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Glue Blob Problems

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Forum topic by PeteCollin posted 06-28-2015 03:58 PM 1293 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PeteCollin

56 posts in 768 days


06-28-2015 03:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello All,

I have a persistent problem that i need to get around. When gluing projects, no matter how carefully I try to clean the excess glue off, there will be blobs left behind on the project. I can’t see them, because it is usually a thin sheen of glue on the wood. But when i go to put the stain or varnish on, it is revealed like hotel sheets under a black light. This is painstaking to treat after the fact. I have to wait for the finish to dry, go back and sand, and i’m not even sure if I got it all! I tried finishing the pieces before the assembly, but with my Windsor chairs, you must do some sanding and finishing AFTER you mount the legs, and this makes for inconsistency in the color afterwards. There must be some efficient way of dealing with this that I haven’t learned about or thought of. Can anybody offer advice?

Pete Collin


17 replies so far

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1196 days


#1 posted 06-28-2015 04:31 PM

When I have glue run out, I do not wipe it off. After it’s cured, I either peel it off, or use a chisel/scraper to remove the glue.
When I had my business going and had employees, I had to explain to them every day, “Do not wipe wet glue off the wood. Remove it after it has dried.” When glue is either wiped off with a finger or washed off with a wet rag, the final finish is going to be a lot worse than removing the glue when it’s dry…........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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DIYaholic

19180 posts in 2141 days


#2 posted 06-28-2015 04:40 PM

You can wipe down the project with mineral spirits….
To reveal the offending glue blobs, prior to applying the finish.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2451 days


#3 posted 06-28-2015 05:02 PM

Another thing you can do is put masking tape on both sides of the seam. Or you can wipe the still wet glue with a damp rag, or clean it with a chisel/scraper/plane afterwards. I use naphtha to check for any residual glue prior to finishing.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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Oldtool

2375 posts in 1657 days


#4 posted 06-28-2015 06:16 PM

Pete,
I am most definitely not an expert, so in my amateurs experience I’ve always wiped off excess glue with a very damp cloth, without any problems to date.
I know experts say not to do this because it smears the glue and water could seep into the joint & weaken it, but so far all my projects have held together, and applying dye hasn’t been a problem.
Having said that, I should also inform you that I have always used Titebond glue, therefore this is what my experiencd is based on.
Hope this helps.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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bondogaposis

4036 posts in 1817 days


#5 posted 06-28-2015 06:46 PM

Prevention is the best cure, try using the less glue to begin with and apply it w/ more care. Having said that I know the problem can’t be completely eliminated, so the above suggestions are good ones.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1775 days


#6 posted 06-28-2015 06:57 PM


Prevention is the best cure, try using the less glue to begin with and apply it w/ more care. Having said that I know the problem can t be completely eliminated, so the above suggestions are good ones.

- bondogaposis

Yep, use less glue.


When I have glue run out, I do not wipe it off. After it s cured, I either peel it off, or use a chisel/scraper to remove the glue.
When I had my business going and had employees, I had to explain to them every day, “Do not wipe wet glue off the wood. Remove it after it has dried.” When glue is either wiped off with a finger or washed off with a wet rag, the final finish is going to be a lot worse than removing the glue when it s dry…........... Jerry (in Tucson)

- Nubsnstubs


Yep, don’t wipe, peel it off after an hour or so.


You can wipe down the project with mineral spirits….
To reveal the offending glue blobs, prior to applying the finish.

- DIYaholic


Yep, this will make it show up.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 599 days


#7 posted 06-28-2015 07:01 PM

I been wiping glue with a wet rag for my whole career with no problems. (over 25 years)
Be sure to keep the rag clean and rinsed, and get all the glue off. Sand the wiped spot ,after it dries, with the same final grit you use on the rest of the project before you finish. I Never see glue spots after staining.
I’ve heard arguments for both sides, but my own experience proves it to be positive.

-- -

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1723 days


#8 posted 06-28-2015 09:07 PM

Pete, you can also apply wax (Johnson’s Paste Wax) to the areas adjacent to the glue surfaces. The glue won’t stick to the wax. Once the joint has dried/cured, remove the wax with naphtha. This is a little better than taping because glue can get under the tape. HTH

-- Art

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shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#9 posted 06-29-2015 12:02 AM

Of course you could use hide glue which (among its other advantages) does not interfere with finish.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View DKV's profile

DKV

3940 posts in 1970 days


#10 posted 06-29-2015 12:10 AM

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

296 posts in 700 days


#11 posted 06-29-2015 12:28 AM

While I don’t really have any constructive advise, I just wanted to throw out that you’re not alone in this issue. Thanks for posting about it. I learned a few things here.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View PeteCollin's profile

PeteCollin

56 posts in 768 days


#12 posted 06-29-2015 12:38 AM

Thank you everyone for the advice. it’s too late for the chair I am currently finishing, but the next windsor chair should be better.

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#13 posted 06-29-2015 01:42 PM



I been wiping glue with a wet rag for my whole career with no problems. (over 25 years)
Be sure to keep the rag clean and rinsed, and get all the glue off. Sand the wiped spot ,after it dries, with the same final grit you use on the rest of the project before you finish. I Never see glue spots after staining.
I ve heard arguments for both sides, but my own experience proves it to be positive.

- woodust

I do the same thing. Water tends to raise the grain so it will need to be sanded if you use a wet rag. You learn to be sparing with the wet rag and the glue, after your first staining nightmare.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1836 days


#14 posted 06-29-2015 03:04 PM

I used to wipe off with a damp rag, but now I’m in the “wait an hour and peel it off” camp. Less work, and at that point you can take off a clamp if its in the way.

If I forget to go back after an hour, I go at it with a card scraper, or a chisel if it’s in a corner. Usually while I’m doing that, I’m wishing I had remembered to go back out after an hour.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1913 days


#15 posted 06-29-2015 03:54 PM

I used to let the glue dry and then remove or scrape it but stopped doing that because in porous or soft wood like pine, the areas that were scraped clean still absorbed dyes less than the rest of the wood although it looked perfectly clean before the dye application.
I now use a wet rag to completely wipe the glue,keep using fresh rags until there’s no residue left.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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