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Rebuilding Craftsman 113

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Forum topic by nogeel posted 06-29-2015 04:12 AM 2069 views 1 time favorited 63 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nogeel

68 posts in 532 days


06-29-2015 04:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman table saw rebuild 113

I am in the process of attempting to rebuild and clean a craftsman 113 that has been in a field for about 10 years that my Dad gave me. I have everything, but the saw guard and and miter gauge. Very rusted, but insides seem to work fine except that the arbor bearing needs to be replaced. I figured I would start a post to get advice and document the progress for other people. I am new to woodworking and doing this much mechanical stuff (outside of basic car maintenance). I’ll be glad for any tips or advice during this process. A starting picture is at the bottom.

My current plan is to :
A) tear it completely down and remove as much rust as possible.
B) Paint everything that is not the table top or a bearing part.
C) Replace O-rings and Lubricate
D) Reassemble

I don’t mind putting a little bit of money into getting this up and running (particularly since it was free) and then actually upgrading it.

Based on the other posts here on lumber jocks here are my current plans upgrades the rebuild:

1) Get PALS for it. For $20 this sounds indespensible based on the other post.
2) New arbor bearing.
3) Get a v-link belt and possible better pulleys. Thoughts? Are these worth it?
4) Where can I find an after market blade guard? The shark blade guard is really pricey and since I have a garden shed shop without dust collection. Ebay ones are pricey too and seem to show they are 30+ years old. What are my options?
5) Mircrojig MJ Splitter Pro
6) Make a Zero Clearance Insert for it
7) New Blade

The Eventually list if I get it up and running:
1) New Fence (either build or buy)
2) Upgrade the motor to a 2HP +
3) Back some of the cast iron extension for it
4) Build a work station for it.
5) Cheap Incra Mitre

My first problem is the set screw on the blade lift handle is rusted in there. It is preventing me from being able to take off the box. I have tried Seafoam penetrating oil multiple times, tapping with a punch and using penetration on, and broke a 1/8 hex socket off in there (which part it is still in there. I have not tried head because of the plastic handle. I have not tried drilling it out yet, but the problem is I have what seems to be harder steel in there from the socket. Any ideas of what to try next?

-- Jeff, Tennessee


63 replies so far

View RobinDobbie's profile

RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1198 days


#1 posted 06-29-2015 08:05 AM

1) PALS sounds like it would be neat, but it’s something you’ll use once or twice every couple years, and it’ll save you maybe 10-20 minutes.

2) New arbor bearings are a good idea. Make sure the bearings you get end in ZZ. If you need, most auto shops will lend you a gear puller to get the old bearings off. Or you could just take the arbor there and they’d be likely to help if it’s not a weekend.

3) Some are of the opinion that v-belts that are new are quieter and smoother than link belts. Obviously a link belt will be better than what’s on there now. I think you’re fine with either, but I’d just stick with a nice new V, if it were me.

5) Splitters are pretty easy to make yourself. If you’re already making your own zero-clearance, why not go all the way?

6) If you make your own zero-clearance, be sure to seal it well on the end-grain(even manufactured wood like MDF or melamine)with joint compound or spackle or something pore-sealing, then polyurethane all over. My favorite material is melamine, but on an old craftsman that has an exceptionally thin mounting depth, you might use some laminate flooring or hardboard, then glue on a thicker piece below for rigidity. Youtube has a few videos on how to do it. Izzy Swan just made a thin plate out of PVC pipe that he melted and flattened!

7) 40-tooth Irwin Marples is what’s in my crosscut saw, and I have a 40-tooth 7-1/4” Freud Diablo in my ripping saw. If I was going to rip thicker stuff than 1”, I’d get a 24-tooth(and maybe 10” for thicker than 1.75”), but so far the 40 circular saw blade has been sweet and smooth.

The Eventually list if I get it up and running:
1) Just buy a Delta T2 and be done with it.

2) You’ll get the added bonus of efficiency with a new motor. Those old craftsmen motors drink like 8-9 amps just idling. If possible, get the motor on 220.

4) Building a work station for it will eliminate the need for cast iron extensions, if it’s done right.

5) I have a couple 1000HDs and they’re nice. Not really the indispensable things I thought they’d be. I’d make one, and get an angle finder. Hell of a lot cheaper. I’d make the bar out of Rockler aluminum miter bar with the adjustment screws. Forget wood. Just forget wood for any kind of miter slot stuff. Unless you have a climate controlled shop with a temperature and humidity that never ever fluctuates, never use wood for miter bars/runners.

Maybe some liquid wrench on the rusted handle? Worse comes to worse just cut it off and get a metal hand wheel.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4222 posts in 1662 days


#2 posted 06-29-2015 09:17 AM


[...]
2) New arbor bearings are a good idea. Make sure the bearings you get end in ZZ. If you need, most auto shops will lend you a gear puller to get the old bearings off. Or you could just take the arbor there and they d be likely to help if it s not a weekend.
[...]
- RobinDobbie

Would recommend sealed, not shielded (ZZ) bearings for the arbor – and pretty much anything else on that machine that might need bearings such as the motor. Better at keeping crap out.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14571 posts in 2146 days


#3 posted 06-29-2015 01:11 PM

And, maybe some day you will have something like this?

I combined two saws to make one that runs

No, that is a Craftsman motor

The extra wings went to the right side

The main part of this saw has had one owner…me. Bought it new from sears. One year, the trunion cracked, and locked up. Construction Company I was working for at the time was selling their old Craftsman saw…$25. Got a new trunion assembly, a dual belt motor, and the extra wings. Never did find replacement wheels…..used the smallest pair of Visegrips I had on the height adjuster shaft. It was even easier to spin that that too small wheel. Currently in storage, as there isn’t the room in my Dungeon Shop….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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WhoMe

1465 posts in 2706 days


#4 posted 06-29-2015 01:36 PM

One thing I didn’t see on the list is a good power switch. Whatever you get, make sure it has the paddle to shut it off. Most modern saws have them and I makes it much easier to turn it off versus looking for the off button. If you stick with a 120v motor with less than 15 amp draw, Rockler has a pretty good one that they use on their router tables.
I found on my old 113 that the link belt worked better than a v belt reducing vibration but try the v belt first, it is less expensive.
Also, I second the delta T2 fence, it was the best upgrade I made to my saw.

-- I'm not clumsy.. It's just the floor hates me, the tables and chairs are bullies, the wall gets in the way AAANNNDDD table saws BITE my fingers!!!.. - Mike -

View RobinDobbie's profile

RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1198 days


#5 posted 06-29-2015 03:05 PM



Would recommend sealed, not shielded (ZZ) bearings for the arbor – and pretty much anything else on that machine that might need bearings such as the motor. Better at keeping crap out.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

A lot of saws come with ZZ bearings from the factory, so it’s my opinion that MrUnix is just nitpicking. Unless the saw is going to spend another 10 years in a field, rubber seals probably aren’t necessary. They often add a bit of friction(not much, but a little). Weaker motors on long extension cords might have more difficulty starting up(my experience). The important thing is to get bearings with a cover on both sides. A bearing with a single Z after the number may not have a cover on both sides. If bearings get ordered, just be sure you’re getting bearings that don’t have a completely open side.

View JakeTheEngineer's profile

JakeTheEngineer

6 posts in 558 days


#6 posted 06-29-2015 03:27 PM

I’m just finishing up doing the exact same thing. Finally got mine reassembled except the wings and mounting the motor. My lift/tilt handles were the same as yours and I had the same problem with my blade tilt handle set screw. The blade lift handle was missing on mine I so replaced them with the 6” handwheels from Grizzly. It was a big improvement over the ones that come on it and I’d recommend that. I ended up drilling out the old set screw and got it out without damaging the rod.

View oldretiredjim's profile

oldretiredjim

203 posts in 1848 days


#7 posted 06-29-2015 03:30 PM

I used liquid wrench on mine. it worked great. And I second the idea of the Delta T2. You’ll need to drill some holes in steel to mount it but the effort is worth it. Good luck.

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

330 posts in 1432 days


#8 posted 06-29-2015 05:09 PM

You might have some issues with the legs. I have a similar saw, and the rusted legs are very weak and will probably need bracing. Not a biggie but something to be aware of.

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

146 posts in 533 days


#9 posted 06-29-2015 05:38 PM

I’m attempting the same thing. Got a $40 CL find last week, with a good motor and arbor bearings….but no fence or extension wings. Yesterday I came across the same saw with an XR-24 fence but the arbor bearings are bad. Unfortunately, both saws have 1hp motors.

I’m going to attempt to join both saws together to have a dedicated dado-head, along with a router table extension.

My question is: How is that fence? Is it worth holding on to it?

View RobinDobbie's profile

RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1198 days


#10 posted 06-29-2015 06:24 PM

It’s not the fence that people want to get away from as much as the rails. Although to get rid of the rails you have to get rid of the fence. Aluminum rails aren’t as rigid as steel. They might get skewed when screwing into a saw where the wings aren’t perfectly flush to the main table. Then you have a situation where if you get the fence square at the blade, it’s not square for wider rips. If you’re aware of it, then you can work around it. I’ll admit it’s really nice to not have to worry about it.

View nogeel's profile

nogeel

68 posts in 532 days


#11 posted 07-06-2015 06:17 PM

A quick update I have the saw mostly tore down. I bought a gallon of Evaporust and have soaked smaller pieces in it. It seem to work like a champ for removing rust. Next, will be figuring out what to do on the bigger pieces. Here is the tilt mechanism before and after evaporust:


Anything I should do to help prevent rust in the future (besides don’t leave it outside)?

The only thing lacking is eventually get that handle removed of the lift screw, one of the stops for the tilt screw is stuck (though I did just put deep creep in it), and getting the two remaining screws removed from the arbor bearing retainer. I have used seafoam deep creep, soaked in evaporust, and attempted to drill one out with an irwin kit from Lowes. Next, I could try a torch, but would not be again taking it somewhere to get someone to drill them out for me. Where would you even get that done?

-- Jeff, Tennessee

View nogeel's profile

nogeel

68 posts in 532 days


#12 posted 07-06-2015 06:25 PM

By the Way. Thanks for the feedback. I’m really digging the Lumber Jocks Community.

-- Jeff, Tennessee

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4222 posts in 1662 days


#13 posted 07-06-2015 06:31 PM

A quick update I have the saw mostly tore down. I bought a gallon of Evaporust and have soaked smaller pieces in it. It seem to work like a champ for removing rust. Next, will be figuring out what to do on the bigger pieces.

Electrolysis works great for larger stuff…

Anything I should do to help prevent rust in the future (besides don t leave it outside)?

Wax the shiny bits, and paint the rest :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19178 posts in 2138 days


#14 posted 07-06-2015 06:35 PM

A coat of paste wax will retard rust.
For under the table, a spray silicone may work, for rust prevention….
but NOT for the surface of CI table. Silicone can interfere with wood finishes.
For moving parts, like rod threads and trunnion races….
a “dry” lubricant is a good idea.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View RobinDobbie's profile

RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1198 days


#15 posted 07-06-2015 07:15 PM

I wouldn’t recommend electrolysis. I did that for a table saw top once, what a pain in the ass and for very little gain. If it were me, I would just sand the top and be done with it. With sandpaper, you could have the top ready for action in MINUTES. However, if getting the rust off the bottom of the table is important to you for your own peace of mind, soak it in white vinegar for a day or two, then follow up with a wire brush. I’m not sure, but some of the big 50-gallon totes might be big enough. You need something that will let you set the 20” x 27” table down flat on the bottom so you can use as little vinegar as possible.

After the rust is gone from the bottom of the table, you might cover the trunnion and other holes, then go over it with some black spray paint. Don’t get the sides of the table.

showing 1 through 15 of 63 replies

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