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Different cross-cut blade recommended?

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Forum topic by villanut posted 06-27-2015 05:02 AM 808 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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villanut

12 posts in 759 days


06-27-2015 05:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I was wondering what opinions are out there for having different blades for cross-cutting on a mitre saw as opposed to using a cross-cut sled on a table saw. If so, what would the differences be?


10 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#1 posted 06-27-2015 12:48 PM

A slider should have a very low to negative hook angle. It’s generally more desirable to have a more positive hook angle for a table saw. The hook angle is less critical for a fixed miter saw, though I’d try to avoid a very steep positive hook angle. Most crosscut blades have 60T to 80T, and many have a fairly low hook angle….very few have a steep positive angle.

As with any saw blade, I’d skip the lowest end of the market. I like Infinity, Forrest, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu, Freud, CMT Industrial, Amana Tool, etc. For value I look to Irwin Marples, Freud Diablo, CMT ITK Plus, and DW Precision Trim series. Bargain Blade List

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3097 posts in 1117 days


#2 posted 06-27-2015 01:55 PM

Mr Scott, can you say a little bit about why you want a different hook angle for a miter saw vs a table saw?

-- -Dan

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 618 days


#3 posted 06-27-2015 02:05 PM

Hook Angle
On most saw blades, the faces of the teeth are tipped forward or backward, rather than being perfectly in line with the center of the blade. This is called “hook angle.” On a blade with a positive hook angle, the teeth are tipped forward, toward the direction of the blade’s rotation. A negative hook angle means that teeth tip away from the direction of rotation, and a 0° hook angle means that the teeth are in line with the center of the blade.

Hook angle has an important effect on blade operation. A blade with high positive hook angle (say, 20°) will yield a very aggressive cut and a fast feed rate. A low or negative hook angle will slow the feed rate and will also inhibit the blade’s tendency to “climb” the material being cut. A blade for ripping lumber on a table saw will generally have a high hook angle, where an aggressive, fast cut is usually what you want. Radial-arm saws and sliding compound miter saws, on the other hand, require a blade with a very low or negative hook angle to inhibit overly fast feed rate, binding and the blade’s tendency to “climb” the material.
From this site, it has more info then I copied.
http://www.rockler.com/how-to/blades-101/

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#4 posted 06-27-2015 02:49 PM

Thanks for the link to the Rockler saw guide it is certainly informative

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7216 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 06-27-2015 03:38 PM



Mr Scott, can you say a little bit about why you want a different hook angle for a miter saw vs a table saw?

- Pezking7p

There are several variables in play, but on a TS a steep hook angle helps draw the wood toward the blade, making cutting more efficient via faster feed rate, at the same time helps force the wood down on the table….one of the reasons bulk rippers have 18° to 22° hook angles. With a sliding miter saw, you want less tendency for the blade to grab the material to help maintain control, so a lower hook angle is desirable. The hook angle is less critical with a standard fixed miter saw, but it’s still best to avoid extremely steep hook angles of > 15° or so.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#6 posted 06-28-2015 05:06 AM

Since one doesn’t normally do climb cuts on a miter saw, whether slider or not, and one normally does do climb cuts on a RAS, I don’t see how they two applications are comparable. I certainly prefer a negative hook on a RAS, for obvious reasons. On a SCMS, I see no problem with a positive hook angle.

If you are doing climb cuts with a SCMS, please stop.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View villanut's profile

villanut

12 posts in 759 days


#7 posted 06-28-2015 05:28 AM



Since one doesn t normally do climb cuts on a miter saw, whether slider or not, and one normally does do climb cuts on a RAS, I don t see how they two applications are comparable. I certainly prefer a negative hook on a RAS, for obvious reasons. On a SCMS, I see no problem with a positive hook angle.

If you are doing climb cuts with a SCMS, please stop.

- runswithscissors

Maybe next time you should read the question before you answer. I made no mention of a radial arm saw or doing climb cuts on a mitre saw. Luckily for me there are others that read my question and provided an answer that is helpful.

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#8 posted 06-28-2015 08:06 AM

Sorry, I was sort of responding to a couple of later comments. The reference to “bulk rippers” hardly addresses your question either.

To answer your question, I can’t see why there should be any difference in blades used for CROSS CUTTNG whether it’s a SCMS or TS. But others probably know more about this than I do.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1592 posts in 890 days


#9 posted 06-28-2015 03:23 PM

Freud Premier Fusion is a great cross cut and rip blade combination. Better at cross cuts, IMO.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7929 posts in 1846 days


#10 posted 06-28-2015 06:04 PM

I have a Dewalt 60T miter saw blade and it leaves a cut that looks polished. Seems a little loud though.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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