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Freud Fusion Blade or Forrest Woodworker II?

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Forum topic by Brad posted 09-30-2009 06:41 AM 8714 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Brad

125 posts in 3239 days


09-30-2009 06:41 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw blade

Need a new all around combo blade and trying to decide between the Forrest WW2 blade or the Freud Fusion Premier blade. Anyone have experience with both?

Since both are around the same price right now they are both up for grabs.

Also anyone know what magazine recently did a big write up on tablesaw blades?

Thanks,

Brad

-- Brad -- www.bradfordwoodworking.blogspot.com


14 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#1 posted 09-30-2009 11:46 AM

Even though the P410 Fusion and the WWII are both general purpose blades, they have different strengths and weaknesses, and aren’t overly similar outside of their general purpose category and tooth count. I saw the Fusion demoed by Jerry Coles for Peachtree when it first came out and was impressed….but there’s never a free lunch. It’s different than most 40T general purpose blades, and does some things better, but there’s also a price to pay to get that performance. The Infinity Super General 010-044 is very similar…both are Hi-ATB grinds with 30° bevels (vs 10° – 20°), and both have a dual side grind and very low side clearance. The plus side is that they’re superior at ply, veneers, fine crosscuts, and polished rip cuts. The downside is that the Hi-ATB tend to abrade more rapidly than teeth with a lower bevel. The high bevel is also not as efficient at ripping as a lower bevel. The dual side grind combined with the low side clearance gives a very highly polished edge….however, if the wood is moist, prone to burning, warped, the saw’s alignment isn’t quite right, or the wood is very thick and the feed rate slows, burning is more likely to occur.

I haven’t yet spun a P410 on my own saw (waiting for a good sale!), but can say that the very similar Super General is the cleanest cutting general purpose/combo blade that I’ve used to date….I’d expect very similar results from the P410. The WWII, Ridge Carbide TS2000, Tenryu Gold Medal, and DeWalt 7657 are similar designs to each other and are more efficient rippers, but will have more tear out in crosscuts and ply than the P410 or Super General. Cleanest cut isn’t necessarily always the best choice though…as with many things, it really boils down to suitability for what you do and what the need is, as opposed to one being clearly superior to the other.

Wood Mag rated the Super General, Fusion, and WWII as their top full kerf picks in the upper price ranges…which doesn’t really help narrow the field for you! (they had originally included the TS2000 but revised their pics!) The WWII and TS2000 are both available in full and thin kerf, the Fusion and SG are only available in full kerf.

Fusion and Super General bevel angle

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View neverenoughtools's profile

neverenoughtools

10 posts in 2681 days


#2 posted 09-30-2009 12:31 PM

Years ago I was told to buy Forrest blades so I did and have had no complaints. Then a couple years ago at a show I saw the Fusion and thought I’d give it a try because as my name suggests, I tend to yearn after the shiny new tools that I don’t already own. After using them both I found that the WWII leaves a cleaner cut when ripping. I don’t know if my Fusion blade has more wobble than my WWII I just know that the wood comes out better with the WWII. I cannot tell a difference in ply or crosscutting.
I now use my WWII for most work and leave the Fusion for the “crap cutting” like MDF.

Hope this helps.

View Mark's profile

Mark

1801 posts in 2739 days


#3 posted 09-30-2009 03:46 PM

im a freud fan…ive never had a problem with my blades from them….they cut and rip the hardest and densest woods of my with ease….i dont know much about the WWII but when using my freud blades the benefit with them is that if your blade ever gets a little warped in anyway anyhow for example my circular saw just make a few more staright cuts and the blade straightens right back out. Dam italian blades! And on that topic are the WWII made in US, CAN, or else? If you support your economy go with WWII. Uhhhh, you made me think too much first thing in the morning. thx.lol

-- M.K.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#4 posted 09-30-2009 04:47 PM

”...And on that topic are the WWII made in US, CAN, or else?...”

Forrest and Ridge Carbide are American owned and made in the US. Infinity is American owned and engineered, made in Italy. Tenryu is Japanese owned, made in Japan and China depending on which line you get.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5180 posts in 2659 days


#5 posted 09-30-2009 05:21 PM

Brad, I recently ordered a new Forrest WW II (10×50 T) for rippng on my t.s., and also a 10”x 60 tooth for my RAS. I have always used Freud baldes, although I have never used the Fusion. The Freuds have always served me well, and did a great job. But—- when I put the Forrest blades on—- wow!—big difference in cuts. No chip-out on either side, and cuts smooth as advertized. I’m goning to order a couple more Forrest for spares, but will not give up my Freuds, either. So for my $$, it’s Forrest, but you have to make up your own mind, and what you want to spend for a good blade. Others will post here, and I think you’ll hear——Forrest.

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1253 posts in 3011 days


#6 posted 09-30-2009 05:27 PM

the November issue of WOOD mag did a review on saw blades under $50.

-- Smitty!!!

View Gecko13's profile

Gecko13

8 posts in 2826 days


#7 posted 01-06-2010 05:02 PM

I’ve used both Forrest and Freud blades. For the longest time I tried to save money buying lower cost ‘good’ blades, not quite wanting to suck up the cost of the WW2 blade…..although I could have for all the other blades I bought. Freud makes some good blades, but when I bolted on the WW2 and took it for a spin the result was dramatic; smooth, polished, very little to no chip out. The other blades are still used for rough cutting and breaking down sheets of plywood, but for final cutting its the WW2 making the cuts. Like I tell my boys, but sometimes forget to follow, trying to save money on tools will always cost you more $$ because you will buy it again….and again.

-- Doug - Midwest Wood Creations, www.midwestwoodcreations.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2841 days


#8 posted 01-06-2010 05:24 PM

As long as this has come back up, I think it’s really important to note that the Freud Fusion is very different than other Freud blades and is difficult to draw conclusions about the Fusion from the others. The Fusion is the only blade in Freud’s Premier line. The Forrest WWII is a great blade, but it’s interesting that Forrest has introduced a new Hi-ATB 48T general purpose blade that is somewhat similar to the Fusion and Super General.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BigG's profile

BigG

56 posts in 2534 days


#9 posted 01-06-2010 07:55 PM

As others have stated, I have wasted a lot of bucks over the years on Freud and many other latest and greatest blades until I finally caved in to Forrest. I will never go back! Just this summer while at the local Woodcraft store, I inquired about the Fusion. The fellow behind the counter immediatley said “Oh we carry a much better blade”. It was the WWII.

-- Big G

View srjaynes49's profile

srjaynes49

7 posts in 2228 days


#10 posted 08-05-2011 12:16 AM

I have the luck of having both blades. FIRST and foremost, your milage WILL vary! My tests are both a Jet Proshop 1-3/4 HP TS and my Shopsmith 520. I’ve had my Shopsmith Woodworker II since 1987 or 88. I have TWO Woodworker II’s in 5/8” bore. One new, one I got in a horse-trade. The OLDER blade works BETTER than the new blade. I should have made a warranty claim.

ALL of my blades are thin-kerf.

It is clear that in the same species of wood, using my Jet TS, my Freud Fusion works harder ripping than the Forrest WWII. The cross cuts are about the same, irrespective of species. The Freud is slightly better in HW veneer plywood. I have a Freud 30 Tooth TCG Glue-line rip blade. It manages better ripping thick softwoods. If I had a 3 or 5 hp saw, I doubt I’d see a difference and the 30 tooth would be redundant.

If I was going to own 1 blade, it would be Woodworker 40 Tooth.

If I was going to own mulitple blades, I would buy a Woodworker II 30 tooth for ripping and most cross cutting and a 48 tooth for critical crosscuts and plywood.

I JUST purchased a Sawstop Industrial TS. I’m going to Rockler tonight to get a full-kerf Woodworker II 40T. That will be the gold standard in my shop.

Steve
Portland, OR

-- Only I could be responsible for the stupid things I say. Keep the pointy ends away from your body parts and your fingers attached to your hands! Be sure to engage your brain before your tools.

View srjaynes49's profile

srjaynes49

7 posts in 2228 days


#11 posted 08-05-2011 12:19 AM

BTW, for the poster above who purchase a 50 tooth for ripping. Can you elaborate.

Common wisdom is ripping needs gullet space to clean away the sawdust. Fewer teeth are better to the point the cut finish degrades. Thirty teeth seems a good compromise between sawdust removal and cleanliness of cut.

Did I understand it was a Woodworker II for Ripping?

Steve
Portland, OR

-- Only I could be responsible for the stupid things I say. Keep the pointy ends away from your body parts and your fingers attached to your hands! Be sure to engage your brain before your tools.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1958 days


#12 posted 08-05-2011 03:01 PM

I have a WW II-30 tooth and use it for ripping quite often, and it works great. I’ll put it on when I’ll be crosscutting and ripping through wood over 1” thick. It doesn’t crosscut quite as smooth as the WW II 40 tooth, or my Freud F410 (older blade)....but it sure rips thicker wood a lot better.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1879 posts in 3456 days


#13 posted 08-05-2011 03:24 PM

I currently own both blades; I purchased the Forrest and won the Freud as a door prize. I get less burning and splintering with the Forrest. This has been most noticeable in denser woods. I.E. Hard Maple

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#14 posted 08-05-2011 03:40 PM

KnottScott knows more about blades than I know about…well, I can’t think of anything I know a lot of. You get the picture, though. Whatever he says is what I’d do. I have the WW2 but that’s just because everyone else does.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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