The fence isn’t great, but it has a strong motor and the classic Taiwanese contractor saw design. With a good blade and good setup, it should perform well.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#11 posted 06-30-2015 02:54 PM

Yep – fence is included. It was just used wrong. Not sure why he had it upside down.

I’ll probably end up with it. I wouldn’t normally obsess over something that’s only $125, but it’s (physically) a HUGE purchase. I’m not in the business of reselling things, (ask my wife about the THREE 24 channel Audio Mixing consoles I have in the garage) so this will either stay with me until the end or be given away to a friend or family member if I ever upgrade.

So now comes the restoration. While I have it all apart, what should I be cleaning up, lubricating, etc? I’ll want to clean the top (and wax it, i guess?). How about the fence? Any maintenance there? Motor? I’m probably going to put it back together on lockable casters so I can move it around the tiny shop if I have to.

-J

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#12 posted 06-30-2015 02:55 PM

And also dust collection. . .any tips?

View webwood's profile

webwood

626 posts in 2717 days


#13 posted 06-30-2015 04:38 PM

I bought the “z” series of this saw 20 some years ago . 2hp, upgrade shopfox fence. it has handled everything I’ve thrown at it. Dust hood fits underneath.

-- -erik & christy-

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mingus2112

40 posts in 1310 days


#14 posted 06-30-2015 06:31 PM

Wow – you bought the Z series 20 years ago? I wonder how old this one is. I was skeptical when he said it was the G1022 and said that there was no additional model information on it, but there definitely wasn’t any extension like Z. So maybe it’s even older than yours. When did they come out with the G1022?

-J


I bought the “z” series of this saw 20 some years ago . 2hp, upgrade shopfox fence. it has handled everything I ve thrown at it. Dust hood fits underneath.

- webwood


View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4244 posts in 1666 days


#15 posted 06-30-2015 06:40 PM

I’ll probably end up with it.

Might not if you keep going back and forth on it… OWWM rule #5 might just bite you (which is probably what happened to the 1023). It should already be sitting in your basement… until then, you are just picking your peaches before they are all good and fuzzed up (old Andy Taylor reference :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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