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How do I laminate 2 pressure treated 2x8s together?

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Forum topic by WoodNSawdust posted 06-29-2015 08:58 PM 1375 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


06-29-2015 08:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: pressure treated lumber glue epoxy j-b weld laminate wood

When the extension to my shop was built a pressure treated (pt) 2×8 was used as the bottom plate against the concrete slab. This piece extends across the doorway as a sill. To make a small ramp for moving heavy items into the shop I want to add an additional pt 2×6 and cut a slop in the two pieces.

I have cut a slope in the existing 2×8 and cut a new pt 2×6 with a slope to form the ramp.

My question is how do I glue an 4+ year old pt wood to a new pt wood that still feels damp? Since this is a doorway there is the possibility that the wood will be rained on. I have considered TightBond III, Epoxy, and J-B Weld. Suggestions?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith


14 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#1 posted 06-29-2015 09:20 PM

Polyurethane glue, such as Gorilla Glue. It needs moisture to activate, so the still wet new stuff won’t be an issue. It’s also waterproof once dry. Just make sure you have good mating surfaces and clamp the pieces together firmly. (Screwed together in this instance, most likely, will work fine, too)

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Andre's profile

Andre

1021 posts in 1267 days


#2 posted 06-29-2015 09:26 PM

PL400, Air Nailer or screws.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1468 days


#3 posted 06-29-2015 09:49 PM

Is the new 2X6 addition going on INSIDE the doorway? or outside? If inside, you might be able to just screw it to the floor, butting it up against the existing 2X8.

If outside, I’d also just butt it against the 2X8 and secure it to the concrete with construction adhesive. I have had very good luck with this product.
.
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-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#4 posted 06-29-2015 09:52 PM

Construction adhesive.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#5 posted 06-29-2015 10:03 PM



Is the new 2X6 addition going on INSIDE the doorway? or outside? If inside, you might be able to just screw it to the floor, butting it up against the existing 2X8.

- JoeinGa

Inside, but with the door open rain can come in.

Think of using two 2x to forma 4x (thick) with a slope cut into it. From 1/8 inch above the concrete sloping up to a full 3 inch thick.

I want some kind of glue because the edge is so thin.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1468 days


#6 posted 06-29-2015 10:06 PM

I’d use the adhesive (shown above) and glue it to the floor. Once the adhesive sets, it WONT let the boards separate. You can also use the same adhesive to glue wood-to-wood. That stuff is STRONG !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 548 days


#7 posted 06-29-2015 10:46 PM

PL Premium. I’ve used that to glue pt to concrete still so stuck together it’s like the wood grew out of the concrete.

-- Learn Relentlessly

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 683 days


#8 posted 06-29-2015 10:47 PM

PT doesn’t care for glue up much, I’d suggest PL 400 or 200 under and between the 2 pieces then I’d run concrete lags into the floor to hold them down.

-- I meant to do that!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#9 posted 06-30-2015 11:56 AM

I wouldn’t glue it just Tapcon screw into concrete floor.

I’m curious why you have a plate running across a doorway?
What is it holding up?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#10 posted 06-30-2015 12:04 PM

I’d cut a piece of half inch plywood the width of the door and about 3 or 4 feet long and just place that down when you need to dolly something in. Much smoother approach angle that way.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#11 posted 06-30-2015 12:31 PM

I agree with the construction adhesive. Really strong stuff and should last as long as the PT. There’s a few recommendations above for Loctite’s PL series of construction adhesive.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 637 days


#12 posted 06-30-2015 01:19 PM

Thanks all! I will go with the Loctite PT construction adhesive.

dhazelton: I have used the plywood ramp for several years. It has always been problematic. As I prepare to add several multi-hundred pound tools (multi-thousand dollar) I want something better. I worry about a tool balanced on a jury rigged dolly going up a jury rigged ramp.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2396 days


#13 posted 06-30-2015 01:43 PM

A picture would help but I’m wondering why you have a plate running across a doorway in the first place?

Builders usually do that to keep the wall on both sides of the door square when they are building it (typically on the floor and then raised up). After the wall is raised they cut the plate out. I’ve done it myself and you may be able to do that here.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 683 days


#14 posted 06-30-2015 06:53 PM

I’ve framed over concrete slabs many times and left the sill in place because the owner intended on using an old wooden threshold door, placing the door on a PT sill protects the threshold from water settling under it and rot. It also protects the lead or copper pan flashing from concrete abrasion for a much longer period than if it was in direct contact.

-- I meant to do that!

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