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Table Saw question - restore old or get new?

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Forum topic by bues0022 posted 10-01-2009 03:03 AM 5374 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


10-01-2009 03:03 AM

I’m a relative novice when it comes to woodworking. I’ve done a few projects over the course of the past few years at my godfather’s house. I’ve recently begun purchasing my own equipment since I’ve moved out of state. A few weeks ago I picked up an old Craftsman TS for $20 at a garage sale (model number 113.27520). It’s belt drive, and has cast wings (is that the right term?). However, upon closer inspection the fence is worthless. So I’m at a bit of a crossroads. Do I buy a new fence or make one somehow, or sell this saw and buy a new (to me – i.e. used) saw. I’m going to use this just for small projects, and I want to spend money as efficiently as possible. Is it better to get a new fence or buy new? My biggest complaint with my godfather’s saw – also craftsman – is I have to triple measure each cut. The fence tape measure is worthless, and I have to check the front and back of the blade to make sure the fence is parallel to the blade.

Aside from this question above, are their other things that are really nice to have that I should be looking to put on this saw/look for? I’ve seen things like a riving blade, anti-kickback guard, zero clearance blade things. All I’ve used is a bare-bones saw, so I don’t know what I’m missing, or even if I need these gadgets.

Finally, the small table the saw sits on is kinda rickety. I could easily make a new one, but this would be a moot point if I get a new saw potentially, but it’s just another factor rattling around in my head.

Thanks for the help everyone. I’m in a bit over my head so hopefully you can help me weed through the crap and figure it all out.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN


30 replies so far

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#1 posted 10-01-2009 03:40 AM

Browse through Amazon or your favorite Woodworking supplier to find a good fence for not a lot of money (comparatively speaking). The Delta T2, and Shop Fox Classic are both very popular options.

While riving knives are a very good thing, a decent splitter can do an excellent job as well. I don’t know if it is available for your model, but you might look into adding a BORK (Bolt On Ripping Knife) which is essentially a bolt on riving knife upgrade for a not RK equipped saw…

Zero Clearance throat plates can be made out of appropriate thickness materials a drill, and a router…. There are lots of videos on YouTube on how to do that…. Just use your stock throat plate as a template… And new saws don’t come with them either…

If you are any good at metal fabrication, Lee Styron has a pattern for a splitter for that saw… It’s designed to work with his Shark Guard design, for which you can get a radically improved guard, anti kickback pawls, etc…

So long story short, If I had that saw, and things like the cast iron, the motor, and the arbor were good, I would try to restore it. That is the kind of machine you can be proud to have in your shop for another 50 years!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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AaronK

1397 posts in 2131 days


#2 posted 10-01-2009 04:19 AM

for that price, and that saw, i’d say restore it. that is a nice large saw (very nice – what a cool “vintag” machine design!). the process of refurb will be enriching, and probably pretty easy. that fence looks kind of short anyway, so getting a new one wouldn’t have been out of the question to begin wit. also, have you tried taking a good look at the fence itself? there could be something wrong, or a part missing, that’s making it so far out of alignment.

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Neodogg

94 posts in 2094 days


#3 posted 10-01-2009 05:56 AM

hey, my vote would be to restore it. Did you look for the manual, maybe all you have to do is tune up the fence? I restored my g-pa’s ‘54 craftmans TS:
http://lumberjocks.com/Neodogg/blog/8851

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!

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knotscott

5484 posts in 2043 days


#4 posted 10-01-2009 01:01 PM

From your description it sounds like it’s not quite full size? A standard full size contractor saw is 27” deep. If this one is not, it might still be worth upgrading a little, but you’ll still be dealing with a smaller table. You can add outfeed tables to any say (recommended), but increasing the operating space in front of the blade gets tricky. Table size may be a consideration for a fence upgrade. If it’s full size, no worries.

A good blade is always a good investment on any saw. Does it take 10” blades? (Amazon has a good selection of smaller size blades from Freud, Forrest, & CMT). A custom ZCI and a splitter are good investments. Microjig makes the “MJ splitter” that fits just about any saw, but will double the cost of your saw ;).

If the miter slots are standard size, a decent miter gauge is always worth having. The Incra V27 is one of the better values. You can make a cutoff and/or miter sled for your saw too…regardless of the size of the miter slots.

Get it aligned well, and it should serve you nicely!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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UnionLabel

660 posts in 1867 days


#5 posted 10-01-2009 02:33 PM

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2603/3971720900_c2607d5a13.jpg
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2548/3971721264_75d31de100.jpg
This saw is just a little older than yours, restored, up graded fence, motor, and zero clearance inserts. The table top is 24”W X 27”D with a wing on each side 12”W. Had to drill and tap the 1” cast iron to to attach the 7’ Shop Fox fence rails. Upgraded to a 2 hp Leesom motor with machined pulleys and link belt. This was my grandfathers shop saw and it weighed a ton before the mods, now I have it on rollers and a reinforced stand so I can get it in position. When I retired, we down sized our house, which meant I lost my shop. We moved to a smaller home, no room for an outbuilding shop, so I am learning how to share a garage. I have other restored equipment. I think the older stuff is just as good as some of the new stuff (not all of it), if not better(in some cases).

A good source for info and parts is Old Wood Working Machines.org, if you restore.

-- Methods are many,Principles are few.Methods change often,Principles never do.

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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


#6 posted 10-01-2009 03:05 PM

WOW! I really wasn’t prepared for the overwhelming response to restore this saw. After seeing some of the restored saws you guys posted it gives me hope for what this saw could look like. I guess I’m going to start sanding today!

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2966 days


#7 posted 10-01-2009 03:12 PM

You got a great buy, I’d restore it.

After you’ve gotten into woodworking longer, you’ll no more about what you need in the line of what saw you may want.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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Bothus

428 posts in 1843 days


#8 posted 10-01-2009 03:47 PM

I am sure you will enjoy restoring that saw. Please keep us in the loop as much as possible. We look forward to seeing your progress.

As you have discovered, if you need help we are only a posting away.

;;
J

-- Jerry Boshear, Professional Kitchen Designer, amature woodworker.

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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


#9 posted 10-01-2009 08:54 PM

I started the deconstruction today on the oldie-but-goodie. Here’s my progress so far(see below) [URL=http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2003335800085114583cSuXek][/URL](Table saw in parts in my garage) I’m off to go find a sand blaster to take care of the old paint.

[URL=http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2003335800085114583cSuXek][IMG]http://inlinethumb52.webshots.com/45299/2003335800085114583S600x600Q85.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

http://inlinethumb52.webshots.com/45299/2003335800085114583S600x600Q85.jpg

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


#10 posted 10-02-2009 12:18 AM

I’m looking for a little help locating something on here. I saw a post last night but now can’t find it again. There was someone who had an old Craftsman TS like mine that had built an entire cabinet around it. The saw loomed restored also. Any ideas?

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


#11 posted 10-02-2009 01:21 AM

table saw dismantled

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2966 days


#12 posted 10-02-2009 05:32 AM

Could this be it?

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1003 posts in 2153 days


#13 posted 10-02-2009 05:54 AM

It looks like a consensus. Your gonna have to restore it now, or face the wrath (haha). Like Union Lable said Old Wood Working Machines (OWWM.com) is a great source of information and parts. Here’s a pic of your model, restored.

http://www.owwm.com/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=6137

I have the shop fox fence on a grizzly machine and it’s dead on, and stable. It’s cheap enough you could resell it if you find an original fence.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

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Neodogg

94 posts in 2094 days


#14 posted 10-02-2009 06:14 AM

baby steps so far…keep us posted!

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!

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bues0022

216 posts in 1827 days


#15 posted 10-02-2009 02:29 PM

Dick, & Barb Cain – that’s exactly what I was looking for. For now all I’m going to do is restore the actual saw itself. As you can see in the picture above, it’s all taken apart and ready to have the paint removed. I was thinking of sandblasting or using a wire wheel. I’d prefer sandblasting, but can’t find anyone near me that has one for me to use, and I’d like do things myself as much as possible. As this is my first restoration project (and first major piece of woodworking equipment) if anyone has suggestions for me along the way I’m all ears – especially if it’s something that I’ll have to do now to prepare for something later.

-- Ryan -- Maple Grove, MN

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